Author Topic: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans  (Read 34065 times)

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #51 on: June 20, 2016, 15:02:49 »

Millars Law Fights Discrimination Against Medical Marijuana Users

    May 30, 2016 Criminal Defense, Personal Injury, Victims Rights

 

In light of recent cases of discrimination against Medical Marijuana patients, Millars Law offers representation to all Ontario Medical Marijuana patients who risk the loss or suspension of their Driver’s License and/or work related discrimination.

Last week, Millars Law took on the case of Sam Slaughter, a young taxi driver licensed to use Medical Marijuana for pain issues whose Driver’s License was suspended by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (MTO) despite only using Medical Marijuana to fall asleep at night. This has resulted in a serious loss of income for which the MTO will be held liable.

Millars Law strongly believes that the majority of licensed Medical Marijuana users are responsible, law abiding citizens. As such, we are proud to offer our extensive experience in Personal Injury and Criminal Defence to any Medical Marijuana user who has lost their Driver’s License and/or endured discrimination in the workplace as a result of their Medical Marijuana use.

For more information about the services offered by Millars Law, visit www.millarslaw.com or contact our office in London, ON at (519) 657- 1529 or email phillip@millarslaw.com
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #52 on: June 20, 2016, 20:58:19 »
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #53 on: June 25, 2016, 14:32:40 »

Top 5 Mental Conditions Treated With Marijuana

www.theweedblog.com/top-5-mental-conditions-treated-with-marijuana/

Sufferers of many different types of ailments have found relief with the use of medical marijuana, but most particularly those afflicted with mental conditions. When paired with a good psychiatrist, with an accredited psychology degree, medical marijuana is a very effective and natural remedy. Below you will find the top five mental conditions which have proven to be treatable with medical marijuana.

1. Insomnia

Those suffering from insomnia should consider ingesting medical marijuana. A cookie or brownie can be taken before bed with a glass of milk, and should ensure good sleep throughout the night. Users should be aware that the effects of medical marijuana will not be felt for up to an hour. Medical marijuana is a desirable alternative to addictive drugs such as Xanax, and is not habit forming. Many users report feeling clear-minded and relaxed, sleeping through the night, and having more pleasant dreams.

2. Migraines

Migraines can also be treated with medical marijuana, sometimes better than actual migraine medication. When consumed or smoked, retrograde inhibition will help to slow the rate of neurotransmitters in the brain. This is wonderful news for people who suffer from migraines—all too often, these horrific headaches are due to an overload of neural stimulation. Retrograde inhibition also relieves the pain and other symptoms which attend a full-blown migraine, including nausea and sensitivity to lights. Additionally, migraine medication has been flagged for dangerous side effects, including increased blood pressure. Migraine medication can also be rather debilitating to take, as it makes the user feel very tired and only want to sleep. Medical marijuana can make some users feel slightly sleepy but the doze can be adjusted so that the migraine sufferer will still experience relief from pain, nausea, and hyper-sensitivity, while not becoming as drowsy as they would with the alternative.

3. Anxiety

Mild anxiety is sometimes a side-effect for users, but some people experience mood-elevating effects, as well as a relaxing experience, allowing anxiety sufferers to have a normal life. Medical marijuana can also cause a desirable “slowing” down of thought processes, which can help to break up some of the upsetting cyclical thought patterns which plague anxiety sufferers.

4. Depression

Those who use marijuana once or more weekly have long reported fewer episodes of depression than the rest of the populace, but medical marijuana can also be smoked or ingested to elevate the mood and relieve those who specifically suffer from depression. As in anxiety sufferers, the lasting effects of medical marijuana help to break characteristic unproductive or negative thought cycles which so often spiral out of control for the sufferer until they hit “rock bottom.” Marijuana is not a miracle cure for depression or anxiety – it would not be healthy to mask the root problem instead of treating it – however, it can help one to live a happier, more fulfilling life while the patient works with a therapist to treat the root of their symptoms.

