Author Topic: The Woodworking Thread  (Read 5303 times)

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Offline Scott

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The Woodworking Thread
« on: May 01, 2017, 17:11:22 »
I didn't want to call it "art" or "craft" in the title.

I'm in the midst of prepping to build my workshop. I have the space, 1.5 car garage on the new house. Still have to iron out a treaty between the wife and I over some space usage  ;D but should have ample room to get done what I want to.

I have the basic suite of tools and my first aim is to work with some black iron pipe and live edge maple planks/slabs to make shelving or bookshelves. I like the look and know a few folks who will want this sort of thing as a gift. I'll be going into Butterfly/Dutchman's joints, but I see templates for my router and I have a good set of chisels so we should be laughing there. Later, I'd like to get more advanced, but first thing is to get the thing set up to be workable!

I need to build a full scale workbench and was think L shaped for the corner of the space with a home for a hydration cooling medium, a sound generator, as well as some cabinets for paint and such. Racks to store/dry lumber is a must and will likely get homed with kayaks (her idea, not mine)

The big item, for me, is to build a rolling work table that can be set aside, or placed right smack in the middle of the place. Not sure on size yet, but am nearly certain I'll include a vise and some sort of clamping arrangement.

I also need a dust system and was thinking of this: http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=69841&cat=1,42401 It's cost effective and seems to be set up to do the job I want. I'll need it for a planer, sanders, router - not too much else I don't think. Since the work space will also be the finishing space, not to mention being attached to the house, dust is a concern.

If anyone has any ideas to share re: rolling work tables or fixed work benches I am all ears. She keeps telling me to go to Pinterest but I find myself rather Dispinterested.

I won't "show you mine" as far as tools go unless people are interested, or there is merit to talking about different tools and brands?

Cheers
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2017, 17:16:16 »
I love this idea for a thread!!!!!!!

YOu are also an amazing woodworker!!  I use your Cutting board all the time, makes me feel like a chef!!!!

Hope I can contribute

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Offline ModlrMike

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2017, 17:40:06 »
What you might want to do is to create a utility table that can function as an outfeed table for your saw. That way you get the best of both worlds. There's tons of plans available for 2x4 construction. I would put cabinets and counters along one wall. I would also build rolling carts for some of your medium sized machines that you don't use all the time. You'll also want a metal paint locker for your volatile stuff. That way you only need to roll them out when you need. Horizontal wood storage is a good idea; you can put it up high in unused space. If you're familiar with SketchUp, then that's a good place to start planning. You can get the cyclone way cheaper off shore... if you want to that route, and you're prepared to wait. If you want to PM me, I can give you a list of my Youtube subscriptions that you can check out.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2017, 17:55:48 »

I also need a dust system and was thinking of this: http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=69841&cat=1,42401 It's cost effective and seems to be set up to do the job I want. I'll need it for a planer, sanders, router - not too much else I don't think. Since the work space will also be the finishing space, not to mention being attached to the house, dust is a concern.


Hi

This is truly a great idea for a thread.

I don't think much of the Dust Deputy as all it does is strip out larger particles sending the smaller dust on to the shop vac that you also have to buy. Why not just send everything to the shop vac? It's the small dust particles which are the bane of any indoor workshop and you might as well just invest in a high quality quality shop vac with a good filter that minimizes the small particles.

One thing that I've found indispensable is a good radial arm saw which lets me cut fairly good size pieces of wood. You'll probably still need a good compound mitre saw for fine work like trim etc. One thing I have been able to do without is a table saw because with a little planning you can get Lowes or Home Depot to do the big cuts for you when you buy the boards (also makes them fit better in your car to bring them home) Regardless you should plan a cutting enclosure for your saws to control the dust.

:cheers:
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2017, 19:01:26 »
One site I've found to be awesome for ideas is instructables; they have a full category on just woodworking.  Full warning though, lots of really cool ideas for metalwork and all kinds of other DIY stuff, so can get down a rabbit hole easily.

http://www.instructables.com/tag/type-id/category-workshop/channel-woodworking/

They have a good variety of things that cover both high end and low budget kludges, and some ridiculously skilled creative people on there. Good spot to find all kinds of plans and ideas.

For using sketchup, there are lots of good tutorials on using it for woodworking such as this one;

http://www.finewoodworking.com/2012/03/23/announcing-fine-woodworkings-google-sketchup-guide-for-woodworkers-the-basics

Great tool and easy to use.

Would be interested to see what setups people have for small spaces; I'm confined to an 8x8 area with shelving in my basement in the winter, and expand into the carport when I need more room.  I try to plan ahead to have as much large cuts done at HD etc when I can, and otherwise make jigs with a kludged worksurface for assembly.  Next project is making new kitchen cabinets though, so looking to make some kind of collapsible work bench if anyone has suggestions.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2017, 19:14:49 »
I second the recommendation for a work table that can double as an outfeed table for your table saw. I put mine together using the Kreg worktable system - basically, angle iron with adjustable height legs (which can be mounted on wheels. I mounted a top with an insert, which allows me to replace the smooth board insert when it gets worn. It will likely not allow you to mount a vice, unless you make a substantial top.

https://www.kregtool.com/store/c42/universal-bench-with-standard-height-legs/

The Dust Deputy will strip out a lot of the wood dust, leaving your shop vac filter much cleaner. I have a big Ridgid vac, and I also like to use the "paper bags" inside for collection which further spares the filter.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2017, 19:26:12 »
Love having a table that works with my table saw. Also from the kreg website, the kreg jigs are amazing. I love the pocket holes done with them.

