Author Topic: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)  (Read 479374 times)

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Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1300 on: May 08, 2017, 13:56:15 »
Well, I am going to give six out of ten to my local newspaper here in Montreal (The Gazette) for effort.

They have a picture of a LAV wading through water in the flood area, but called it a TAPV in the caption. There are TAPV deployed too, as I have seen them in the newscasts. So I give them marks for trying to get it right ... and not calling it a tank  [:D.

Offline jollyjacktar

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1301 on: May 08, 2017, 18:59:32 »
Or, a "fish" tank.
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

Offline Good2Golf

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1302 on: May 08, 2017, 22:30:28 »
Well, I am going to give six out of ten to my local newspaper here in Montreal (The Gazette) for effort.

They have a picture of a LAV wading through water in the flood area, but called it a TAPV in the caption. There are TAPV deployed too, as I have seen them in the newscasts. So I give them marks for trying to get it right ... and not calling it a tank  [:D.

At least they didn't call it a "Coast Guard Tank"...   ;D

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1303 on: June 23, 2017, 18:20:08 »
This is right.....  ;D

Quote
They’re Wrong About Everything

Column: More evidence the political class doesn't know what it's talking about

     
BY: Matthew Continetti
June 23, 2017 5:00 am

Events are turning me into a radical skeptic. I no longer believe what I read, unless what I am reading is an empirically verifiable account of the past. I no longer have confidence in polls, because it has become impossible to separate the signal from the noise. What I have heard from the media and political class over the last several years has been so spectacularly proven wrong by events, again and again, that I sometimes wonder why I continue to read two newspapers a day before spending time following journalists on Twitter. Habit, I guess. A sense of professional obligation, I suppose. Maybe boredom.

The fact is that almost the entirety of what one reads in the paper or on the web is speculation. The writer isn't telling you what happened, he is offering an interpretation of what happened, or offering a projection of the future. The best scenario is that these theories are novel, compelling, informed, and based on reporting and research. But that is rarely the case. More often the interpretations of current events, and prophesies of future ones, are merely the products of groupthink or dogma or emotions or wish-casting, memos to friends written by 27-year-olds who, in the words of Ben Rhodes, "literally know nothing." There was a time when newspapers printed astrology columns. They no longer need to. The pseudoscience is on the front page.

Nor are the empty conjectures and worthless hypotheses limited to Donald Trump. Yes, pretty much the entire world, myself included, assumed he would lose to Hillary Clinton. Indeed, a not-insignificant segment of the political class, both Democrat and Republican, thought the Republicans would not only lose the presidency but also the House and Senate. Oops! I remember when, as the clock reached midnight on November 8 and it became clear Trump would be the forty-fifth president, a friend called. "Are we just wrong about everything?" he asked. Perhaps we were. But at least we had the capacity to admit our fallibility.

There are few who can. Conjectures and guesswork continue to dog Trump in the form of "the Russia thing," the belief that the president, his "satellites," or his campaign worked with the Russians to influence the election in his favor. Months after the FBI opened its investigation into whether such collusion occurred, no evidence has been found. The charge itself is based on an unverified and gossipy and over-the-top memo prepared by a former British spy for Democrats.

Compounded by Trump's own mistakes, the Russia story has now traveled so far afield from the original suspicions that we in Washington are no longer all that interested in the underlying charges. What concerns us instead is the possible obstruction of justice in the investigation of a crime that seems not to have taken place. And yet Russia continues to dominate the headlines, command the attention of pundits, generate rumor and insinuations from people who ought to know better.

The certainty of our best and brightest is immune to disproof. Back in May, for example, I attended a dinner with two experts in British politics. These men were not only observers in the upcoming elections, they were participants, and they reflected the conventional wisdom at the time. Theresa May, they projected, would win a major victory on June 8. Her majority might be as high as 100 seats. May's caution was an asset, Labour was a wreck, Corbyn was frightening. At least the part about Corbyn was true. The rest was false, as I was rather surprised to discover when the voters actually had their say.

The list of misplaced confidences goes on. After the initial vote on the American Health Care Act was called off, the consensus was that the bill was doomed. "Don't look now but the Republican health care bill is in trouble again. Again," reported CNN on May 2. It passed two days later.

For weeks prior to Tuesday's special election in Georgia, we were told that Republicans were in trouble, that the polls looked bad for Karen Handel, that a "referendum on Trump" would motivate Democrats in this swing district to support Democrat Jon Ossoff. That evening, cable anchors warned that the night would be long. The race would be close, and winner might not be announced until the following morning. The Real Clear Politics average showed Handel barely ahead, with a margin of two-tenths of one percent. The race was called by the 11 o'clock news. Handel won by 4 points.

