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I want to hear about where your interest for the military comes from!

FSTO

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Born and raised on a farm in SW MB. Watched TV shows like Rat Patrol and Hogan's Hero's and movies like The Great Escape, Where Eagles Dare, The Longest Day. Read all the Patrick O'Brian books.
 

Journeyman

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I didn't have to have an interest in the military.

I came home one day and announced that I'd quit high school;  my dad threw my in the car and dumped me at the Recruiters, saying "make your own way home."  Five weeks later I was in Cornwallis (recruiting timelines were apparently magical back then ;) )

Best decision I never made.
 

Xylric

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mariomike said:
That's interesting. My uncle was in the RCAF. The entire 7-man crew ( Lancaster ) went MIA in eastern France six weeks after D-Day.

If you don't mind me asking, did your relative survive the war?

For another 55 years or so. He went MIA because he was injured, transferred to a hospital, and it took three months for the paperwork to catch up.  :rofl:
 

mariomike

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That's good news. He was one of the lucky ones.  :)
 

Xylric

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mariomike said:
That's good news. He was one of the lucky ones.  :)

Yes, he was, but it still meant that my grandfather at 17 had to read the telegram about his going missing to his mother. He cited that telegram as the reason he eventually became a pacifist (and the reason why he went to enlist).

The funny thing is, essentially the only reason why he got caught is that the recruiting station he went to.... was manned by the principal of his high school.
 

SquidMeister

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I've always been interested in military history, video games, novels, all that jazz, and I've always had an inkling that I would be interested in joining the military, but in my school years I was completely out of shape.  In the last year I have shed a bunch of weight and with me not being sure what I want to do with my life, the military seems like a good option now.  Serve my country and find out where I want to go in life and all that jazz.
 
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I too, was always in awe of the military life, going way back to when I was playing FPS-multiplayer games like CoD, Starwars Battlefront and Killzone on the PS2 at my relatives house, when I was a wittle lad. This shifted over to games on the computer like Combat Arms, Red Crucible, ARMA, Arctic Combat, etc. After high-school, the most recent games I recall playing is World of Tanks and War Thunder.

But all that virtual fun aside, I wanted to pursue a career in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) that would help me develop as a person, and to learn as much as I can from my future instructors, and my colleagues throughout my career in the CAF. I am blessed to be born and raised in such a peaceful nation as Canada and want to give back by serving this country as a sailor. The salary, benefits and pension also is a plus beside the experience and learning. It will help support buying a house, a future family when/if I plan to marry and have kids, and finance their education ... the generic happily ever after story I guess. 😂

I was also told that I am the first member of my family, enlisting in the military. I hope to make my family proud with this career. I was born and raised in Toronto with a younger sister. My parents and majority of my family are from Vietnam.

My future plans in the CAF is to serve the full 25+ years in the Navy, and hopefully reach RAdm rank before I retire. Idk how realistic that goal will be, but ik I will have to work my arse off to earn it!
 

Dhillongs

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Father was Indian Air Force 15yrs , grandfather was a police officer under British in India posted to Hong Kong, runs in the family to do something similar I suppose, no one talked me into it but I lived in Edmonton during my school would see soldiers everyday at griesbach so something must have clicked joined up and came right back to Edmonton.
 

GreyWarden

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I guess I've felt the calling since a young age. I never did cadets though. Some video games may have inspired the idea, despite knowing they're nothing like what actually happens. I think it's the nature, the structure that appealed to me as well. The mentality of some passionate individuals, whether real or fictional. I remember being in kindergarten or Grade 1, just learning about Remembrance Day and what it's about, it stuck to me, and I felt an urge every year to pay my respects, but I also felt like I wanted to give back when I got older. When I was very young, I use to see the ads on TV all the time about signing up. Years and years later there was an aboriginal summer program that can give you a taste of military life, and even get you BMQ qualified.
I did the summer program "Bold Eagle" in 2021, I did attempt it in 2017 but was sent home for a sprained ankle. So this was me finishing something I wanted to start. Since then I have struggled a bit in terms of self esteem and self doubt, after continuously pissing my platoon mates off at times for my setbacks which I took a little personal. I want to do better I just don't know where to start? I got ADHD so it caused me some setbacks but I don't want it to define me. I am wishing to get evaluated for any possible learning differences and perhaps do some cognitive training to amp myself up so I can feel more confident in my decision and my abilities. I've always been quite hard on myself. I just want to do well.
Sorry for rambling - that's another ADHD trait!
 

btrudy

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Not too complicated really. I didn't want to get stuck in the trap of being in the oil and gas industry and having to deal with massive layoffs every time there's an industry downswing. The military offered rock solid job stability with some decent benefits including the best pension in the country.
 

Colin Parkinson

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Growing up with lot's veterans from WWII and shows like Combat, World at war, Stalg 13 and Rat Patrol. Plus model building really directed me into tanks. I gave a hour long presentation to my grade 8 class on the development of AFV's. Problem was I did it in monotone voice and even the teacher was struggling to stay awake :giggle:
 

Skysix

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I visited behind the curtain as far as the Urals / north of the Black Sea in '81 and later read the translated version of Helene Carrere d'Encausse's 1978 book "l'empire éclaté" while backpacking and avoiding attention during Reforger 82. It took almost 2 years to get my security clearance and join up as a Combat Engineer, but I never had any doubts why it was necessary. Sadly, it is again.