I think not so much the saws but the blades I have for them make such a huge difference. I have a couple of very fine tooth blades for both my table and compound mitre saw. Made some sweet tables with them.

My next project is a king size head board.

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Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2017, 06:33:26 »
Awesome responses. I don't mean to make this my personal thread, hopefully there's more and more stuff on the go forward.

WRT dust: I have the shop vac and have used it for my sanders. The saw is on a dolly system and so I'll just use it in the driveway (when she ain't raining). The big reason for a dust system is the thickness planer, and Dust Deputy seemed to be the way to go for it. I do not have the money, or the space, to go with a higher end system. But I am open to other ideas I might not have considered - like buying offshore.

The nature of what I'll be doing, for now, will see a definite use for the table saw. I certainly wish I could have the hardware store do my cuts, and would consider that for more refined projects in the future. On that note, the plan, as it stands now, is to use the rolling table as an outfeed table for the saw - so same height. Far as a vise for it goes, I was thinking of a Wilton, so side mount, for that table, and something sturdier on the bench. I really like the idea of being able to replace the top on the table, so that will come to the fore.

I am already thinking of going away from L shaped and just using the back wall for the fixed bench - that's free up space to be negotiated over and the only thing I'd use the jog for would be a drill press, but that is a small portable unit that can easily live on the floor and move to the table.

All floor based tools with the exception of the bandsaw for right now (and I just haven't figured out a solution yet) will be moveable. Table saw, planer.

My toolkit is pretty half decent. Though I was pressed and had to go for a cheaper option with a chop saw... >:( but that's what Kijiji is for! I had a deck to build and my old Delta crapped out so I went with a Skil, I think (I'm not home right now, hence the time to think about this crap!) Anyway, it's my one regrettable purchase (besides going corded for a recip saw and not battery operated) and so I will likely get a radial arm. Thinking Rigid due to their warranty being back by Home Depot.

WRT blades, I now purchase Diablo for everything. My Dad had good luck with them and I saw a difference right away.

I have a Kreg jig and have loved the possibilities it opens up. I used it to build some deck tables last year - overkill, but fun learning!

First priority is destroying a shelving system the previous owner has in the garage and getting it to pristine space. Next is making sure I have power everywhere I want/need it for the foreseeable future. Then comes workbench. After that I can look at storage and finally the table.

Thanks for all of the feedback!

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Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2017, 09:13:35 »
I should clarify something:

One of the reasons the Dust Deputy, or similar, appeals to me is that I have the Shop-Vac, and I can use the particles for fire starting. If it works really well, I may find use for maple shavings in my smoker - though I'd be wary at first in case I get doghair or something in there :-X
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Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2017, 10:28:07 »
Scott:

I have a Dust Deputy that I paired with the recycled central vac system I use in the garage for woodworking and I have been very satisfied with the combination. My old central vac get clogged a lot less frequently now. And for wood storage, I acquired from Canadian Tire a few extra tire storage racks: I installed them in line with one another near the top of the back wall and, when not in use, they fold away. When I need to store wood, I lower just the number I need for the length of wood I store and as they don't have flat surfaces to get in the way, the wood stays nice and dry with good air circulation around it.

As for FJAG, I don't know what type of woodworking you concentrate on, but in my case I do a lot of cabinetry work (custom built the kitchen - twice by now - with complex highly decorative woodwork on the doors, drawers and edges. I don't know how I could have done it without a high end table saw, that doubled as a dado or groove maker and moulding head, or to make tapered cuts on legs of tables and cabinets. To each his own - but I for one can't live without it.  :nod: 

Offline Big Spoon

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2017, 10:37:40 »
I will say that this thread makes me feel insignificant in my woodworking space. I have been relegated to having only an outdoor workshop which makes me extremely weather dependent and really only allows for jobs that can be completed in a short time or are small enough that i can move them inside.

But the positive side of this is that I find woodworking a great way to relieve stress at the end of a hard day/week.

Offline Gizmo 421

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2017, 11:26:32 »
An assembly table that can double as an out feed comes in handy, you can also make your own bench vice using pipe clamps.
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Offline Gizmo 421

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2017, 11:30:19 »
You can also make your own cyclone mine works alright only the smallest particles make it to the vac, a washable good quality filter for your vac is essential.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Tz_9HDW3Hg

Edit: to add a link
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 11:33:35 by Gizmo 421 »
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2017, 11:49:59 »
I will say that this thread makes me feel insignificant in my woodworking space. I have been relegated to having only an outdoor workshop which makes me extremely weather dependent and really only allows for jobs that can be completed in a short time or are small enough that i can move them inside.

But the positive side of this is that I find woodworking a great way to relieve stress at the end of a hard day/week.

Dude, I had been in a cramped basement room and doing "dirty" work outside on nice days for the last six years - all in time, or with imagination!

An assembly table that can double as an out feed comes in handy, you can also make your own bench vice using pipe clamps.

Holy frig, THAT is why I started this thread! That is an utterly brilliant idea for the vice!

With that, let me explain my own experience a little: very much an "as needed" tool buyer. I usually only purchase when I can absorb the cost through a project - which makes her happy. I have been tinkering with smaller projects for years now, but doing all in a very analog fashion. So seeing things like using pipe clamps, which I have a shitload of, for a vice is something I will bank on. Hopefully more of that experienced based info coming for this thread, for all sorts of other ideas!