5. Bipolar Disorder

The friends and family of those with Bipolar Disorder will welcome this news as much as the sufferer – medical marijuana can significantly calm the mood swings exhibited by those with Bipolar Disorder. Cannabis works as a mood stabilizer for sufferers. Lithium, which has traditionally been diagnosed for sufferers, takes several weeks to begin working and also causes damage to the heart, kidneys, and thyroid gland. Often sufferers do not like to take their lithium, as it reins their emotions in to an unpleasant, deadening degree, an unpleasant effect not experienced by those who use marijuana instead. The marijuana smokers report feeling a pleasant effect long after the “high” itself has dissipated – this is the mood stabilizing effect of the drug.

In conclusion, medical marijuana should be of note to all those who are suffering from mental disorders, particularly the above mentioned five. Medical marijuana provides us with a safe, natural alternative to dangerous, habit-forming drugs. Many medicines traditionally prescribed by doctors actually damage the body and mind with long term use. Additionally, most people suffering from one health condition or another take more than one medication, and all too often these medications interfere with each other, exacerbating health problems, especially when the patient’s physicians are not in good contact with one another. Of course, when considering any sort of medication, be it marijuana or otherwise, you should be sure to consult with your physician first.

Marijuana deserves a second look for its medical applications. When used in conjunction with a good psychology program, medical marijuana is a natural, more affordable, and safer way to treat many mental health conditions.

Courtesy of the Medical Marijuana Blog
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #54 on: June 27, 2016, 16:35:34 »

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/your-brain-food/201309/marijuana-migraines

Marijuana For Migraines

Migraine sufferers have few options for reducing their headache pain

Posted Sep 16, 2013

Migraine sufferers have few options for reducing their headache pain and most of the medications available have unpleasant side-effects that limit their long term usefulness.  About twenty years ago a new class of drugs, the triptans, was introduced as an effective and safe alternative treatment.  This class of drug works effectively for most patients but must be taken at the first sign of a headache and are often associated with unwanted side-effects such as feeling hot or cold, weak, or "strange" in some way.  The strange feelings are often given the term “serotonin syndrome” and also include changes in mental status.  These changes in mental status can be quite significant in individuals who carry a genetic vulnerability, such as people with bipolar illness or schizophrenia.   The assumption has been that these drugs work by acting upon serotonin receptors leading to a constriction of cerebral blood vessels or by some unknown mechanism(s).  This assumption may be incorrect.

One potentially important “unknown mechanism” that was initially published in 1987 described how migraine headaches developed in some people shortly after they abruptly discontinued their long-term marijuana use.  The implication was that marijuana was preventing the onset of migraines in vulnerable individuals.  In addition, marijuana has long been known to possess analgesic properties.  Possibly, the marijuana was somehow masking the pain of the migraines.  A recent publication from the University of California, San Francisco, in The Journal of Neuroscience, has offered a fascinating explanation for why the use of both triptans and marijuana prevent migraine headaches.

Our brain’s own endogenous marijuana-like chemicals produce analgesia by modulating the entry of pain signals into the brain at the level of our spinal cord.  Future generations of pain relievers will likely be developed based upon the action of marijuana in the body.  The advantage of targeting the endogenous marijuana system is that only noxious or painful signals are blocked; normal touch sensation is normal.

This recent study made two significant advances: it confirmed the role of the endogenous marijuana neurotransmitter system as a potential target for treating migraines, and their results suggest that triptans may produce their migraine relief by activating the brain’s own endogenous marijuana-like chemicals.  This study may lead to the development of more effective migraine prevention and treatment.   The challenge will be to find a dose of marijuana that produces pain relief without disturbing normal cognitive function.

© Gary L. Wenk, Ph.D., author of Your Brain on Food (Oxford, 2010)



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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #55 on: June 27, 2016, 20:05:25 »
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #58 on: June 30, 2016, 11:28:10 »
https://news.liftcannabis.ca/2016/06/28/from-arthritis-to-ptsd-the-most-effective-uses-of-medical-marijuana/?platform=hootsuite


From arthritis to PTSD: The most effective uses of medical marijuana

Research continues to reveal an increasing number of uses for marijuana and its compounds, creating more options for patients


In the last few decades, scientists have begun to better understand how the cannabinoids within marijuana can treat a growing number of health problems. During this time, more than 15,000 scientific reports have been published about the plant’s chemistry and its pharmacology, and another 2,000 have been written about the body’s endocannabinoid system.