While in I got cross-trained as a MSE-Op and Medic (was a civilian ground/flight ACP/CCP). Got out after 14 years in the reserves as a mission specialist atached to an RCAF SQN to finish nursing school. Time passes and now I am a contractor for the US Army Reserve doing Medevacs on a large training base.
 

rmc_wannabe

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I was in Cadets from about age 12 onward and it was my escape from shitty situations. I squeaked through high-school and it was a one way ticket out of my ghetto ass neighbourhood.

16 years later, best decision I ever made. I'd probably be in jail, homeless, or dead if I didn't join.
 

OldSolduer

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I was in Cadets from about age 12 onward and it was my escape from shitty situations. I squeaked through high-school and it was a one way ticket out of my ghetto ass neighbourhood.

16 years later, best decision I ever made. I'd probably be in jail, homeless, or dead if I didn't join.

I’m glad you’re here. 👍🏻
 
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Not sure exactly how it started, my granddad was a WWII Veteran (yes, I'm older now, in my 40s). I grew up in a very disciplined and regulated environment. Came to Canada, became a nurse. Was hoping to be existing in a professional environment, working with disciplined people because patients' lives are at stake. No way, in Canada you can't even tell a colleague they are late or doing substandard job without being called a bully... I've never been late to work, never. I am hoping to find a place that holds people to the highest standards. It seems like CAF might be the place. I do realize I might be wrong. But I want to find out and to become a nurse with CAF. I can't tell I'm excited about shooting things like others here, but I could if I need to. If I have free time and want to watch a movie, I would usually choose something about Middle East conflicts, if available. When traveling I'd only go to military museums or old ships/submarines. Photos of the medics and nurses being transported in a Globemaster make my heart beat faster. Hopefully CAF and I would benefit from each other.
 

daftandbarmy

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Not sure exactly how it started, my granddad was a WWII Veteran (yes, I'm older now, in my 40s). I grew up in a very disciplined and regulated environment. Came to Canada, became a nurse. Was hoping to be existing in a professional environment, working with disciplined people because patients' lives are at stake. No way, in Canada you can't even tell a colleague they are late or doing substandard job without being called a bully... I've never been late to work, never. I am hoping to find a place that holds people to the highest standards. It seems like CAF might be the place. I do realize I might be wrong. But I want to find out and to become a nurse with CAF. I can't tell I'm excited about shooting things like others here, but I could if I need to. If I have free time and want to watch a movie, I would usually choose something about Middle East conflicts, if available. When traveling I'd only go to military museums or old ships/submarines. Photos of the medics and nurses being transported in a Globemaster make my heart beat faster. Hopefully CAF and I would benefit from each other.

No worries. Nurses don't shoot people in the CAF. Unless they're protecting patients apparently, which is slightly ironic ;)
 

OldSolduer

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Not sure exactly how it started, my granddad was a WWII Veteran (yes, I'm older now, in my 40s). I grew up in a very disciplined and regulated environment. Came to Canada, became a nurse. Was hoping to be existing in a professional environment, working with disciplined people because patients' lives are at stake. No way, in Canada you can't even tell a colleague they are late or doing substandard job without being called a bully... I've never been late to work, never. I am hoping to find a place that holds people to the highest standards. It seems like CAF might be the place. I do realize I might be wrong. But I want to find out and to become a nurse with CAF. I can't tell I'm excited about shooting things like others here, but I could if I need to. If I have free time and want to watch a movie, I would usually choose something about Middle East conflicts, if available. When traveling I'd only go to military museums or old ships/submarines. Photos of the medics and nurses being transported in a Globemaster make my heart beat faster. Hopefully CAF and I would benefit from each other.
Welcome to our world. Good luck in your future endeavours. (y)
 

torg003

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All the uncles on my mother's side (from Red Deer) served in the war (all made it back). Uncle by marriage (to my mother's youngest sister) was in the RCN and served in the North Atlantic (as well as later in the Mediterranean). Actually had a distant cousin (also from RD) who was in the Dieppe raid, and after, a German concentration camp (he made it back too). My father was in the army during the war, but wasn't sent overseas . He had to wait until he was old enough to join and by the time he finished his 18 month training, the war was over. Right after the war, he played a couple of years for the Calgary Stampeders, but had to leave that to support his mother (and younger brother) when his father died suddenly. Later he became a pipefitter. I guess there wasn't a lot of work (before the oil boom), so he joined the RCAF. He was in for 20 years and earned a CD. Right smack in the middle of this service the whole unification of the armed forces happened. I remember him coming home from work one day wearing a completely different uniform and was quite surprised. Didn't like the green colour, but thought the gold SGT stripes with the maple leaf above it looked kinda cool. Joined RC Air Cadets but wasn't in that long. My brother stayed longer and made LAC. He also go to go to Cadet Camp in Greenwood, NS. Even though I got a little bored of cadets, all the other things I mentioned helped me maintain a life long interest in the Canadian military. That's why I like to come here. Cheers.
 
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