I also like the idea of making my own dust separator. Might just go with that.

Cheers
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Offline Gizmo 421

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2017, 12:07:45 »
Totally forgot to give credit for the bench vice to Jay Bates
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeprY3nwH9w
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2017, 12:15:46 »
Scott:

As for FJAG, I don't know what type of woodworking you concentrate on, but in my case I do a lot of cabinetry work (custom built the kitchen - twice by now - with complex highly decorative woodwork on the doors, drawers and edges. I don't know how I could have done it without a high end table saw, that doubled as a dado or groove maker and moulding head, or to make tapered cuts on legs of tables and cabinets. To each his own - but I for one can't live without it.  :nod:

By far the most that I've done is construction level (including building a 300 sq ft extension to my last house). Most of my finishing work has been in the way of doors, baseboards, moulding etc. My last project was probably the one closest to finishing cabinetry in that we bought an old hutch and buffet combo at the local "antiques" shop, totally tore it apart ripped off all the curlicues and ornate googads and rebuilt it into a much more modern, separated unit.

My father in law was a great furniture builder and I know his table saw, jointer and planer were the basic tools that he lived by.

Just as an aside, Gizmo 421's post has me totally rethinking that cyclone system. I'm still pretty sure I won't buy a Dust Deputy but the hand made one looks like the way I'll go.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2017, 12:19:19 »
My father in law was a great furniture builder and I know his table saw, jointer and planer were the basic tools that he lived by.

My junior high shop teacher would agree. I do, too. The jointer is a ways off tho!

Quote
Just as an aside, Gizmo 421's post has me totally rethinking that cyclone system. I'm still pretty sure I won't buy a Dust Deputy but the hand made one looks like the way I'll go.

:cheers:

Hands down one of the single most helpful posts I have ever benefited from here. I can't wait to get all the other work done so I can implement this.

And those pipe clamps are going to be a part of the table. In fact, I see no reason to set two sides (long and end) up just the same. Completely brilliant.
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Offline Gizmo 421

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2017, 12:24:57 »
I have only returned to woodworking within the last year after being away from it for an extended period find I have to relearn most everything projects I have been working on lately are Yardzee dice and Pet Leash Hangers, I have to agree that it is very relaxing after work to go out to the shop and make some sawdust.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2017, 12:28:57 »
We bought a couple of the Honeywell AirGenius3 Air Cleaners for our house. After we set up a workshop in the basement, we discovered a need to place them in the basement to keep the dust down. What I like the most about the air purifier are the permanent air filters. At the end of the day, we just have to wash, rinse, and air dry the filters overnight. We also have a good quality shop vac.
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Offline sidemount

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #19 on: May 02, 2017, 12:45:09 »
My new fav thread haha


Is it just me or does anyone else just love the smell of sawdust when you are working.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #20 on: May 02, 2017, 12:47:59 »
Freaking dust can be a huge problem for myself especially in winter when I can't open the workshop doors, I'm a big fan of build your own if you can so I used a modified version of this one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5csWbjg5w4w to build an air cleaner with an old 16" fan I had kicking around I usually use a standard furnace filter for the primary and a MERV 8 or 11 for the secondary (the plans were modified to fit my house furnace filter size.

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Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2017, 17:09:58 »
My new fav thread haha


Is it just me or does anyone else just love the smell of sawdust when you are working.

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No doubt the smell of wood being worked on is great, but Big Spoon hit on one of the two main reasons we do woodworking: It relieves stress like nothing else; the second reason of course being that it gives us an excuse to get away from the Commander Home Fleet that she can't argue with because the loves the results.  ;D

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2017, 17:12:48 »
That fan idea is the bomb. I'll consider that once further down the road. The wife will always love an idea that eradicates dust.

Now: any ideas specific to a thickness planer? You guys with the cyclones, do you use it for planing? Or just wing the stuff into a box?
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #23 on: May 02, 2017, 17:55:55 »
No doubt the smell of wood being worked on is great, but Big Spoon hit on one of the two main reasons we do woodworking: It relieves stress like nothing else; the second reason of course being that it gives us an excuse to get away from the Commander Home Fleet that she can't argue with because the loves the results.  ;D
Haha aint that the truth. I also love when 9er domestic makes a specific request and I use it as an excuse to get some new tools :D



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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2017, 18:44:50 »
Haha aint that the truth. I also love when 9er domestic makes a specific request and I use it as an excuse to get some new tools :D



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I'm reasonably certain I've got the go ahead to buy a press brake and try and make metal kitchen cabinets.  Toying with the idea, but essentially would bend sheet to make some facing for the drawers and doors with some kind of wood core (plywood? project pine?).  May double it over on the edges to get a front and back but not sure how clean the corners would be.  I think some trial and error is probably the best bet, but always liked the old metal kitchen cabinets they had in the 30s and 40s, and this seems like fun.

Failing that, planning on standard wooden cabinets and drawers, probably in some kind of arts and crafts style with stained glass for the larger doors.

Incidentally, stained glass is surprisingly relaxing as well; also have plans for some large light boxes with custom stained glass panels, so combines both basic woodworking and stained glass.

Personally I've had good luck with a good chop saw, power saw, drill and some basic hand tools.  Over the years I've picked up a contractors table saw and a router with a whack of bits from kijiji for steals, as well as a reasonable collection of clamps etc, but nothing fancy.  Brands are funny in that there is a wide variety in the same brand.  The makita power saw I bought happens to have a motor made in Japan and is a pleasure to use; almost identical model with a motor from china is a bit of a lemon from reviews online, so it's hard to judge by brand alone now.  Most of my hand tools are mastercraft, and they are more than good enough for what I use them for.  If you do some reading, people manage some remarkable things with very basic set ups and a lot of creative jigs.