This has led to a greater acceptance of marijuana as a medicine by medical professionals and society alike. Marijuana is no longer viewed as a dangerous drug, but instead as a useful treatment for a wide range of conditions, from mental illness to chronic pain.

Arthritis

Arthritis can be a debilitating condition as it causes intense pain and limits motor function. There are many prescription and over-the-counter remedies to ease symptoms, but they also carry the risk of side effects, ranging from bone loss to blood clots. This has driven a growing number of patients to eschew big pharma in favour of alternative medicines.

Many arthritis sufferers have been using marijuana to treat their symptoms for years, but it wasn’t until recently that science was able to verify their claims and prove the plant’s effectiveness. Weed acts as an anti-inflammatory agent, reducing the swelling caused by the condition as well as the amount of associated pain. The side effects of the plant are minimal in comparison to its chemically derived counterparts, making it a good alternative for wary consumers.

Epilepsy

Similarly, marijuana as a treatment for epilepsy was largely supported by anecdotes, but suffered from a lack of hard data to back these claims. It wasn’t until 2013, following media attention on a girl named Charlotte Figi, that the medical community began to study the effects of cannabis on epilepsy. Figi was given doses of a high CBD strain named Charlotte’s Web to treat her seizures.

Several studies have now shown great promise for the use of non-psychoactive cannabidiol strains and their extracts to reduce the frequency of seizures in epilepsy patients. Because these strains have very low amounts of THC, they can be safely prescribed for children, too.

HIV

Much like cancer patients, those living with HIV have long used marijuana to treat their symptoms. The drug reduces nausea and stimulates appetite, and eases pain from the disease and the antiretrovirals used to treat it. Because of this, marijuana has proven instrumental in helping patients adhere to their otherwise painful treatment regimens.

New research also indicates that marijuana could be used as a treatment for the disease itself, demonstrating its ability to slow infection rates and transmission of the virus. There’s also evidence that daily cannabis consumption may help lower viral loads in patients.

PTSD

While scientists continue to research the effectiveness of marijuana as a PTSD treatment, many patients are using the plant in favour of prescription drugs that leave them feeling numb and emotionally altered. Many of those who use cannabis find that it helps to ease the anxiety and depression associated with PTSD, while still allowing them to remain active in their family and social lives.

Science continues to find an increasing number of uses for marijuana and its compounds. This greater understanding opens up options for patients, which could eventually mean a significantly improved quality of life for those in pain.
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #59 on: July 03, 2016, 17:27:24 »
Best Anti-Anxiety Medical Marijuana Strains
   
William Levy | June 9, 2016 11:10 am | 2 Comments
medical marijuana strains

Cannabis and anxiety is a complicated subject as there are many factors to consider when you are choosing from the most appropriate anti-anxiety medical marijuana strains.  If you know the basics however, you will have a better chance of choosing the right strain the first time.  There are some users of marijuana who have had bad experiences in relation to their anxiety.  This is because certain strains can actually make anxiety worse while it works better on other medical issues.

The key is to look out for medical marijuana strains that have high levels of cannabinoids, as this will work best to reduce anxiety.  THC is the other chemical in marijuana that is found in different quantities depending on the train.  THC tends to have a negative effect for those who suffer from anxiety so this should be avoided as much as possible.  Despite this rule however, there are still some strains of marijuana that contain higher levels of THC that can still help to reduce stress and anxiety.

Indica vs. Sativa for Anti-Anxiety Medical Marijuana Strains

When it comes to relaxing the mind, most marijuana users prefer to choose medical marijuana strains from indica to sativa strains of marijuana.  This is because indica has more relaxing benefits for the mind.  By calming your mind, any thoughts of stress or tension can be gently eased away.  A purple Kush type of marijuana strain for example would be good for a sufferer of anxiety.  Indica strains can also help anxiety sufferers to get a better night’s sleep.

