• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Complete list of benefits of being in the Armed Forces

KalydonSB

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
10
Hello,

I am trying to convince my wife and family that a career in the Forces is a good idea, but I am having trouble finding any specific information on the benefits of service. (Other than the provided full health care and has good wages)

Does anyone know where I can got to get this information or can provide me some details?
 

dangerboy

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
392
Points
910
Hello,

I am trying to convince my wife and family that a career in the Forces is a good idea, but I am having trouble finding any specific information on the benefits of service. (Other than the provided full health care and has good wages)

Does anyone know where I can got to get this information or can provide me some details?
I presume you have already checked out the official CAF recruiting site, it has a section Pay and Benefits: https://forces.ca/en/life-in-the-military/
 

KalydonSB

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
10
I presume you have already checked out the official CAF recruiting site, it has a section Pay and Benefits: https://forces.ca/en/life-in-the-military/
Yes, I have been to the site. However I had heard things and wanted to know if they were true, like the children of enlisted members get free post secondary education in Canada. Things like that, that aren't of the site are what I look for information about.
 

kev994

Sr. Member
Subscriber
Reaction score
158
Points
610
Yes, I have been to the site. However I had heard things and wanted to know if they were true, like the children of enlisted members get free post secondary education in Canada. Things like that, that aren't of the site are what I look for information about.
You couldn’t find it because it’s not a real thing.
 

kev994

Sr. Member
Subscriber
Reaction score
158
Points
610
The Canadian Forces app has a section on benefits that compiles a few resources, it’s under the Resources tab.
 

dimsum

Army.ca Fixture
Mentor
Reaction score
1,434
Points
940
like the children of enlisted members get free post secondary education in Canada.
God, I wish.

Also, we pay the same income taxes as everyone else unless we're on named operations outside Canada. If I had a dollar every time someone thought we either didn't pay provincial income tax, or didn't pay taxes at all...
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
381
Points
1,130
, like the children of enlisted members get free post secondary education in Canada.
If I recall correctly, there may have been a discussion of that regarding the children of members who were KIA.
 

PuckChaser

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Mentor
Reaction score
650
Points
1,060
If I recall correctly, there may have been a discussion of that regarding the children of members who were KIA.
It's not automatic but there's various charities and funds set up to help children of the fallen pay for post-secondary.
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
381
Points
1,130
Holy shit. You can't find it?

2021 is giving surprises the same as 2020.

:)
Challenge accepted! :)

Scholarships and funding for children of CF members killed on duty​

Scholarships and funding for children of CF members killed on duty

School education paid for children of slain soldiers​

School education paid for children of slain soldiers | Army.ca

The RCR Education Fund for Children of Fallen Soldiers​

The RCR Education Fund for Children of Fallen Soldiers | Army.ca
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
4,478
Points
1,060
Hello,

I am trying to convince my wife and family that a career in the Forces is a good idea, but I am having trouble finding any specific information on the benefits of service. (Other than the provided full health care and has good wages)

Does anyone know where I can got to get this information or can provide me some details?
The reality, which is underplayed by almost everyone, is that it is a full on demanding career with alot of travel, separation, hidden costs (financial and otherwise) and frustrating red tape. You can also be killed or seriouly wounded as a basic job requirement, which I admit is rather unique.

As a result, unlike many other civilian occupations, the true benefits are almost entirely intrinsic and related to the service you provide to your country.

I recall an interesting conversation with one of my in-laws who - not being military - opined: 'The army is great for kids because it teaches them discipline and pays them to learn a trade that they can use in civilian life'.

My reply was along the lines of: 'You can learn discipline and get a marketable trade at any community college, leading directly to work in the community. People should only join the Army if they're willing to kill, or die, for their country. Anyone who joins for any other reason is being lied to, or an idiot'.

Cue pregnant silence...

Long story short: it's best to honestly weigh the pros and cons as opposed to embarking on some kind of 'sales campaign'.
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
381
Points
1,130
My reply was along the lines of: 'You can learn discipline and get a marketable trade at any community college, leading directly to work in the community.
There are exceptions, of course, but as a general rule, give me a veteran anytime.

Most "embrace the discipline" of their new organization better than straight out of college recruits.
 

Blackadder1916

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
457
Points
1,030
My reply was along the lines of: 'You can learn discipline and get a marketable trade at any community college, leading directly to work in the community. People should only join the Army if they're willing to kill, or die, for their country. Anyone who joins for any other reason is being lied to, or an idiot'.

Cue pregnant silence...

Long story short: it's best to honestly weigh the pros and cons as opposed to embarking on some kind of 'sales campaign'.

I'm checking my impulse to shout "horseshit". There can be many perspectives in making a decision to join the military. Patriotism, adventure, duty, boredom, poverty . . . And likewise for the choice of trade in the military. I agree that individuals should be aware that killing and dying are intrinsic to military functions. However, the possibility of either happening are low (barring a sudden outbreak of a full spectrum war) and even then for some trades, the incidence of injury or death is probably no greater (and may even be lower) than in comparable civilian occupations.