Another good option for tools is renting them if you have a specific project.  Home depots have big selections, and there are lots of other good places in most cities.  I have found it a great option for getting some of the more expensive tools (like a good random orbit sander, wet tile saws, big sliding mitre compound saws) for something specific where I may not want to buy, and you can try out all kinds of different brands as well.  Doesn't make sense if you use it a lot, but if you are space constrained or not sure what you want it's a good option.  You can also try to find some of the 'maker' shops in your area or woodworking places; you can get memberships and sometimes have access to awesome equipment like large industrial planers.

First step though, I got lost looking through the instructables site and found this design for a collapsible workbench;
https://www.instructables.com/id/Collapsible-Workbench/
I think I would make it larger and modify it to use some bolts , but the idea of it is pretty good.  There are lots of other examples there for interesting ideas to start with from people that also have limited space.

This is also pretty wild, need to try it some time to add some extra details to the finish;
https://www.instructables.com/id/How-I-Make-Cool-Metal-Inlays/
Might not be the most efficient way to do it, but again, interesting read and good starting point for a concept.  (This is what I meant by getting lost in rabbit holes though)

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #25 on: May 03, 2017, 07:18:03 »
Haha aint that the truth. I also love when 9er domestic makes a specific request and I use it as an excuse to get some new tools :D

Yup.

Circular saw, chop saw (the one I'll sell at some point soon), recip saw, router, and a bunch of non-powered stuff all financed by home renos.

Re: Mastercraft: I am fond of their hand tools with the exception of hammers, can't beat the warranty. I also have a flooring nailer from them that has served me well so far - and will again very soon!

One of the things I have been reading a lot on lately is butterfly inlays. I am likely going to suck out and order a template and then tackle buying bushings to go and practice. Since I work a lot with planks, I need to prevent end splits. In fact, I think my last load - about 30 three foot two inch thick slabs meant to do salmon but left unused - might be lost due to me not properly treating the ends before drying them. >:( Good lesson. Thankfully I have some ideas of how to use the (now) scrap: http://www.instructables.com/id/Scrap-Wood-End-Grain-End-Table-How-to-Build/

Instructables.com: rabbit hole indeed.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #26 on: May 03, 2017, 07:33:17 »
Yup.

Circular saw, chop saw (the one I'll sell at some point soon), recip saw, router, and a bunch of non-powered stuff all financed by home renos.

Re: Mastercraft: I am fond of their hand tools with the exception of hammers, can't beat the warranty. I also have a flooring nailer from them that has served me well so far - and will again very soon!

One of the things I have been reading a lot on lately is butterfly inlays. I am likely going to suck out and order a template and then tackle buying bushings to go and practice. Since I work a lot with planks, I need to prevent end splits. In fact, I think my last load - about 30 three foot two inch thick slabs meant to do salmon but left unused - might be lost due to me not properly treating the ends before drying them. >:( Good lesson. Thankfully I have some ideas of how to use the (now) scrap: http://www.instructables.com/id/Scrap-Wood-End-Grain-End-Table-How-to-Build/

Instructables.com: rabbit hole indeed.
Pretty close to the same haha!

I got the mastercraft flooring nailer when it was on sale at CT. Cheaper to buy it then it was to rent one for a few days to do the floors in the house. Now I have one to do floors at the next posting :D


My latest project wasnt so much just wood working but was tearing out an old shower/tub one piece fibreglass unit, reframing and installing a tub and nice tile all around.

My wife loves the tiled look, has gotten me to do a few back splashes and floors now. The wet tile saw was a nice addition :)

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #27 on: May 03, 2017, 07:40:33 »
Pretty close to the same haha!

I got the mastercraft flooring nailer when it was on sale at CT. Cheaper to buy it then it was to rent one for a few days to do the floors in the house. Now I have one to do floors at the next posting :D

Great minds. My initial thought was to do the floors and sell the thing for close to what I paid on sale. Glad I kept it as I have two rooms to do in the new house!

Quote
My latest project wasnt so much just wood working but was tearing out an old shower/tub one piece fibreglass unit, reframing and installing a tub and nice tile all around.

My wife loves the tiled look, has gotten me to do a few back splashes and floors now. The wet tile saw was a nice addition :)

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I have always stopped short of anything related to tile. I have to reconsider for the new place as it will need the bathroom done at some point...this is where it helps having talented buddies who like to drink beer :nod:
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #28 on: May 03, 2017, 17:26:11 »
I guess that's the downside of doing it yourself once; then it becomes the norm!  Nice change of pace though.

I was a bit leary with tiles until I got a friend to help me out with the first bit and realized it was pretty easy.  Have since redone a bathroom, some backsplashes, and planning another bathroom complete overhaul this summer, with a lot of tile.  The on sale CT wet tile saw has paid for itself several times over now!

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #29 on: May 03, 2017, 18:30:38 »
I guess that's the downside of doing it yourself once; then it becomes the norm!  Nice change of pace though.

I was a bit leary with tiles until I got a friend to help me out with the first bit and realized it was pretty easy.  Have since redone a bathroom, some backsplashes, and planning another bathroom complete overhaul this summer, with a lot of tile.  The on sale CT wet tile saw has paid for itself several times over now!

