Author Topic: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread  (Read 1272426 times)

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3575 on: October 03, 2019, 15:18:21 »
Meanwhile foreign policy and China effectively absent from our election--note China has Swedish hostage and Sweden is actually showing leadership vs PRC (also Russian angle, Arctic/Belt and Road, Huawei at end):

Quote
Sweden cautions European Union on Beijing-Moscow ties and ‘challenges’ posed by China

    *Scandinavian country urges the European Union to adopt a ‘common and clear’ stance to deal with China’s growing geopolitical ambitions in Europe
    *Paper comes with Sweden’s relations with China at the lowest ebb among all EU member nations


Sweden has unveiled a China strategy paper detailing Stockholm’s concerns about Beijing-Moscow ties and urging the European Union to adopt a “common and clear” position to “manage the challenges” posed by China’s growing geopolitical ambitions in Europe.

Released on Wednesday, a day after Chinese President Xi Jinping declared on the 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic that “no force” could obstruct China’s advances, the paper comes as Sweden’s relations with China are at the lowest ebb among all EU member nations.

Former Hong Kong bookseller Gui Minhai, a Swedish national born in China, has spent much of the past four years in detention for publishing politically sensitive materials.

In addition, the proliferation of Chinese investments across Europe is forcing Sweden – a traditional advocate of free trade – to move towards considering a national investment-screening mechanism.

Sweden’s strategy paper “calls for cooperation between the EU and the US in meeting security-related challenges stemming from China’s global rise”, said Bjorn Jerden, Asia programme head at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs.

China’s growing bond with the major power in Sweden’s backyard – Russia – also is stoking concern among Stockholm politicians, according to the document.

“China’s relationship with Russia is developing, even if linked with uncertainty,” said the paper, which the Swedish foreign ministry published after gathering input from the country’s major parliamentary party leaders.

“The relationship is bound together by a common interest in changing the international system for the benefit of both countries.”

The paper also drew attention to Sweden’s concerns over China’s effort to gain “greater influence over the Arctic”. Last year, China moved to extend its massive infrastructure project, the Belt and Road Initiative, to the far north by developing shipping lanes that global warming has opened up in the polar region.

Dubbing the proposed new routes the “Polar Silk Road”, China said it would encourage enterprises to build infrastructure and conduct commercial trial voyages along Arctic shipping routes.

While stressing that Sweden will fall into line with the EU on an overall China strategy, the paper indirectly castigates the bloc for failing to come up with a comprehensive plan for handling the world’s second-largest economy...

Sweden concedes in the paper that bilateral relations with China are in poor shape, even though it was the first Western country to recognise the communist power nearly seven decades ago.

“Sweden’s relations with China are adversely affected by a number of bilateral problems,” it said.

One of these is the case of the imprisoned Swedish citizen Gui Minhai, where Chinese authorities, despite demands from the Swedish government, refuse to fulfil the obligations China has under international consular agreements, and refuse to comply with Swedish demands for Gui’s release [emphasis added, do we make "demands"?].”

While calling for “more powerful cooperation” within the EU on handling China’s digital development, the paper did not mention Chinese telecoms giant Huawei Technologies by name even when it referred to EU countries’ concerns over 5G development.

A diplomatic source, speaking on condition of anonymity, said some Swedish parliamentary party leaders were hesitant to mention Huawei during the consultative stage for the foreign ministry’s paper.

Huawei has been portrayed as a cybersecurity threat by the EU, which is conducting a risk assessment based on member states’ concerns about the company’s dominance and omnipresence in next-generation 5G mobile development across Europe.

Swedish telecoms supplier Ericsson also is a major player in the 5G infrastructure market, although Huawei leads the field globally in technological advancement.
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/politics/article/3031341/sweden-cautions-eu-beijing-moscow-ties-and-need-manage

Mark
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Offline Journeyman

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3576 on: October 04, 2019, 08:17:14 »
One of the missiles seems to have a MIRV capability and could hit US targets in 30 minutes or so. In my book the PRC might have moved to the top of the threat list.
Displacing who, in your opinion?

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3577 on: October 08, 2019, 15:40:36 »
Yet another example of the Dragon spreading its wings abroad as its talons grasp for Weltmacht (https://archive.org/details/FischerFritzGermanysAimsInTheFirstWorldWar/page/n4):

Quote
China’s surveillance tech is spreading globally, raising concerns about Beijing’s influence

    *China has created a vast surveillance apparatus at home consisting of millions of cameras equipped with facial recognition technology.
    *Now, some of the country’s largest firms have signed deals around the world to sell their tech abroad.
    *Experts raised concerns about data being siphoned back to China, authoritarian regimes using the tech to increase their power and ultimately the Chinese Communist Party having more influence abroad.