What had been billed as a no-confidence vote in Trump's presidency quickly became, after Handel's victory, no biggie. Yes, Ossoff may have doused in gasoline and set alight more than $20 million of Hollywood and Silicon Valley money. And yes, had Ossoff won, this special election would have been covered as a harbinger of the Resistance's coming triumph over the autocrat in the White House. But really, now that the authors of the email bulletins I receive each morning think about it, Republicans shouldn’t be too happy with the result. After all, both Democrats and Republicans have won special elections in the past only to lose their majorities.

True, but Republicans also won special elections in 2001, and expanded their majority the following year. So which is it? We won't know until—and I know this is a radical concept—the actual midterm election takes place. Which won't be for more than a year. And by which time, a seemingly infinite number of things might happen. But come on, who wants to wait? So much more fun to pretend to be in the know, to assert with absolute confidence one's theory about the world, proclaim one's virtue, despite all evidence to the contrary.

"Like a bearded nut in robes on the sidewalk proclaiming the end of the world is near, the media is just doing what makes it feel good, not reporting hard facts," Michael Crichton once said. "We need to start seeing the media as a bearded nut on the sidewalk, shouting out false fears. It's not sensible to listen to it."

As the editor of an online newspaper, I am reluctant to agree with Crichton entirely. There are still news sources, liberal and conservative, even in Washington, that seek to report rather than explain or analyze or decipher the context and implications of facts. Sometimes these publications carry opinions, such as the one you are reading. Sometimes they have a little fun. And that is fine, so long as they are upfront about it, and are "half a step up from Daily Caller."

But please, please, please be wary of the supposedly nonpartisan and objective experts who have looked at the DATA and determined which course history will take. In fact, be more than wary. Run in the opposite direction.

http://freebeacon.com/columns/theyre-wrong-everything/

It may be the last opinion with which I agree.
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1304 on: June 23, 2017, 18:42:13 »
I feel somewhat vindicated. People laugh and criticized when I say the same thing. I'm not an outlier after all. ;)
 
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1305 on: July 23, 2017, 13:24:08 »
And now the News - brought to you by undisclosed sources in the media commenting on their undisclosed sources......


Quote
Try to imagine what it’s like for recent graduates from the country’s top journalism schools when they first hit the Washington happy hour scene. It’s their first time out with their senior colleagues, their mentors—whoever still has a job. Everyone is three drinks into the evening and bragging about who’s closer to some deputy assistant secretary at the Pentagon, or the scheduler for the vice president’s chief of staff.

Gee, the apprentice reporter thinks to herself, in my “Sociology of the Fourth Estate” seminar at Medill, my favorite professor told me that as journalists, those who help provide the free flow of information necessary for the electorate to make choices about how we live at home and influence others abroad, we serve the American people. And now you’re saying that what we’re really doing is advancing the interests of certain bureaucrats against their rivals in other bureaucracies. So we’re political operatives—except we get paid less. Much much less.

The news media is dead broke. Print advertising is washed up and all the digital advertising that was supposed to replace lost revenue from print ads and subscribers has been swallowed up by Facebook and Google. But the good news is that people will still pay for stories, and it’s an awful lot easier to bill one customer than invoicing the 1,500 readers of your blog. The top customers for these stories are political operations.


Quote
Fusion GPS Illuminates the Brave New World of Manufactured News for Hire
News of the News: How the new sausage gets made
By Lee Smith
Tablet
United States

FUSION GPS ILLUMINATES THE BRAVE NEW WORLD OF MANUFACTURED NEWS FOR HIRE
News of the News: How the new sausage gets made
By Lee Smith
July 21, 2017 • 2:00 PM


Donald Trump, Jr. appears to be the latest figure in President Donald Trump’s inner circle to be caught in the giant web of the Great Kremlin Conspiracy. Trump the younger said he was promised dirt on Hillary Clinton, but that all he got in his June 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer was an earful about dropping the Magnitsky Act, which sanctions Russian officials involved in the death of a Russian lawyer who was killed in detention.

If the Trump, Jr. meeting is just another chapter in the Beltway telenovela about Trump selling out America to the Russians through an ever-changing cast of supposed intermediaries—come back, Mike Flynn and Carter Page, we hardly knew ye—it sheds valuable light on the ways and means by which the news that fills our iPhone screens and Facebook feeds is now produced. You see, the Russian lawyer—often carelessly presented as a “Russian government lawyer” with “close ties to Putin”—Natalia Veselnitskaya, who met with Trump, also worked recently with a Washington, D.C. “commercial research and strategic intelligence firm” that is also believed to have lobbied against the Magnitsky Act. That firm, which also doubles as an opposition research shop, is called Fusion GPS—famous for producing the Russia dossier distributed under the byline of Christopher Steele, a former British intelligence agent for hire.