Ditto to that. The tile laying process is very simple if you follow some simple instructions and there are tons of YouTube videos to show you how. You definitely need a good range of tools though and luckily they are not too expensive. I got my wet saw on sale at Cdn Tire for around $50 and I see you can get one at Home Depot for around $77 - for most home improvement projects you wont need one of those $500 ones.

 :cheers:
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #30 on: May 07, 2017, 13:10:10 »
Found this while planning out my summer (need to regrade my back patio to slope away from the house), looks pretty easy.

Also the cut plans are pretty handy; normally I do this by hand on a grid paper (to scale, because I'm OCD like that) but I understand there is software that can do that now.


https://www.buildsomething.com/plans/P5DAC6A8E2D6C2FA7/ConvertiblePicnicTableandBench

One thing I noticed is that they give the actual dimensions for the wood vice the standard framing sizes (ie 1.5 x 3.5 vice 2x4). I think the software probably differentiates between construction lumber and milled boards. 

The site is sponsored by Kreg, so some of their plans have their jigs etc on them.  Having said that, I have their pocket hole jig and it's well worth the price.  I somehow lost the double pocket hole jig and some bar clamps during the last move (hoping the new home owners is enjoying them) but the single one works great as well.

Currently downloading Sketchup Make (the freeware version for personal use) and also came across the builder plugin.  Looks like it can generate a cutlist for all the materials, so planning on playing around with it a bit to see if all of this is any faster than my current method (figure out what I want in my head, measure space, play around with dimensions in head, sketch on graph paper to scale, layout cut plan on graph paper).

I've seen people go crazy and generate 3D layouts of the space, do full 3D models to scale, and then drop them in the space and tweak it on the screen until they get what they want.  Would make sense if I was building it for someone else, but I can do that in my head, so gives me something to do on the bus on my commute.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #31 on: June 04, 2017, 11:33:26 »
Update:

I have finished the teardown of the old shelving in the garage and constructed the back workbench. I went away from L shaped and simply filled in the "hole' along the back wall. Installed pegboard above along the half wall and the upper ledge can be used for storing screws and easy to grab items. It ain't fancy, but it's usable. I have a reinforced section where I can drop a vice in when needed. All in all, the old shelf provided all but about 50 bucks worth of the material, so I was pretty happy with that, and there's leftovers to assist with the rolling table.

My next set of days off will see the rolling table, dust collection and fines filtration built. I have spaces nominated for all of it which will maximize space and minimize clutter. I really appreciate those ideas shared here!

Then the floor tools will arrive! I also have a template kit for cutting letters as well as butterfly joints coming for the router, and perhaps a new router if I can't marry the baseplate.

The beer fridge is alive and well - loving the new pricing on Alpine!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #32 on: June 04, 2017, 13:51:48 »
And now I will ask some advice on power tools.

I am in the market but undecided on a router, and a new mitre saw.

I have a schwack of RBC points who offer a Bosch router as well as a saw.

Details on the saw: 8.5 inch sliding single bevel.

Details on the router: it's a combo kit. Unfortunately RBC rewards isn't great at giving PNs on anything so you can seek info.

This was the router kit I was thinking of: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.dewalt-2-14-hp-three-base-router-kit.1000119767.html

Or I could be talked out of replacing my saw...I mean, the one I have works, it just doesn't slide. A table saw kind of removes the need and I am deadly accurate with my circular anyway. Gah!

Edit: *******, I see the "rewards" router is only 1HP. Not so sure that's going to be much good for longevity or ease.

Back to the drawing board and saving points.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2017, 14:38:59 by Scott »
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #33 on: June 04, 2017, 21:22:41 »
The 618 is a great router, and so is the smaller 611. With both of those, you'll be able to tackle just about any routing job.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #34 on: June 09, 2017, 10:31:26 »
The three different bases are pretty handy.  I built an inset to my old workbench in my last house to attach the fixed base on the underside to use it as a router table, but was easy enough to disconnect as required.

Was this the bosch router?  Seems pretty wee;

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Bosch-5-6-Amp-Corded-1-Horse-Power-Variable-Speed-Colt-Palm-Router-PR20EVSK/202242735

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #35 on: June 09, 2017, 10:56:43 »
Yeah, I am going with the DW and a table will be in future plans!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #36 on: June 30, 2017, 09:35:41 »
Photos of progress:

Rolling work table, same height as my table saw for outfeed. It'll have some more work done to allow for clamping easily.

The other pic is of my grandfather's bandsaw. It's a Jos Cote and near as I can tell they were manufactured between 1938 and 1960, which lines up with when my grandfather owned lumber and box mills where he'd have a use for this. My plan is to strip the parts and then wire brush/wheel everything I can before giving it a paint job. I am trying to get more info out of the company's owners, as well as do some research (which is so far pretty bare) online.

And I have started on the dust extractor!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #37 on: June 30, 2017, 09:53:45 »
Nice! 

I'll have to post up some pictures of my rolling table saw platform.  I took my 10" Delta and mounted it on a 4x6' rolling base, and on one end I added a router table insert section so that I can use the same fence and everything with my router as I do my table saw.

The area under the saw in the base has two large tool storage areas, one that I use for my Miter saw and sander, the other side is 'general' storage of tools and bits.  Easy to move around the garage, lets me reconfigure my work-space fairly simply.

Pictures to follow!