Sativa medical marijuana strains really aren’t suitable for those with anxiety due to the high levels of THC that they contain.  THC has a high cerebral effect on the mind.  You’ll feel more alert and uplifted when you use sativa strains but this won’t help you to deal with any feelings of anxiety.  If anything, the way that your mind starts to race will actually add to your feelings of anxiety.  There are one or two varieties of sativa strains that can be used by those who suffer from anxiety such as Jack Herer but there are not many of these varieties that don’t conform to the norm for this strain.

There are times when using indica strains are not possible.  For those who want to feel the calming anti-anxiety effects during their working day for example, indica is a bad choice.  The last thing that you want to do when you are preparing for a long shift at work is to use a strain of marijuana that will make you feel sleepy.  For the times where you need to be fully functioning throughout the day, you could consider using a hybrid strain of MMJ.  Some of these strains are higher in CBD or cannabinoids whilst others have a higher THC content.  Try to choose a strain that has more CBD than THC, as this will ensure that you are alert enough to do your job, but the CBD content will help to calm your anxiety so that you can cope better with your day.

When it comes to cannabis and finding the right medical marijuana strains for you, it all comes down to what works best for the individual. Now that Oregon is allowing edibles for recreational sale, it is even more important to consider which strain is right for you.   You should try a small amount of one strain of marijuana to see how you react to it and then increase the dose a little.  Even though most people find that indica strains and those strains with higher CBD content work best for anxiety, you may be different.  Don’t be afraid to try different strains and different varieties until you find the one that works for you.  You could even try different ways of using the marijuana for example ingesting, vaping or smoking it.


http://marijuanapolitics.com/best-anti-anxiety-medical-marijuana-strains/
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #62 on: July 08, 2016, 15:45:53 »
An OSI (Operational Stress Injury) is a Non-Medical term used to describe a psychological injury that may include Anxiety, Depression, PTSD, or other Mental injuries. An OSI can develop following a traumatic event, combat, grief or loss, high stress situations or from operational fatigue from Service in CAF
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #63 on: July 09, 2016, 12:55:10 »

In Canada, Medical Marijuana Use Among Veterans Is Sharply Up, While Prescription Medication Use Declines

   
July 7, 2016 | MJNA
Veterans have been abandoning the use of prescription medication in favor of medical marijuana in their fight against PTSD and chronic pain.

The use of medical marijuana among Canadian veterans is on the rise, and experts surmise it could be attributed to a better knowledge of treatments options among the country’s veterans.

In a report last month, the Canadian Auditor-General warned Veterans Affairs to rein in spending on its coverage of medical marijuana. The spike in medical marijuana use prompted Veterans Affairs to complete a review and develop a policy for veterans seeking medical marijuana for treatment. Government reimbursements for veterans’ pot prescriptions had spiked from fewer than a hundred veterans, costing just $284,000 four years ago to more than 1,700 veterans, costing the department $20 million last year.

Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr has stated that he has accepted all of the Auditor-General’s recommendations to create stricter controls on the medical marijuana program. Mr. Hehr has promised an update in the coming months to an ongoing internal review of medical marijuana use among former soldiers. However, veterans are keen to abandon pharmaceuticals for a more natural alternative in medical cannabis.

This rise in veterans using medical cannabis instead of prescription painkillers can likely be linked to a decline in opioid use. Opioid prescriptions among Canadian veterans shrank almost 17% during the past four years. Although it is hard to prove a connection here among Canadian veterans, research done in the U.S. has shown that in states where medical marijuana is available for pain, the use of opioids has decreased, with a 25% lower rate of opioid overdose.

Another reason for the increase in medical marijuana use could be a decrease in the use of benzodiazepines. New data provided to The Globe and Mail by Veterans Affairs Canada show that over the past four years, the number of veterans prescribed benzodiazepines like Xanax, Ativan, and Valium had decreased nearly 30 percent.

Benedikt Fischer, senior scientist at Toronto’s Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, said pain and sleep issues are the most common reasons medical marijuana is prescribed.

“There’s definitely overlap in the conditions and symptoms for which marijuana as well as opioids and benzos are being used,” Dr. Fischer said.