Steele’s report, a collection of anonymously-sourced allegations, many of which were said to come from “high-ranking former Russian government officials”—i.e. not exactly the kinds of people who seem likely to randomly shoot the crap with ex-British spooks—detailed Trump’s ties to Russian officials and strange sexual obsessions. Originally ordered up by one of Trump’s Republican challengers, the dossier circulated widely in D.C. in the months before the 2016 election, pushed by the Clinton campaign, but no credible press organization was able to verify its claims. After Clinton’s surprise loss, the dossier became public, and it’s claims—while still unverified—have shaped the American public sphere ever since.

Yet at the same time that Fusion GPS was fueling a campaign warning against a vast Russia-Trump conspiracy to destroy the integrity of American elections, the company was also working with Russia to influence American policy—by removing the same sanctions that Trump was supposedly going to remove as his quid pro quo for Putin’s help in defeating Hillary. Many observers, including the press, can’t quite figure out how the firm wound up on both sides of the fence. Sen. Chuck Grassley wants to know if Fusion GPS has violated the Foreign Agents Registration Act.

As the founders of Fusion GPS surely understand, flexibility is a key recipe for success—and the more room you can occupy in the news cycle, the bigger the brand. After all, they’re former journalists—and good ones. Fusion GPS is the story of a few journalists who decided to stop being suckers. They’re not buyers of information, they’re sellers.

***

Fusion GPS was founded in 2009—before the social media wave destroyed most of the remaining structures of 20th-century American journalism—by two Wall Street Journal reporters, Glenn Simpson and Peter Fritsch. They picked up former colleagues from the Journal, Tom Catan, and Neil King, Jr., who were also well-respected by their peers. When the social media wave hit two years later, print media’s last hopes for profitability vanished, and Facebook became the actual publisher of most of the news that Americans consumed. Opposition research and comms shops like Fusion GPS became the news-rooms—with investigative teams and foreign bureaus—that newspapers could no longer afford.

As top reporters themselves, the principals of Fusion GPS knew exactly what their former colleagues needed in order to package and sell stories to their editors and bosses. “Simpson was one of the top terror-finance investigative reporters in the field,” says one Washington-based journalist, who knows Simpson professionally and personally, and who asked for anonymity in discussing a former reporter. “He got disillusioned when Rupert Murdoch took over the Journal because there was less room for the kind of long-form investigative journalism he thrived on.”

And now, says the journalist, “they’re guns for hire. They were hired to dig up dirt on donors to Mitt Romney’s campaign, they were hired by Planned Parenthood after a video exposing some of the organization’s controversial practices.”

Besides Russia, Fusion GPS has also worked with other foreign countries, organizing campaigns and creating news that furthers the aims of the people who pay for their services—using the fractured playing field of “news” to extend old-fashioned lobbying efforts in a way that news consumers have been slow to understand.

Fusion GPS, according to the company’s website, offers “a cross-disciplinary approach with expertise in media, politics, regulation, national security, and global markets.” What does that mean, exactly? “They were hired by a sheikh in the UAE after he was toppled in a coup and waged an information war against his brother,” one well-respected reporter who has had dealings with the company told me. “I believe they seeded the New Yorker story about the Trump Hotel in Azerbaijan with alleged connections to the IRGC. They may have been hired to look into Carlos Slim. It’s amazing how much copy they generate. They’re really effective.”

Yet it is rare to read stories about comms shops like Fusion GPS because traditional news organizations are reluctant to bite the hands that feed them. But they are the news behind the news—well known to every D.C. beat reporter as the sources who set the table and provide the sources for their big “scoops.” The ongoing transformation of foundering, profitless news organizations into dueling proxies for partisan comms operatives is bad news for American readers, and for our democracy. But it is having a particularly outsized effect on reporting in the area of foreign policy, where expert opinion is prized—and easily bought—and most reporters and readers are only shallowly informed.

***

For the past seven years, I’ve reported on and written about American foreign policy and what I saw as troubling trends in how we describe and debate our relationship to the rest of the world. What I’ve concluded during that period is that the fractious nature of those arguments—over the Iran Deal, for instance, or the war in Syria, or Russia’s growing role in the Middle East and elsewhere—is a symptom of a problem here at home. The issue is not about this or that foreign policy. Rather, the problem is that the mediating institutions that enabled Americans to debate and decide our politics and policies, here and abroad, are deeply damaged, likely beyond repair.