I readily admit that the "primary" motivation why I joined the CF back many decades ago was (to steal a phrase used by an instructor on my TQ3 as the reason Nflders joined in large numbers) "because the garbage cans were frozen in the winter". It was steady employment with a future (though the pay was shit back then), there were opportunities to travel (get off the rock, at least), some of the things were adventurous and yes, I'll admit that I liked wearing a uniform. Killing and dying were not factors in my decision matrix. I don't think I was lied to and, despite the many stupid things I've done in the past 65 years, I don't think I'm an idiot. And while I haven't had to personally kill anyone (not that I haven't wanted to on occasion), I have dealt with my fair share of death, but that was part of my trade (or a couple of the trades I had during my career).

Not everyone in uniform is there to fix bayonets, shout follow me and clear Scotty Dog Wood (though I went through those phases :)); a large part of the military, in many cases the best remunerated part, turn wrenches and bend metal. Should they think of themselves just as tradesmen all wearing the same colour (multi-colour) clothes, no, I'm not saying that, but neither should they think themselves lesser mortals because their stock in trade is "a trade".
 

CountDC

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
15
Points
480
part of my motivation to join was it was better than starving
 

Weinie

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1,248
Points
1,010
I'm checking my impulse to shout "horseshit". There can be many perspectives in making a decision to join the military. Patriotism, adventure, duty, boredom, poverty . . . And likewise for the choice of trade in the military. I agree that individuals should be aware that killing and dying are intrinsic to military functions. However, the possibility of either happening are low (barring a sudden outbreak of a full spectrum war) and even then for some trades, the incidence of injury or death is probably no greater (and may even be lower) than in comparable civilian occupations.

I readily admit that the "primary" motivation why I joined the CF back many decades ago was (to steal a phrase used by an instructor on my TQ3 as the reason Nflders joined in large numbers) "because the garbage cans were frozen in the winter". It was steady employment with a future (though the pay was shit back then), there were opportunities to travel (get off the rock, at least), some of the things were adventurous and yes, I'll admit that I liked wearing a uniform. Killing and dying were not factors in my decision matrix. I don't think I was lied to and, despite the many stupid things I've done in the past 65 years, I don't think I'm an idiot. And while I haven't had to personally kill anyone (not that I haven't wanted to on occasion), I have dealt with my fair share of death, but that was part of my trade (or a couple of the trades I had during my career).

Not everyone in uniform is there to fix bayonets, shout follow me and clear Scotty Dog Wood (though I went through those phases :)); a large part of the military, in many cases the best remunerated part, turn wrenches and bend metal. Should they think of themselves just as tradesmen all wearing the same colour (multi-colour) clothes, no, I'm not saying that, but neither should they think themselves lesser mortals because their stock in trade is "a trade".
Perhaps D&B's experience and motivation and rationale were different from yours. I joined mainly because my Uncle, whom I highly respected, said it would be a good choice for me. Almost 39 years later, (and having experienced many of the ups and downs/things that most go through) I can definitely state he was right.
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
381
Points
1,130
People should only join the Army if they're willing to kill, or die, for their country.
WW2 US Army Draft Board: "Do you think you can kill?"

"I don't know about strangers, but my friends yes." :)
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
4,478
Points
1,060
I'm checking my impulse to shout "horseshit". There can be many perspectives in making a decision to join the military. Patriotism, adventure, duty, boredom, poverty . . . And likewise for the choice of trade in the military. I agree that individuals should be aware that killing and dying are intrinsic to military functions. However, the possibility of either happening are low (barring a sudden outbreak of a full spectrum war) and even then for some trades, the incidence of injury or death is probably no greater (and may even be lower) than in comparable civilian occupations.

I readily admit that the "primary" motivation why I joined the CF back many decades ago was (to steal a phrase used by an instructor on my TQ3 as the reason Nflders joined in large numbers) "because the garbage cans were frozen in the winter". It was steady employment with a future (though the pay was shit back then), there were opportunities to travel (get off the rock, at least), some of the things were adventurous and yes, I'll admit that I liked wearing a uniform. Killing and dying were not factors in my decision matrix. I don't think I was lied to and, despite the many stupid things I've done in the past 65 years, I don't think I'm an idiot. And while I haven't had to personally kill anyone (not that I haven't wanted to on occasion), I have dealt with my fair share of death, but that was part of my trade (or a couple of the trades I had during my career).

Not everyone in uniform is there to fix bayonets, shout follow me and clear Scotty Dog Wood (though I went through those phases :)); a large part of the military, in many cases the best remunerated part, turn wrenches and bend metal. Should they think of themselves just as tradesmen all wearing the same colour (multi-colour) clothes, no, I'm not saying that, but neither should they think themselves lesser mortals because their stock in trade is "a trade".
Regardless, where wives and kids are involved, it's never a good idea to try and downplay the negatives of the military family lifestyle or you could have a bigger issue on your hands in a couple of years after you've only been home for a total of 6-8 months in that time-frame...

....or something like that.
 
Top