While the VA and Auditor-General consider the rise in reimbursements as a problem, others see it as a positive step. There is no national level data on yearly opioid deaths in Canada, but in the U.S. in 2014, there were nearly 20,000 deaths related to opioid use. Similarly, there were over 8,000 overdose deaths in the U.S. from benzodiazepines in 2014. These numbers tend to be concentrated among veterans who had seen combat.

Dan Quirion, a 21 year Canadian Forces veteran, said he previously treated the effects of PTSD with prescription drugs but had better results with medical marijuana.

“Soldiers are turning to cannabis because it’s a better relief and a better fit for them,” Quirion said. “It helps them reach a level where – we don’t like to say normal – but they are functional in their daily lives.

Quirion has had veteran friends who didn’t leave their homes for years, but using medical marijuana changed everything for them.

“They’re able to go out, able to have a rapport with society, and are able to bring back their family. In some cases, they had lost family, wives, or husbands,” Quirion said.

Mike Southwell, co-founder of the Canadian-based  Marijuana For Trauma (MFT) organization, said veterans serviced by his clinics say they much prefer cannabis to the harsh pharmaceuticals they were previously prescribed.

“Most of them have been coming off of over 80 percent of their [opioid and benzodiazepine] medications,” said Mr. Southwell, a veteran himself who has stopped using numerous prescriptions for his post-traumatic stress disorder and back pain and now medicates with cannabis instead.

Although data from the Canadian government shows last year’s marijuana prescriptions cost Veterans Affairs much more per patient, at an average of $11,656, than opioids ($316) or benzodiazepines ($73), Mr. Southwell said these costs are offset by former soldiers doing away with prescriptions meant to deal with the side effects, like erectile dysfunction, of other medications.

“We’ve got testimonials rolling every day: ‘I got my husband back.’ ‘I got my life back.’ ‘I’m able to feel again.’ ‘I’m able to love again.’ I’m able to move again.’ ‘I’m able to sleep again,’ Those are amazing statements,” Southwell remarked.

While it is unclear whether reimbursements for medical marijuana will be capped for Canadian veterans, shifting numbers and personal testimonies show that vets far prefer cannabis to traditional prescription medications.

Visit the Medical Marijuana, Inc. education page to learn more about how cannabis might help PTSD and chronic pain.
- See more at: http://www.medicalmarijuanainc.com/canada-medical-marijuana-use-among-veterans-prescription-medication-use/#sthash.spI6tFmp.dpuf
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #64 on: July 12, 2016, 16:46:43 »
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #65 on: July 16, 2016, 15:37:10 »
https://cannabis.net/blog/personal-story/ptsd-treatment-for-veterans-a-new-leaf-is-turning-over




PTSD Treatment For Veterans - A New Leaf Is Turning Over

Veterans Suffering With PTSD Now Are Getting Congressional Help

Posted by Oaktree on Saturday Jun 11, 2016


Let me preface this by emphasizing that if you suffer from PTSD, or severe anxiety, go see your doctor.




That should be your first stop.  I am by no means an expert but I just want to share how I have handled my bouts with Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

I am a normal guy.   I grew up in a small town in New England where the biggest worry was if the snow plows would beat the school busses on the morning of a large blizzard.  There was little to no violent crimes, great schools, hardworking farmers and a general sense of wellness almost everywhere you looked.

Actually, I went to my hometown University and played 2 years of D1 sports.  Life was grand. I was a hard working student maintaining a part time waiting gig, while playing sports in college and still getting decent grades.

After college, I volunteered for the army.  It’s here I made best friends, learned a tremendous amount about the real world, served proudly and also unfortunately developed what’s known as PTSD. During my service I was  a heavy machine gun operator in an infantry brigade, I was deployed and fought in the Middle East.  It was 2006.

 We had many close calls.  We participated in prolonged periods of dangerous and stressful activity and it affected us all in different ways.  Personally, I hated the war and  the intensity of everything surrounding it. But I didn’t surrender, or search for a way out, because I was loyal to the guy serving alongside me. It was more of a guilty conscious than anything.  But I made it.