The shape of the debate over the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action illustrated this most clearly. The Obama White House turned the press into an instrument used not only to promote its initiatives, but also to drown out and threaten and shame critics and potential opponents, even within the president’s own party. Given the financial exigencies of a media whose business model had been broken by the internet, mismanagement, and the rise of social media as the dominant information platform, the prestige press sacrificed its independence for access to power. If for instance, your beat was national security, it was difficult at best to cross the very few sources of power in Washington that controlled access to information. Your job depended on it. And there are increasingly fewer jobs in the press.

Ironically, the seeds of the moral and physical collapse of the American press were planted at the moment of its greatest popular triumph—All the President’s Men. Not the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, but the 1976 film lionizing the work of journalists whose big story about the Watergate break-in and cover-up was based on information provided by a government official, who steered their reporting until he brought down the President of the United States. Oh sure, have it your way, Mark Felt—aka “Deep Throat”—was a whistleblower, a man of conscience serving the people he protected for decades as a federal agent. But he was also a man who wanted to become Director of the FBI, and became furious at Nixon for snubbing him for the top job. In other words, the hero of this epic tale was an embittered law enforcement official who instead of going public with what he knew about a crime, manipulated a vital American institution, the free press, to pay back his boss, while the reporters manfully withheld that information from their readers.

This is to take nothing away from the sedulous and detailed reporting of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. But the lesson of Watergate has been imprinted on two generations of journalists, and it was only a matter of time before it was raised to the level of a virtue in the Obama years—if you want to break real news, you need to ingratiate yourself with the mid to high-level officials who are in position to leak it to you. And then, the bottom fell out of the news business.

Try to imagine what it’s like for recent graduates from the country’s top journalism schools when they first hit the Washington happy hour scene. It’s their first time out with their senior colleagues, their mentors—whoever still has a job. Everyone is three drinks into the evening and bragging about who’s closer to some deputy assistant secretary at the Pentagon, or the scheduler for the vice president’s chief of staff.

Gee, the apprentice reporter thinks to herself, in my “Sociology of the Fourth Estate” seminar at Medill, my favorite professor told me that as journalists, those who help provide the free flow of information necessary for the electorate to make choices about how we live at home and influence others abroad, we serve the American people. And now you’re saying that what we’re really doing is advancing the interests of certain bureaucrats against their rivals in other bureaucracies. So we’re political operatives—except we get paid less. Much much less.

The news media is dead broke. Print advertising is washed up and all the digital advertising that was supposed to replace lost revenue from print ads and subscribers has been swallowed up by Facebook and Google. But the good news is that people will still pay for stories, and it’s an awful lot easier to bill one customer than invoicing the 1,500 readers of your blog. The top customers for these stories are political operations.

There is no accurate accounting of how many of the stories you read in the news are the fruit of opposition research, because no journalist wants to admit how many of their top “sources” are just information packagers—which is why the blinding success of Fusion GPS is the least-covered media story in America right now. There’s plenty of oppo research on the right, but most of it comes from the left. That’s not because Republicans are more virtuous than Democrats and look for dirt less than their rivals do. Nor conversely is it because Republicans make a richer subject for opposition research because they’re so much more corrupt. Nope, it’s simple arithmetic: Most journalists lean to the left, and so do the majority of career officials who staff the federal government. There are more sounding boards on the left, and more sources. It’s not ideological, it’s business.

Thus, most of Fusion GPS’s contracts seem to come from the left—except for its most famous project, the Russia dossier. Before it was passed on to the Democrats, it started on the right, when one Republican candidate—thought to be Jeb Bush but never confirmed—hired the outfit to amass damning material on Trump. From humble beginnings, it has taken on the shape of a modern-day legend.

Plugging in various members of the president’s circle as possible accomplices—including his former national security adviser Mike Flynn, Carter Page, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, and now Donald Trump, Jr.—the narrative has led the news, print and broadcast, nearly every day for seven months. The Great Kremlin Conspiracy has fueled the energies of the anti-Trump resistance and turned obscure twitter feeds into folk heroes. More importantly, it has helped obstruct the legislative and political agenda of an administration that has had no shortage of big problems of its own making without also being the target of what has turned out to be most innovative and successful campaign of political warfare in recent memory.

The Trump-Russia story has frequently been likened to Watergate, a specious comparison since the latter started with evidence of a crime and the former with publication of an anthology of fables, pornography, and Russian-sourced disinformation put together and distributed by partisan political operatives. The salient comparison is rather in the effect—it has the same feel as Watergate. And it’s taking up the same space as Watergate—and that’s because comms shops-for-hire like Fusion GPS have assumed the role that the American press used to occupy.

***

Brickbats and Bouquets


On Wednesday, three major news organization published variations of the same story—about the line of succession to the Saudi throne. It seems that in June the son of King Salman, Mohammed Bin Salman, muscled his cousin Mohammed Bin Nayef out of the way to become the Crown Prince and next in line.