China’s push to export its surveillance technology via some of its biggest companies, including to liberal democracies, has raised concerns because of the risk of data being siphoned back to Beijing and the growing influence of the Communist Party, experts told CNBC.

The world’s second-largest economy has built a vast surveillance state comprised of millions of cameras powered by facial recognition software. The devices, perched on lamp posts and outside buildings and streets, are able to recognize individuals.

Some of China’s most valuable technology firms have been involved in such projects across the country. But this technology is now being exported as the nation’s technology firms expand their global footprint.

Chinese tech companies — particularly Huawei, Hikvision, Dahua, and ZTE — supply artificial intelligence surveillance technology in 63 countries, according to a September report by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace think tank. Of those nations, 36 have signed onto China’s massive infrastructure project, the Belt and Road Initiative, the report said, adding that Huawei supplies technology to the highest number of countries.

Some of these so-called “smart city” projects, which include surveillance technologies, are underway in Western countries, particularly in Europe, including Germany, Spain and France, according to analysis by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) [emphasis added].

Experts warned of a number of risks including potential access to data by the Chinese government.

“I think that sometimes there is an assumption that ‘oh well when we roll out this technology we aren’t going to use it in a negative way, we are using it to provide services or we are using it in a way that is seen as acceptable, socially acceptable in our society,’” Samantha Hoffman, a fellow at ASPI’s Cyber Centre, told CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast.

“But actually (we) can’t be sure of that because the difference isn’t necessarily how the technology is being deployed, but who has access to the data it’s collecting,” she said. “If it’s a Chinese company like Huawei, and that … data goes back to China and can be used by the party in whatever way that it chooses.”..

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/08/china-is-exporting-surveillance-tech-like-facial-recognition-globally.html

Mark
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3578 on: October 08, 2019, 16:12:51 »
Now this--where's Canada:

Quote
US puts visa restrictions on Chinese officials over abuses of Muslims in Xinjiang

    *The U.S. puts visa restrictions on Chinese officials in response to abuses of Muslims in the Xinjiang region.
    *It follows a move from the Trump administration to blacklist 28 entities and companies.
    *It adds to tensions between the U.S. and China only two days before high-stakes trade talks are set to resume in Washington...
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/08/us-puts-visa-restrictions-on-chinese-officials-over-abuses-of-muslims-in-xinjiang.html?__source=newsletter|breakingnewshttps://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/08/us-puts-visa-restrictions-on-chinese-officials-over-abuses-of-muslims-in-xinjiang.html

Mark
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Online Colin P

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3579 on: October 14, 2019, 12:50:55 »
Delink the Communist party from China in our language is the thrust of this article and prevent it's tentacles from reaching to far into Western society.

oops forgot link https://quillette.com/2019/07/22/when-the-lion-wakes-the-global-threat-of-the-chinese-communist-party/?fbclid=IwAR0kyx14m-g80D5_SJcVCTtKdN8ALwN8YKV06mGPbZThT2VWdvBC5EOkypU
« Last Edit: October 15, 2019, 12:44:22 by Colin P »

Online Colin P

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3581 on: October 17, 2019, 13:42:52 »
Something we should do and almost certainly won't--Chinese consulates general in Vancouver and Toronto especially big menaces:

Quote
Under New Rule, Chinese Diplomats Must Notify State Dept. of Meetings in U.S.
State Department officials said the new measures were ordered in reciprocity for China’s strict limits on the actions of American diplomats there.

The United States has begun requiring Chinese diplomats to notify the State Department before any meetings they plan to have with local or state officials and with educational and research institutions, the State Department said Wednesday.

The move was a reaction to the Chinese government’s rules for American diplomats in China, a senior State Department official said. American diplomats are generally required to obtain the permission of Chinese officials in Beijing before they can travel to official meetings in the provinces or to visit institutions, the official said.

The new State Department requirement was still less onerous than that imposed by China. Chinese diplomats are not required to seek permission for the meetings; they need only to notify the State Department in advance.

One aim of the new restrictions was to get China to relent on its limits on the actions of American diplomats, the official said, adding that the United States had complained to the Chinese government about the regulations, to no avail.
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The new rule, described by State Department officials on the condition of anonymity, applies to officials working at all Chinese Missions in the United States and its territories, including at the United Nations.