When I finally hung up the boots and was honorably discharged, I was ready for the real world outside the army.  Little did I know that my “anxiety attacks”, or what I can now self-prescribe at PTSD, would start to kick in and take control of my life in small but debilitating manner.

The loud and constant humming noise of an airplane engine on an EL Al flight from Tel Aviv to Los Angeles kicked it off. 

It reminded me of the drones that would cover our positions when we fought the insurgents.  Flying high overhead, constantly buzzing, letting us (and the enemy) know that the air force was monitoring our sector at all times.  When the buzzing would stop, the mortars would begin.  Our enemy knew that they had a short window of time to fire hell down on us when and if the drone would switch courses.  It was real fear. I didn’t matter if you were a super commando or innocent civilian in the wrong place at the wrong time, because when they rained down on your area, they were indiscriminate.  And the noise of mortars is ten times as bad as they make it sound in the best of Hollywood.

As a civilian, I was now travelling regularly transatlantic since landing my first real high-tech job.  I remember being very ‘spooked; the first time the stress took over my body and mind.  It kept me awake for hours.  My PTSD, or anxiety attacks were preventing me from sleep I would ware myself out with every possible bad memory running through my mind as I lie in bed awake.  It would last two or three nights in a row, following the return from a business trip.  After a year or so,  I decided with my wife that I needed to get medical help.

My physician was sympathetic, and quick to agree with my self-diagnosis.  Even quicker to give me Xanax to take “as needed” when I couldn’t sleep.




The first few times, it worked like a charm.  I would take one on the flight outbound, and one returning home.  I would sleep 9-10 hours effortlessly and not even recognize that I was a puddle of mush while inebriated.  I could have lengthy conversations before passing out and eventually forgetting almost all I had heard and said. There were literally incidents when I would re-introduce myself to the guy sitting next to me on the plane as we would be beginning are descent following 16 hour flight. That was embarrassing. The Xanax would literally cause me to black out. Forget about how it would be make me feel the next few days; antsy, sweaty palmed, nervous, no appetite and oh wait, in withdrawal.  The benzodiapans the doctor had given me were hardcore narcotics. It took me a while to conclude that they were actually doing me more harm than good.  I was now also fighting the temptation of taking them for fun, or more regularly, because I knew how slippery of a slope that was. 

I did a little research and realized that there were alternatives to taking the Xanax. Some veteran’s forums actually recommend low oral dosages of cannabis before bedtime when the blood levels in the body are as stable as possible. This was perfect for me.  Especially since "sleep time" was the time when the PTSD was at  its' was worst.    My real goal was not to entirely mask the anxiety or PTSD attacks when they would occur, but rather ease the destruction of reaction to PTSD.  Not a one-time event, but every night before sleep.  It was actually "recommend" to use moderate portions of cannabis vapors prior to an inevitable exposure (right before bed). So a mellow hit or two after showering and before getting in to bed, was like the equivalent of eating ½ a pill. I was calm (not too stoned) and ready to sleep.  The side effect in the morning was cotton mouth, and nothing more.  No sweaty palms and uneasy feeling. I was already on the right path.

The funny thing, I remember as a college student sometimes going overboard with smoking and actually developing sense of paranoia. But now, I was actually using cannabis to help calm me down and prevent me from going to an anxiety riddled spot.  If only I had the options to choose from when my first attacks first began. I should thank god, but in actually I should thank a few states legislatures for the progressive stance they had on medicinal and recreational use of cannabis. It literally saved me. I have since discarded entirely the bottle of pills and to be honest, I told my physician what worked and what didn’t. She wasn’t too quick to support decision (but off the record she told me this was just because of the state she lived in and she didn’t want any ramifications that could affect her livelihood and health insurance carrier.)

There is still a lot of research to be conducted on how to best maximize the usage of cannabis to treat PTSD.  For me, I can say that it has worked successfully as my attacks are much less intense and also I am not taking any synthetic, addictive substances to combat them.  I am so glad that I don’t need the Xanax in my travel kit any further. My only frustration is that my vapor pen is not allowed to be used on the plane, but there are oil capsules which work just as well.