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #38 on: June 30, 2017, 11:27:04 »
Ditto to that. The tile laying process is very simple if you follow some simple instructions and there are tons of YouTube videos to show you how. You definitely need a good range of tools though and luckily they are not too expensive. I got my wet saw on sale at Cdn Tire for around $50 and I see you can get one at Home Depot for around $77 - for most home improvement projects you wont need one of those $500 ones.

 :cheers:

I have been loath to do tiling, but it seems the tools are not that expensive. Maybe I give it a try.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #39 on: July 06, 2017, 11:29:33 »
Got the fanbox built and test run. Filters slide a bit rough, but it works.

Finishing the cyclone right now. Went with the Thien instruction and it's turned out pretty decent. Just no idea how it'll work with only 1 1/2" - that's what my system is, so we shall see.

Bandsaw is back burner. Need a machinist to help with some of the finer rolling bits, and need to well document the entire machine for put back together day.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #40 on: July 12, 2017, 22:08:36 »
Well I have a couple projects on the go. Our backpay just paid for some new tile to go in the newly renovated bathroom. Installing that this weekend. I'll post some pics of the entire room when its all finished.

Also working on a new bedframe and headboard for our bed.
Using slightly modified plans from here:
http://www.ana-white.com/2010/03/plans-mason-headboard-its-all-in-finish.html
And
http://www.ana-white.com/2012/01/plans/hailey-platform-bed
Modded for a kingsize with boxspring so no slats.

Nice and easy stuff. Pics to follow soon.

The ana-white page has some cool projects that ive been playing ariund with

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« Last Edit: July 12, 2017, 22:11:18 by sidemount »
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #41 on: July 13, 2017, 08:03:15 »
Tried my hand at making a Kentucky Stick Chair.
I still have so much to learn.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #42 on: July 13, 2017, 09:39:12 »
Tried my hand at making a Kentucky Stick Chair.
That is pretty cool looking. What are you using to bind the pieces together?

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #43 on: July 13, 2017, 10:21:58 »
Normally 11 Ga chain link fence bottom tension wire, the ends are bent over and inserted into a blind hole to keep them from "catching" then stapled with a fence staple, the one in the picture is 14 Ga cause that is all I had at the time, I have used wire coat hangers in a pinch.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #44 on: July 17, 2017, 22:03:42 »
Well I've finished up the tile in the bathroom. A not so expensive wet tile saw can do a pretty decent job even with the large tiles.
Might as well post the whole bathroom start to finish. I tore out the old counter top and put in quartz (got a sweet deal on a remnant piece at a tile place here), tore out the old bath/shower insert and put in a tub and tile surround. Tore up the vinyl floor and put in tile.




The bed frame is done, just working on the headboard. I'll post some pics when its all finished up.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #45 on: July 21, 2017, 09:47:30 »
That looks great! 

Thanks for sharing the ana white site; lots of great stuff on there.  Who knew the internet had more than videos of dogs/cats and porn?


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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #46 on: July 21, 2017, 13:41:51 »
Picked up my planer. Holy ******* wood chips! Rapidly decided that a cyclone is not required and got a garbage can to direct shavings directly into (lined with a bag)

But what fun! That sound!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #47 on: July 21, 2017, 14:47:27 »
If you like the Ana White site, go on to Youtube and look for Jay Bates. Tons of great projects made with dimensional lumber.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #48 on: July 23, 2017, 10:21:58 »
Thanks for the Jay Bates site!  Some great stuff on there, although I just lost an hour of my life going through it and wandering onto other stuff.

This in particular is pretty awesome;  https://youtu.be/DNFIgqKtL9E

Some fellow decided to make a wooden socket set with wooden nuts and bolts for his grandkids!  Pretty impressive.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #49 on: July 24, 2017, 21:45:10 »
Thanks!

And thanks for the youtube site, I've been watching some vids, they sure do make it look easy.

Here is the headboard I've started on. Its put together and now needs sanding and some planing, then the stain/poly. Coming together nicely though.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #50 on: July 25, 2017, 09:05:02 »
Pretty sweet looking!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #51 on: July 31, 2017, 07:39:15 »
I've got my first issue with DeWalt. Several emails and no joy.

I got the 618 combo kit and noticed that the base for the Lee Valley sign template baseplate barely hangs on. So I asked DW if they can sort this. Got the bog standard reply that I have to send the unit, brand hammer new BTW, to Quebec to have it evaluated. Not cool. Given that these screws are likely a dime apiece, I asked if they'd just send me longer screws to spec - I mean, I don't want to void warranty or anything like that.

Nothing since.

Bit of a piss off considering the money I spent on this unit. Guess I'll thread match and go buy my own, and keep dollars in reserve for a tap and die set.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #52 on: July 31, 2017, 11:06:43 »
Sounds like more of a Lee Valley problem. I notice that they do offer a package of 3/4 inch screws for base plates. It may be easier to spend the $6.50 on the screws than torment yourself over a repair.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #53 on: July 31, 2017, 12:50:09 »
Yeah, I am fine with it but was a little torqued that DW provided a set of screws that might grab three threads for their base.

The kit came with two sets of screws, neither of which fit the 618. And yeah, the base plate is a honking beat thick like.

End of the day I'll likely go and match thread pattern myself and have a bash - as you said, $6.50

Just pisses me off tho!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #54 on: August 01, 2017, 15:38:17 »
Yup.

Circular saw, chop saw (the one I'll sell at some point soon), recip saw, router, and a bunch of non-powered stuff all financed by home renos.

Re: Mastercraft: I am fond of their hand tools with the exception of hammers, can't beat the warranty. I also have a flooring nailer from them that has served me well so far - and will again very soon!