It’s a juicy narrative with lots of insider-y details about Saudi power politics, drug addiction, and the ambitions of a large and very wealthy family, but the most salient fact is that the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Reuters published what was essentially the same story, with minor variations, on the same day—not a breaking news story, but an investigative feature.

In other words, these media organizations were used as part of an information campaign targeting Riyadh, for as yet unknown reasons. Who’s behind it? Maybe an opposition research shop like Fusion GPS, or a less formal gathering of interests, like Saudi opponents foreign and domestic, as well as American intelligence officials.

It’s certainly embarrassing to be played for the sucker and see what you likely assumed was a scoop break in two other outlets the very same day, and some of the bylines involved are capable and talented journalists. But it’s perhaps worst for the New York Times, which was compelled to run what amounted to an article-length correction the next day, under the headline, “Saudi Official Who Was Thought to Be Under House Arrest Receives a Promotion.” On Wednesday, the Times reported that Gen. Abdulaziz al-Huwairini had been put under house arrest by a faction loyal to Mohammed Bin Salman. On Thursday, the Times reported that he was in fact named head of a government body overseeing domestic security and counterterrorism issues.


Still, the Times published what was far and away the best piece of foreign news reporting this week, Tim Arango’s July 15 feature, “Iran Dominates in Iraq After US ‘Handed the Country Over.’ ” It’s a terrifically well-reported and well-written piece explaining how the administrations of George W. Bush and Barack Obama are both to blame for bungling one of the costliest and most controversial foreign engagements in American history.

http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/241381/news-of-the-news

Somebody argued that the American Constitution required Freedom of the Press - and that consequently the Institution of the Press had peculiar standing in American politics.

I countered that freedom of the press is the freedom granted to every individual to utter their commentary and beliefs unhindered except by laws on sedition and libel.  There is no allowance for the Institution of the Press in Original America - anymore than there is allowance for the entrenched bureaucracies of the FBI, CIA, State Department, EPA or any of the others.  They are all employees of the Executive branch whose Chief Officer is turned over, by design, every 4 years.

I still stand by that and suggest, with many others, that what we are witnessing is the realization of a small number of people, who thought they had the system figured out to their benefit, that control is being wrested from them.

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Online Chris Pook

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1306 on: July 23, 2017, 13:43:22 »
Similar vein - from the Guardian

Of Politico's Playbook, Lally Weymouth's guest list,  The Gang of 500 and respectable legitimacy.

The world of France's Salons https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salon_(France)

And a world away from Burns's Masons, though perhaps not so far away from Edinburgh's Select Society and the Poker Club.

Quote
The media's war on Trump is destined to fail. Why can't it see that?
Thomas Frank

The news media needs to win its war with Trump, and urgently so. But the goal should be more than just reestablishing the old rules of legitimacy

Friday 21 July 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Friday 21 July 2017 11.01 BST

....

The people of the respectable east coast press loathe the president with an amazing unanimity. ...

The news media’s alarms about Trump have been shrieking at high C for more than a year.... the profession’s collective understanding of Trump as a political mutation – an unacceptable deviation from the two-party norm – that journalists must cleanse from the political mainstream.

It hasn’t worked. ....And the news media’s reputation sinks lower and lower as they advance into their golden age.


What explains this dazzling disconnect?....

One part of the explanation is the structural situation of the news media. As newspapers die off, their place in the American consciousness is taken by social networks of both the formal and informal variety. Thanks to Facebook and Twitter, these days we read only that which confirms our biases. (Interjection: - This from a Guardianista who plays in the same pond as the Telegraph - confirmation bias is endemic to the British Press).  Once upon a time, perhaps, the Washington Post could single-handedly bring down a president, but those days have passed.

But there’s also a second reason, one that is even more fundamental. The truth is that the unanimous anti-Trumpness of the respectable press is just one facet of a larger homogeneity. As it happens, the surviving press in this country is unanimous about all sorts of things.

There are their views on trade. Or their views on what they call “populism”. Or their views on what they call “bipartisanship”. Or their views on just about anything having to do with the decline of manufacturing (sad but inevitable) and the rise of the “creative” white-collar professions (the smart ones, so meritorious).

This is one of the factors that explains the many monstrous journalism failures of the last few decades: the dot-com bubble, which was actively cheered on by the business press; the Iraq war, which was abetted by journalism’s greatest sages; the almost complete failure to notice the epidemic of professional misconduct that made possible the 2008 financial crisis and the rise of Donald Trump, which (despite the media’s morbid fascination with the man) caught nearly everyone flatfooted.

Everything they do, they do as a herd – even when it’s running headlong over a cliff.