Let me re-iterate to everyone reading this article.  IF you, or someone you know is suffering from PTSD, help them recognize they have a problem and there are medical professionals who can help. Suggest the cannabis route if they live in a state where that option exists. To date it has worked for me, and if I can help at least one person by publishing my story then it will serve its point.

Finally, Congress and the Presdent are set to clear cannabis for PTSD veterans on a federal level.  Both the house and senate have approved the use of cannabis for veterans and they are working through Veterans Administraion to get it cleared on all fronts for medical treatment and health coverages.  You can read the story here.

And finally, to all the current and former members of the armed services, thank you for your service.

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #66 on: July 20, 2016, 15:01:05 »
http://healthmemory.info/crossfit-athletes-using-cannabis-to-improve-their-workout/



Crossfit Athletes Using Cannabis To Improve Their Workout.

Posted on July 17, 2016

CROSSFIT ATHLETES USING CANNABIS

Due to stereotypes associated with marijuana, cannabis users are often not thought of as the most athletic people in society. Instead, they are portrayed a lazy, couch potatoes who munch on Doritos all day.  As the legalization and the popularity of cannabis continues to grow, however, this stereotype is beginning to change. It is becoming more and more common to see athletes supplementing their diet with cannabis to aid in their training. CrossFit athletes, in particular, are seeing significant results when they add cannabis to their fitness routine.

What is CrossFit?




CrossFit is a unique form of exercise that has gained a lot of hype, especially over the last decade. Workouts incorporate a wide variety of activities including gymnastics, weightlifting, running, jumping rope, plyometric, rowing and much more.

The goal of CrossFit is to do each movement with as much intensity as possible, whether that be completing as many repetitions in the shortest amount of time, lifting the heaviest amount of weight, or running the longest distance at the quickest pace. When done consistently and adequately, athletes have seen great results.

Cannabis Provides Physical Benefits to CrossFit Athletes:

CrossFit is an excellent choice for athletes looking to gain strength and stamina, but sometimes achieving such high fitness goals comes at a price. Due to the high intensity of each workout, it can be especially taxing and often painful on the body. Many of these athletes face grueling workouts every day, so it’s important that they do all they can to recover from each workout  and alleviate much of the pain as they can.

Cannabis has long been known to alleviate pain so it’s no surprise that CrossFit athletes are making cannabis a regular part of their fitness routine. Some athletes prefer to use cannabis as a post workout aid to help ease the pain, while athletes have found cannabis to be extremely helpful before and during their workout.

Athletes have found that if they use cannabis before they begin a workout, they do not feel as much pain as they would have otherwise. This allows them to push themselves harder during workouts, and train for longer periods of time.




Cannabis Provides Mental Benefits to CrossFit Athletes:

In addition to helping CrossFit athletes on a physical level, cannabis also helps the athletes with mental focus. The high intensity of each workout requires 100% attention. The moves often require lifting heavy amount of weight, which if done incorrectly can result in injury. This is why it’s crucial that athletes remain focused throughout their entire workout.

Many CrossFit athletes have found that cannabis helps them be more alert and have better focus when they workout, which helps ensure they perform each move accurately and safely.

Unlike going for a jog, or a bike ride which use the same muscle movement the entire time, CrossFit incorporates a number of different moves in each workout, which requires great focus. For example, one workout might need, sprinting, rowing, jumping rope, and weight lifting all in the same workout. Alternating between such different moves at a quick pace can be mentally challenging. CrossFit athletes have found cannabis to be a successful aid to help them remain focused as they move quickly through each movement.
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #68 on: August 29, 2016, 21:27:20 »
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #69 on: September 03, 2016, 16:50:19 »






Crohn’s Disease – Medical Marijuana Research Overview
15 September, 2015
The following information is presented for educational purposes only. Medical Marijuana Inc. provides this information to provide an understanding of the potential applications of cannabidiol. Links to third party websites do not constitute an endorsement of these organizations by Medical Marijuana Inc. and none should be inferred.