One of the things I have been reading a lot on lately is butterfly inlays. I am likely going to suck out and order a template and then tackle buying bushings to go and practice. Since I work a lot with planks, I need to prevent end splits. In fact, I think my last load - about 30 three foot two inch thick slabs meant to do salmon but left unused - might be lost due to me not properly treating the ends before drying them. >:( Good lesson. Thankfully I have some ideas of how to use the (now) scrap: http://www.instructables.com/id/Scrap-Wood-End-Grain-End-Table-How-to-Build/

Instructables.com: rabbit hole indeed.

I find this kit (http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=41779&cat=1,43000,51208,41779)  from Lee Valley works quite well for simple inlay work.

As for dust collection, I recommend investing in an actual dust collection system.  I find that when you try to adapt a tool, or multiple tools into some sort of Heath Robinson contraption, you spend a lot of time tweaking it to get it to work and then when you need that tool to do something else, you end up having to dismantle everything.  You reach a point where you don't bother doing some things, just because they're such a pain in the ***.  Having said that, I turned my single stage dust collector into a two stage dust collector, simply by adding a cyclone attachment (http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=30282&cat=1,42401) and a garbage can.  I only need to empty this periodically and I end up with a can full of ships/shavings and bag full of dust.  This frees up my shop-vac for other things and makes it readily usable.  For airborne dust particles, I have one of these (http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=30278&cat=1,42401,30278) hanging from my ceiling.  It really cuts down on the overall dust coverage of your shop.

Although Lee Valley is an amazing source, it can be expensive.  You can often find lesser quality (yet cheaper and adequate) knock-offs at other places like Busy Bee Tools.  I try to buy the best quality I can afford in precision tools, but I'm willing to drop my standards considerably for the lesser precision stuff.  For example, my dust collector is a "Craftex" that I got at Busy Bee, but my thickness planer is Makita.  I would normally consider a band saw to be a precision tool, but I took a chance on a "Can-Wood" from Busy Bee and have been very happy with it.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #55 on: August 01, 2017, 16:00:46 »
I've got my first issue with DeWalt. Several emails and no joy.

I got the 618 combo kit and noticed that the base for the Lee Valley sign template baseplate barely hangs on. So I asked DW if they can sort this. Got the bog standard reply that I have to send the unit, brand hammer new BTW, to Quebec to have it evaluated. Not cool. Given that these screws are likely a dime apiece, I asked if they'd just send me longer screws to spec - I mean, I don't want to void warranty or anything like that.

Nothing since.

Bit of a piss off considering the money I spent on this unit. Guess I'll thread match and go buy my own, and keep dollars in reserve for a tap and die set.

CanTire has a good set that is always going on 75% off, every couple of months.   

Oh look!  70-piece set is $159.99 $47.99 this week.  70% off.  Go. To. Store. Now.  ;D

Cheers
Duey

p.s. I have this one, Scott and it does everything I need it too.  I have never seen the Maximum titanium-coated sets on sale.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #56 on: August 01, 2017, 16:30:36 »
Yeah, I have to look into one for threading black iron pipe in the future - paying someone else to do that is lunacy, the stuff is already pricey!

I am gaining some ground with DeWalt. They followed me on Twitter because, apparently, my emails aren't getting through.

I'm not home for another week, so hopefully the sale lasts!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #57 on: August 01, 2017, 16:38:07 »
Yeah, I have to look into one for threading black iron pipe in the future - paying someone else to do that is lunacy, the stuff is already pricey!

Check out Princess Auto for threading kits for Black iron pipe.....really reasonable...
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #58 on: August 01, 2017, 16:50:12 »
Check out Princess Auto for threading kits for Black iron pipe.....really reasonable...

Oooooh! Me likey!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #59 on: August 01, 2017, 19:03:48 »
Depending on how much threading you need done, they'll often do it at the store when you buy the pipe.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #60 on: August 02, 2017, 06:43:20 »
Depending on how much threading you need done, they'll often do it at the store when you buy the pipe.

Yeah, been there previous with projects. Could have been the small town I was in at the time, but there was a charge for it - likely because I am not talking huge numbers. For fifty bucks I can thread three sizes right at home, that ain't bad.

Material is kind of hard to sort, I don't imagine industrial suppliers have caught on to guys like me using this stuff decoratively ;D
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #61 on: August 02, 2017, 10:11:04 »
Virtually all tools go on sale at Canadian Tire at some point.  It's cyclical. 
Patience is a virtue.  Costco can also be a good source, but you generally have to jump on it when you see it.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #62 on: August 02, 2017, 10:23:55 »
Yeah, been there previous with projects. Could have been the small town I was in at the time, but there was a charge for it - likely because I am not talking huge numbers. For fifty bucks I can thread three sizes right at home, that ain't bad.

Material is kind of hard to sort, I don't imagine industrial suppliers have caught on to guys like me using this stuff decoratively ;D

The next time you are home, check out the local scrap yards...especially the sole owner types....they stock all kinds of material that you can bargin for.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #63 on: August 02, 2017, 11:53:06 »
The next time you are home, check out the local scrap yards...especially the sole owner types....they stock all kinds of material that you can bargin for.

That's on the hit list as well.

With a ratchet pipe threader I am going to end up pretty versatile!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #64 on: August 06, 2017, 19:05:21 »
Canadian Tire and Home Depot sales have saved me a ton of money. I don't think I've ever paid full price for a power tool haha!