They still cannot suppress their admiration for bankers. Just the other week, for example, the New York Times’s Dealbook section could be found marveling at how one of the senior officers of Goldman Sachs (“possibly the most powerful investment bank in the world”) likes to DJ in his spare time.

They are endless suckers for credentialing, especially of the foreign policy variety. Last Friday, the Washington Post ran a profile of Hillary Clinton’s former foreign policy adviser, whom they caught up with giving a talk at Yale, his alma mater.

The paper told how the adviser “ran through a list of his early mentors”, including eminent personages from Brookings, the State Department and the Council on Foreign Relations, and then turned to the inevitable matter of Clinton’s loss, a subject so bittersweet you could almost see the tears streaming down readers’ faces as they were prompted to recall, yet again, the ingratitude of a nation that had rejected her team of brilliants for the buffoon Trump.

Similar examples could be piled up by the dozens, if not the thousands. The American news media’s respect for tech CEOs and foreign-policy experts are the photographic negative of their overwhelming contempt for Dumb Donald.

These things don’t happen because the journalists that remain are liberals. It happens because so many of them are part of the same class – an exalted and privileged class. They are professionals and they believe in the things that so many other professional groups believe in: consensus, “realism”, credentialing, the wisdom of their fellow professionals and (of course) the stupidity of the laity.


This is the key to understanding many of their biases – and also for understanding why they are so utterly oblivious to how they appear to the rest of America.


What do I mean? Consider Politico’s famous email tip-sheet, Playbook, which is read religiously every morning by countless members of the DC press corps, including myself. About two-thirds of the publication consists of useful summaries of the day’s news stories.

The rest, however, is a sort of People magazine for the Washington journalist community, in which the reader is invited to celebrate leading journalists’ (and politicians’) birthdays, congratulate leading journalists (and politicians) for their witty phrase-making, learn which leading journalist (and politician) was seen at which party and anticipate which leading journalist (and politician) is going to be on which Sunday program.

Nor is Playbook the only entry in this genre. Before there was Politico there was ABC News and The Note, a similar email newsletter that also celebrated what it called the Gang of 500, the happy and hard-partying political and journalistic insiders who supposedly made Washington tick.

These things seem innocent and fun, of course. But there is an unwritten purpose to these daily honor rolls of journo/political friendship and that is to define the limits of what is acceptable.

Like the guestlist at Lally Weymouth’s party in the Hamptons, which was described so salaciously in Playbook a little while ago, a tiny handful of people and publications and ideas are in; everyone else is out.

It’s about legitimacy, of course, and what’s left of the respectable press is utterly captivated by the theme. It completely defines their war on Trump, for example. They know what a politician is supposed to look like and act like and sound like; they know that Trump does not conform to those rules; and they react to him as a kind of foreign object jammed rudely into their creamy world, a Rodney Dangerfield defiling the fancy country club.

I believe that the news media needs to win its war with Trump, and urgently so. But as long as they understand that war as a crusade to reestablish the old rules of legitimacy, they are going to continue to fail. Until the day they get it right, the world will burn while the in-crowd parties obliviously on.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jul/21/media-war-trump-destined-fail?CMP=share_btn_tw

PS - I do not share the author's concern about the world burning (I see the same age-old smoulder) nor do I feel an urgent need to be divested of Donald Trump.
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1307 on: July 23, 2017, 13:53:11 »
http://video.foxnews.com/v/5508220295001/?#sp=show-clips

Russia connection: Fusion GPS, Trump Jr, and Veselnitskaya

Jul. 14, 2017 - 3:15 - Opposition research firm Fusion GPS has been in the spotlight following Donald Trump Jr's meeting with Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya. How are they connected?



http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/07/21/fusion-refusal-co-founder-firm-behind-trump-russia-dossier-to-plead-fifth.html

Co-founder of firm behind Trump-Russia dossier to plead the Fifth
- Published July 21, 2017 Fox News
 
Glenn Simpson, whose Fusion GPS firm has been tied to anti-Trump efforts and pro-Russian lobbying, will not talk to lawmakers in response to a subpoena, the leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committe said Friday.

Committee chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and ranking member Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., confirmed in a statement that they subpoenaed Simpson to appear before the committee Wednesday as part of a hearing about the influence of foreign lobbying in last year's presidential election.

"Simpson’s attorney has asserted that his client will invoke his Fifth Amendment rights in response to the subpoena," Grassley and Feinstein said.

