Author Topic: India (Superthread)  (Read 190134 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 74,620
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,654
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #400 on: October 08, 2019, 15:31:13 »
IAF finally getting some new fighters:
Quote
Dassault delivers first Rafale to India

New Delhi has taken delivery of its first four Dassault Rafales, completing a decades-long odyssey to obtain a new fighter for the Indian air force

The jets were handed over to Indian defence minister Raksha Mantri at a ceremony held at Dassault's Merignac production line near Bordeaux in southwest France.

Part of a 36-unit order placed by the government of Narendra Modi in 2016, the off-the-shelf acquisition of the Rafales was not without controversy, coming shortly after the cancellation of the long-running Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) contest.

In 2018, then Air Chief Marshall BS Dhanoa described the 2016 decision to obtain the 36 aircraft as an “emergency buy” to shore up India’s falling number of fighter units: the nation has 33 combat squadrons against an authorised strength of 42.5.

Though the Rafale was also the winner of the 126-aircraft MMRCA competition, this deal collapsed despite three years of negotiations, with stumbling blocks including disagreements over production, intellectual property, and whether Dassault or Hindustan Aeronautics (HAL), which was to build 108 examples locally, would be responsible for the quality of India-assembled jets.

Under offset commitments related to the latest deal, the French manufacturer has established a joint venture in India - Dassault Reliance Aerospace - which will manufacture several components for the Falcon 2000 business jet.

“I am particularly honored to host this ceremony today as India is part of Dassault Aviation’s DNA. The long and trustful relationship we share is an undeniable success and underpins my determination of establishing for the long-term Dassault Aviation in India.

"We stand alongside the Indian air force since 1953, we are totally committed to fulfill its requirements for the decades to come and to be part of India’s ambitious vision for the future," says Eric Trappier, Dassault chief executive.

Though the 36 Rafales give a boost to the Indian air force, the need for modernisation is as urgent as ever: in early 2018, the defence ministry issued a request for information (RFI) for 110 new fighters, essentially a reboot of MMRCA, with local production again a major element.

Interested parties are Lockheed Martin with the F-16V (rebadged as the F-21 for the competition), the Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, Saab Gripen E/F, and Eurofighter Typhoon. There is also separate 57-aircraft requirement for a carrier-borne fighter
[emphasis added--but maybe more Rafales? Who knows with Indian procurement, see this: https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/defense/2019-09-27/more-rafale-fighters-india].

In addition, New Delhi continues work on indigenous programmes such as the HAL Tejas and the low-observable Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft.


https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/dassault-delivers-first-rafale-to-india-461332/

Mark
Ottawa

« Last Edit: October 08, 2019, 15:42:44 by MarkOttawa »
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 74,620
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,654
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #401 on: October 13, 2019, 13:27:59 »
And Ottawa's credibility:

Quote
​OPINION: Why India must learn from Rafale procurement

Pronouncements at aircraft handover ceremonies are not prone to understatement. Indeed, Dassault hailed its delivery of the first of 36 Rafale fighters to New Delhi as a “celebration of the history of mutual trust” between the French company and India.

It also added a hearty dollop of industrial participation sop in a bow to Indian prime minister Narendra Modi’s “Make in India” campaign. Dassault chief executive Eric Trappier tossed in that greatest of corporate accolades, stating that India is now "part of Dassault Aviation's DNA”.

Yet, the nation's 2016 deal for 36 French-assembled Rafales represents no great success for New Delhi or Dassault, but a concession prize. It happened only because a 126-aircraft medium multi-role combat aircraft (MMRCA) deal collapsed. Although the Rafale secured preferred status in 2012, three years of negotiation between Dassault and New Delhi ended in failure.

In addition to shattering New Delhi’s already nebulous credibility in defence procurement, the MMRCA debacle eliminated the Indian air force’s chances of obtaining a large infusion of urgently-needed fighters in a reasonable timeframe. Only Modi’s imperious leadership style allowed the 36 jet deal to happen.

New Delhi’s latest requirement for 110 fighters – cynically dubbed by some as ‘MMRCA 2.0’ – features the same contestants as last time.

It is to be hoped that lessons have been learned. Soaking up platitudes from a defence contractor is far easier than avoiding a repetition of history.
https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/opinion-why-india-must-learn-from-rafale-procureme-461382/

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 74,620
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,654
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #402 on: October 19, 2019, 13:36:33 »
Pretty impressive ramjet cruise missile if works as advertised, good plane to carry it:

Quote
IAF operationalises air-launched BrahMos cruise missile in major capability milestone
With longer reach and greater destructive potential than any anti-surface air weapon wielded by India, the 450-km range missile increases India's options for stand-off, cross-border targetting

The Indian Air Force (IAF) has inducted and operationalised the air-launched, extended range BrahMos supersonic cruise missile.

With a kill range of 450 km, this is the IAF's most potent air-launched anti-surface weapon, and its induction is a significant capability milestone.

The missile has been mated with select Sukhoi-30MKI fighters. An estimated 42 Su-30MKIs will be modified to wield the airborne BrahMos. The modified Sukhois will have the capability to carry only one BrahMos at a time as part of a weapons configuration which also includes four RVV AE (R-77) air-to-air medium range missiles, two R-73 air-to-air short range missiles and six 250 kg bombs.

    "The modified Sukhois will have the capability to carry only one BrahMos at a time as part of a weapons configuration which also includes four RVV AE (R-77) air-to-air medium range missiles, two R-73 air-to-air short range missiles and six 250 kg bombs"

"A few BrahMos-armed aircraft will be provided to all IAF Su-30MKI squadrons to wield this capability," an informed observer disclosed. Some will also be kept in reserve.

Analysts term the IAF BrahMos capability "phenomenal". This has a longer range and more destructive potential than any other air-to-surface weapon wielded by the IAF so far.

"The air-launched BrahMos has a strategic role. It is to destroy targets in depth which have strategic value and compromise the war waging capability of an adversary," remarked Air Marshal BK Pandey (Retired), a former Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief of the IAF's Training Command. The strategic targets in depth could be major military bases, ammunition dumps and vital installations. "With its range, the IAF can launch this weapon from its own airspace," Air Marshal Pandey said, pointing out the enhanced stand-off attack capability against a persistent adversary.

    "The air-launched BrahMos has a strategic role. It is to destroy targets in depth which have strategic value and compromise the war waging capability of an adversary," remarked Air Marshal BK Pandey (Retired), a former Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief of the IAF's Training Command

The availability of this weapon increases India military options for launching surprise precision cross-border attacks from a stand-off range.

This will also beef up India's anti-ship capability in a maritime role, and enable quick reaction against an enemy warship up to 1,400 km from India's coastline [emphasis added].

Its 2.8 Mach supersonic speed and terrain-hugging flight mode also makes it improbable to intercept. "In recently-concluded user trials, this missile has shown itself to be very spectacular, very accurate," a senior IAF officer told SP's Aviation [emphasis added].

India's co-option as a full member of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) has enabled the increase in the range of the BrahMos from 290 km to 450 km.

http://www.sps-aviation.com/news/?id=850&catId=1&h=IAF-operationalises-air-launched-BrahMos-cruise-missile-in-major-capability-milestone

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.