As well, I finally got the headboard finished. I installed/attached it to the bedframe that I had made a couple weeks earlier.
It turned out pretty good and the wife is happy....which is all that counts I guess haha.


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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #65 on: August 07, 2017, 06:37:38 »
Nice job, sidemount! :nod:
« Last Edit: August 07, 2017, 06:42:06 by Good2Golf »

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #66 on: August 07, 2017, 06:40:19 »
Beauty work.

The next big thing I am costing is a shed for the yard. Seems moving an older one isn't worth the aggravation - given I can't get answers from anyone!

I'll see what timber costs are and go from there.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #67 on: August 07, 2017, 09:09:01 »
Thanks!

I would agree that moving an old shed isn't really worth the hassle. With the cost of dimensional lumber, you can build a custom one that fits your needs and not break the bank....unless you want to go all out haha.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #68 on: August 07, 2017, 09:40:02 »
The next big thing I am costing is a shed for the yard. Seems moving an older one isn't worth the aggravation - given I can't get answers from anyone!

I'll see what timber costs are and go from there.

If you do, build it in 3 or 4 ft sections that bolt together.....that way "shed will travel"
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #69 on: August 07, 2017, 09:48:35 »
If you do, build it in 3 or 4 ft sections that bolt together.....that way "shed will travel"

Been thinking about that...

I have to see my quotes first. I've kind of set an upper limit for a move, and we'll see what we reach with it. The original is pretty well build and nice exterior work, to boot. My wife just happens to know that labor to build a new one is free!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #70 on: August 22, 2017, 20:40:17 »
Finished the convertible picnic table (posted above).  Turned out great, super useful and the angled backs make it really comfortable benches.  When I remember, I will post some pictures, but the plans are easy to follow with great results.  Only difference is I used 12' boards cut in half to make it 6' wide (vice 5' from the plan), so you can fit six people on it if needed, but loads of room for four with room for all the food for serving, so great for bbqs.

Next project is the end grain cutting board; have been making do with a plastic one but getting tired of sharpening my costco set all the time, so figured it's time.  Don't have a planer so will be busting out the belt sander and hand planer, and it's an excuse to replace the bar clamps that didn't make the move.  I figure I can make an unreasonably big one for about the same price as what I can by an A4 size one for, so should be fun

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-SUPER-SWEET-cutting-board/

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #71 on: August 31, 2017, 14:30:42 »
Update on the router: DeWalt supplied me with the proper size/thread of the screws they use before I got home again, so that was sorted.

The shed will likely be built by the local high school. They have designs for everything and I only have to supply materials and a boom truck. Neighbor (a teacher) has offered his driveway for offloading. Sorted (I hope)

My Dremel really came into its own recently: I have been using it to strip bark from inner seams of large birch. My wife found some diamond bits online for about 15 bucks and so I have been drilling beack glass and shells for her. Oddly therapeutic.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #72 on: September 01, 2017, 14:00:07 »
That sounds pretty sweet Scott, I wouldn't have thought off that for getting it built.

Does anyone have experience using some of these wood shaping/planers that fit on a grinder?  I don't have the shop space for any of that (or the money laying around for a quality planer) so thought these might be good to be able to pick up and play around with.

I'm sure there are other companies that make similar ones, but was looking at something like this;

https://www.arbortechtools.com/au/turbo-range/

Looks pretty sweet, so going to poke around for something made a bit closer than AUS if I can.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #73 on: September 01, 2017, 14:22:34 »
If you're looking to thickness or flatten wood without a planer, make a sled for your router. You can get a flat bottom bit and make a frame, like in this video. Unless I completely misunderstand your question.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #74 on: September 01, 2017, 14:26:41 »
That sounds pretty sweet Scott, I wouldn't have thought off that for getting it built.

I'll update of course, it's not a for sure thing yet. Waiting on the neighbor to get back with info.

Quote
Does anyone have experience using some of these wood shaping/planers that fit on a grinder?  I don't have the shop space for any of that (or the money laying around for a quality planer) so thought these might be good to be able to pick up and play around with.

I'm sure there are other companies that make similar ones, but was looking at something like this;

https://www.arbortechtools.com/au/turbo-range/

Looks pretty sweet, so going to poke around for something made a bit closer than AUS if I can.

If you're looking to thickness or flatten wood without a planer, make a sled for your router. You can get a flat bottom bit and make a frame, like in this video. Unless I completely misunderstand your question.

Was thinking the same thing.

I've seen the grinder attachments used for pre finishing larger carvings, like the chainsaw type - and maybe that's what you're driving at for a use? If not, why not Mike's idea or a hand power plane? I watched a wicked tutorial a few years back about measuring, leveling, and stringing a larger piece to ensure a flat surface after many passes - can't find it now >:(
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #75 on: September 01, 2017, 16:36:25 »
Thanks guys, that's a pretty handy setup, I hadn't thought of using the router for that; I can definitely build that jig up and use it for a few projects I have in mind, and finish it off with a nice old hand planer I inherited.  With a sacrificial strip on the edges that would be a quick way to plane the cutting board, and also need a workbench that's higher up so I don't hunch over all the time (which is probably karma for laughing at short friends while going through engineering school who are keeping the design height at 5'6" for everything).

I was more looking at the wood carving grinder bits as well, but the planer attachment would be handy for flattening an area on a carving I guess.  I've seen some pretty interesting carvings made up with layered plywood blocks and thought that the grinder carving wheel would be a good way to play around with that a bit.