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1308 on: July 23, 2017, 14:09:46 »
http://video.foxnews.com/v/5508220295001/?#sp=show-clips

Russia connection: Fusion GPS, Trump Jr, and Veselnitskaya

Jul. 14, 2017 - 3:15 - Opposition research firm Fusion GPS has been in the spotlight following Donald Trump Jr's meeting with Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya. How are they connected?



http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/07/21/fusion-refusal-co-founder-firm-behind-trump-russia-dossier-to-plead-fifth.html

Co-founder of firm behind Trump-Russia dossier to plead the Fifth
- Published July 21, 2017 Fox News
 
Glenn Simpson, whose Fusion GPS firm has been tied to anti-Trump efforts and pro-Russian lobbying, will not talk to lawmakers in response to a subpoena, the leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committe said Friday.

Committee chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and ranking member Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., confirmed in a statement that they subpoenaed Simpson to appear before the committee Wednesday as part of a hearing about the influence of foreign lobbying in last year's presidential election.

"Simpson’s attorney has asserted that his client will invoke his Fifth Amendment rights in response to the subpoena," Grassley and Feinstein said.

Perhaps this belongs in Radio Chatter, rather than Canadian Politics.

U.S. Politics 2017
http://milnet.ca/forums/index.php/topic,125056.925.html
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1309 on: July 23, 2017, 15:15:06 »
Perhaps Canadian Politics should be dropped to Radio Chatter.

Everything is connected.
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1310 on: August 08, 2017, 14:32:07 »
A recent survey (+8,700 participants) on trusted media outlets shows a mix of media in both the trusted and not-trusted categories - rating chart attched - with more here (coverage of the report) and here (full report).
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Offline recceguy

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1311 on: August 09, 2017, 16:24:53 »
I came across something interesting today. It 'kinda' goes with the above graph, but isn't in there.

There's been complaints about not sharing sources, others say they can't find anything, even when sources are provided, they're often pooh-poohed as alt-r or alt-l and no one believes them unless it fits their agenda.

I'd heard a report that the grits had asked Google to delete Harper from their results. If you've been wondering why you can't find the article(s) on Google, you inquisitiveness is understandable and you would likely say that there are no sources out there after your search, on Google, but you'd be wrong.

I did a quick experiment that will take about a minute for you to try and then you can draw your own conclusions on whom you wish to depend on for your information.

Here's the phrase I typed into the search engines: liberals ask google to remove harper

I typed it into Google https://www.google.com/
I typed it into DuckDuckGo (the one I use most. It doesn't track you or manipulate the results, to my knowledge) https://duckduckgo.com/?q=&kp=-1&atb=v54-3__
I typed it into Bing. https://www.bing.com/

You can judge from the results yourself. Personally, I put Google on the shelf a couple of years ago.

So, before you say to someone, "I can find no basis for your assertions" and call bullshit, remember where you're searching.
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1312 on: August 09, 2017, 17:16:10 »
I got nearly exactly the same results on all three searches. Mind you, I am not in Canada right now.

What difference was I supposed to see?

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1313 on: August 10, 2017, 09:08:52 »
This does make sense to remember as part of looking far afield for info ...
...Before you say to someone, "I can find no basis for your assertions" and call bullshit, remember where you're searching.
Search widely, but read/assess carefully ...

I got nearly exactly the same results on all three searches. Mind you, I am not in Canada right now.
Same here.  Also, I get a similar range of results on the same phrase using Yahoo.ca and Dogpile (meta search engine searching more than one search engine @ once).

A lot of factors can affect Google (and I suspect other) results, including where you're searching from, what browser/device you're using, what seaches you've done in the past, what results/sources you've clicked on in the past, etc.  Therefore, everyone's mileage may vary (sometimes widely).  You can learn more on what affects Google results from place to place and person to person here and here.
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1314 on: August 10, 2017, 09:34:36 »
I'm in Canada.

I tried it.

The order was slightly different, but I got all the same results.
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1315 on: August 10, 2017, 10:21:35 »
I got nearly exactly the same results on all three searches.
Same hereAlso, I get a similar range of results on the same phrase using Yahoo and Dogpile.
The order was slightly different, but I got all the same results.


You can judge from the results yourself.
Yep;  seems pretty clear.   :nod: 

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1316 on: August 10, 2017, 15:21:10 »
I got nearly exactly the same results on all three searches. Mind you, I am not in Canada right now.

What difference was I supposed to see?

All other search engines returned results of the grits request to Google to remove all vestiges of the Harper years, from the PMO files. Google has nothing about it.

I've, personally, had problems finding information on the Harper years, on Google, that is widely available on other search engines.

I only posted to show the disparity in the different search engines and that not all info is bogus just because it couldn't be found on Google, or some other search.

The subject was pitched because that is what I was looking for at the time.
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1317 on: August 10, 2017, 15:57:04 »
All other search engines returned results of the grits request to Google to remove all vestiges of the Harper years, from the PMO files. Google has nothing about it.