The policy of reciprocity is sure to add to the growing tensions between the United States and China...
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/16/world/asia/china-state-department-diplomats.html


E.g. Would be nice if we had a record of Michael Chan's meetings (doubt CSIS knew about all of them):

1)  Spookery in Canada: China, CSIS and…the Ontario Government
https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2015/06/17/mark-collins-spookery-in-canada-china-csis-and-the-ontario-government/

2) Spookery in Canada: China, CSIS and…the Ontario Government, Part 2
https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2015/06/17/mark-collins-spookery-in-canada-china-csis-and-the-ontario-government-part-2/

3) How Convenient: “Ontario minister Michael Chan defends China’s human-rights record”
https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/mark-collins-how-convenient-ontario-minister-michael-chan-defends-chinas-human-rights-record/

Mark
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Offline Thucydides

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3582 on: October 20, 2019, 21:23:36 »
While the headline is overblown, the reality of internal divisions inside the CCP is something we tend to overlook:

https://donsurber.blogspot.com/2019/10/xi-may-face-coup.html

Quote
Xi may face a coup

[snip]
The newspaper reported, "In Beijing’s system, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) holds a monopoly on power. But the party leadership is not a monolithic group. CCP leaders span a range of political associations, socioeconomic backgrounds, professional credentials, geographic associations and policy preferences. Two broad camps in the leadership vigorously vie for influence and control in post-Deng China: the elitist coalition, with its core faction of princelings (leaders who come from veteran revolutionary families), and the populist coalition, which primarily consists of so-called tuanpai (leaders who advanced their careers through the Chinese Communist Youth League)."

Elitists vs. populists. Sound familiar?

Chairman Xi is part of the former. Red China may not be immune from the worldwide rise in populism because populism is a reaction to the failure of elitists to protect the people. Factory closings in the rust belt in the 1970s led to the Reagan Revolution.

How this ties into issues like Hong Kong, Taiwan, the trade war with the United States and so on will be interesting to watch in the future.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3583 on: October 21, 2019, 13:10:15 »
This doesn't seem terribly practical to me:

Quote
USAF looks for expeditionary precision landing system for Pacific

The US Air Force (USAF) is looking for a precision approach landing system to enable its aircraft to land at expeditionary air strips on islands in the Pacific Ocean.

The service is asking military contractors to submit white papers that outline component-level designs and trade-off analyses to determine the right mix of requirements necessary for a Small Footprint Precision Approach and Landing Capability (SF-PALC) system, it says in an online notice on 17 October.

The USAF would use information from the white papers to set requirements for a separate contract to fund development of prototypes from one or more manufacturers. A production contract could follow the prototyping phase, says the service.

The expeditionary precision approach landing system is needed to help the USAF carry out its Agile Combat Employment (ACE) strategy in the Pacific Ocean. The strategy is a response to China’s precision, long-range missiles, which could hit US aircraft parked on the tarmac. To avoid losses on the ground, the USAF plans to fly from a greater number of air bases, of sizes small and large, so as to increase the number of targets an adversary would need to attack.

However, the agile-basing plan requires the service to constantly keep its aircraft on the move, so that the Chinese military doesn’t have time to spot and attack US jets [emphasis added].

“The ACE concept is basically having a jet land [at a remote location], then a team of maintainers re-arms and refuels the jet, and sends it back into the fight as quickly as possible,” says Master Sargent Edmund Nicholson of 67th aircraft maintenance unit, which is based at Kadena air base in Japan. He explained the concept via an USAF media release about an agile combat exercise at Fort Greely, Alaska in August 2019.

In order for a jet to land at a remote island air strip – a runway without the usual navigation and air traffic control infrastructure – the USAF needs portable equipment. The service wants its SF-PALC system to be small enough to fit onto one 463L pallet, which would be airlifted inside one Lockheed Martin C-130H cargo transport. The system must also be able to be setup and operated in a GPS-denied environment, says the USAF.

The SF-PALC system requirement comes after the US Navy awarded Raytheon a $235 million contract for 23 Joint Precision Approach and Landing Systems (JPALS) in May 2019. JPALS is a differential, GPS-based precision landing system that guides aircraft to a landing spot, typically on an aircraft carrier deck, though a land-based expeditionary unit is in development as well.

The navigation equipment is integrated into the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II and will be installed on the in-development Boeing MQ-25A Stingray unmanned in-flight refuelling vehicle. Raytheon has said it plans to demonstrate expeditionary versions of JPALS to the USAF.
https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/usaf-looks-for-expeditionary-precision-landing-syste-461599/

End of a 2016 post:

Quote
USAF “Officers Give New Details for F-35 in War With China”
...
All that basing thinking has rather a Rube Goldberg/Heath Robinson feel about it to me.
https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2016/07/04/mark-collins-usaf-officers-give-new-details-for-f-35-in-war-with-china/

Mark
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