I've, personally, had problems finding information on the Harper years, on Google, that is widely available on other search engines.

I only posted to show the disparity in the different search engines and that not all info is bogus just because it couldn't be found on Google, or some other search.

The subject was pitched because that is what I was looking for at the time.

That is interesting. Google showed me the articles you noted above in pretty much the same order as the other search engines.

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1318 on: August 10, 2017, 19:34:16 »
That is interesting. Google showed me the articles you noted above in pretty much the same order as the other search engines.
Same - see attached for top five hits for me.
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1319 on: August 11, 2017, 17:55:20 »
No biggie, my reason for posting was already explained and still stands. What results are returning, now or then, is totally immaterial to that premise really. Perhaps my computer got stuck in a grit maelstrom where Harper doesn't exist.  :salute:
“I am a Canadian, free to speak without fear, free to worship in my own way, free to stand for what I think right, free to oppose what I believe wrong, or free to choose those who shall govern my country. This heritage of freedom I pledge to uphold for myself and all mankind.”

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1321 on: August 22, 2017, 21:07:09 »
The Rebel is getting absolutely hammered the last week. It looks pretty good on them. I think they'll weather, but it's pretty frigging interesting to see it play.

Ezra wants you to help him fight back against the evil out there ::) https://www.therebel.media/stand-with-the-rebel and to show how serious old Ezra is, he's finally going to lift the flap on the Rebel's finances (maybe)

Interesting Ezra's range of tact the last while. You know, not knowing what the Alt-Right was all about and stuff  :-X

Schaudenfreude, indeed.
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1322 on: August 23, 2017, 09:54:36 »
The Rebel is getting absolutely hammered the last week. It looks pretty good on them. I think they'll weather, but it's pretty frigging interesting to see it play.

Ezra wants you to help him fight back against the evil out there ::) https://www.therebel.media/stand-with-the-rebel and to show how serious old Ezra is, he's finally going to lift the flap on the Rebel's finances (maybe)

Interesting Ezra's range of tact the last while. You know, not knowing what the Alt-Right was all about and stuff  :-X

Schaudenfreude, indeed.

Well, if I was ever looking for a job...maybe not.  It would be interesting to work there, but I don't think I could reasonably work for an organization that has a completely different belief system from my own.
Stop assuming I'm a man!

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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1323 on: August 23, 2017, 10:42:25 »
The Rebel is getting absolutely hammered the last week. It looks pretty good on them. I think they'll weather, but it's pretty frigging interesting to see it play.

Ezra wants you to help him fight back against the evil out there ::) https://www.therebel.media/stand-with-the-rebel and to show how serious old Ezra is, he's finally going to lift the flap on the Rebel's finances (maybe)

Interesting Ezra's range of tact the last while. You know, not knowing what the Alt-Right was all about and stuff  :-X

Schaudenfreude, indeed.

I hope the Rebel remains open and active. I think they cover a lot of stories and topics that aren't politically correct and other people are afraid to talk about. Some of their stuff is really eye opening.

Their problem is that they also shoot themselves in the foot because they also post stupid material that looks like it's intent is to incite racism, anti-Muslim crap and crap to just get people riled up. They don't police their social media very well so hateful violent comments can be the norm. I think they took a big hit when they lost Lauren Southern.

Sadly media on all sides seems more about entertainment and supporting X political group than it is about reporting facts.
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Re: Media: Bias, errors, follies, etc. (merged)
« Reply #1324 on: August 23, 2017, 11:19:39 »
I hope the Rebel remains open and active. I think they cover a lot of stories and topics that aren't politically correct and other people are afraid to talk about. Some of their stuff is really eye opening.

Their problem is that they also shoot themselves in the foot because they also post stupid material that looks like it's intent is to incite racism, anti-Muslim crap and crap to just get people riled up. They don't police their social media very well so hateful violent comments can be the norm. I think they took a big hit when they lost Lauren Southern.

Sadly media on all sides seems more about entertainment and supporting X political group than it is about reporting facts.

They have also been caught flat out in lies. So they rail against the likes of the CBC for twisting news and then they do the same thing themselves.

The Rebel is not so much media, but a political advertiser. That in itself makes them even harder to take seriously.

I try to look at them as the whole broken clock can be right, but they continually do stupid things. Like Ezra claiming he didn't really know what Alt-Right was about? That was a laughable moment. And his hush money scheme for the Brits who were going to out some of his practices? And reading deeper into those "financial statements" they are pie charts anyone can do on Powerpoint, not audited statements.

If Ezra wants to be taken seriously then he should work to prove he should be taken seriously. I mean, is there a Conservative left that will speak to him?
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