Crohn’s disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease prevalent among adolescents and young adults that causes the lining of the digestive track to become inflamed. Studies have shown marijuana is effective at decreasing digestive track inflammation and in some cases can help patients achieve long-term remission.
Overview of Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes the lining of the digestive track to become inflamed. The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of American reports that the disease may affect as many as 700,000 Americans, causing them abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, severe diarrhea, fever, weight loss, fatigue and malnutrition. The pain can be so intense it becomes debilitating and in some cases the disease can prove to be life-threatening.

According to Mayo Clinic, the most common area of the digestive track that is affected by Crohn’s disease is at the end of the small bowel (the ileum) and the beginning of the colon. However, the disease can affect any part of the digestive track and will often spread deep into the layers of bowel tissue.

Heredity and abnormal behavior by the immune system are likely what cause Crohn’s disease. Those who have family members with the disease are more common to acquire it themselves. When the immune system responds to fight off a virus, bacteria, fungi and other microorganisms, at times it can respond abnormally and also attack the harmless cells in the digestive track, which in turn leads to inflammation.

There is no confirmed cure for Crohn’s disease, but certain treatment can significantly reduce its symptoms and even bring about remission. Treatment efforts primarily include anti-inflammatory drugs, as well as antibiotics, anti-diarrhea and pain relief medications to help curtail the disease’s associated symptoms. In some cases, the use of a feeding tube to allow the digestive track to rest and decrease inflammation, or surgery to remove the damaged portion of the digestive track, can be required.
Findings: Effects of Cannabis on Crohn’s Disease

Cannabis has been determined to effectively combat the symptoms associated with Crohn’s disease. Cannabinods provide anti-inflammatory effects and therefore offer a reduction in pain sensation, nausea relief and reduce the feeling of unpleasantness (Schicho & Storr, 2014). One study, in which inflammatory bowel disease patients were treated with cannabis for three months, saw improvements in the patients’ general health perception, social functioning, ability to work, physical pain and depression. In addition, they saw increases in body weight and BMI (Lahat, Lang & Ben-Horin, 2012). In another study, patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease reported that marijuana was “very helpful” in relieving their abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhea (Ravikoff, et al., 2013). Cannabis has also been found to improve appetite and sleep in Crohn’s disease patients (Naftali, et al., 2013). In what is likely due to cannabis’ ability to improve symptom’s associated with Crohn’s disease, medical cannabis has also been associated with a reduced need of other medications in patients with Crohn’s disease (Naftali, et al., 2013).

Research also suggests that cannabis may be effective at helping Crohn’s disease reach long-term remission. Medical cannabis use has been determined to be associated with an improvement in disease activity (Naftali, Mechulam, Lev & Konikoff, 2014). In one study, cannabis rich in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produced significant benefits to 10 or 11 patients with active Crohn’s disease, without side effects, and 5 of those 11 subjects achieved complete remission (Naftali, et al., 2013).
States That Have Approved Medical Marijuana for Crohn’s Disease

Currently, 18 states have approved medical marijuana to be used to treat Crohn’s disease. These states include: Arizona, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York (inflammatory bowel disease), Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Washington.

A number of other states will allow medical marijuana to be used for the treatment of Crohn’s Disease, but require an approval or a recommendation by a physician. These states include: California (any debilitating illness where the medical use of marijuana has been recommended by a physician), Nevada (other conditions subject to approval), and Oregon (other conditions subject to approval).

In Washington D.C., any condition can be approved for medical marijuana as long as a DC-licensed physician recommends the treatment.
Studies on Cannabis’ Effect on Crohn’s Disease

        A clinical study showed that cannabis produces significant clinical benefits in patients with Crohn’s disease, including a reduction in pain sensation, nausea relief and reduce the feeling of unpleasantness.Cannabis finds its way into treatment of Crohn’s disease.(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24356243)
        THC-rich cannabis produced significant clinical, steroid-free benefits to 10 or 11 patients with active Crohn’s disease, compared with placebo, without side effects.Cannabis induces a clinical response in patients with Crohn’s disease: a prospective placebo-controlled study. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23648372)
        Three months of inhaled cannabis treatment caused an increase in quality of life measurements, disease activity index and caused gains in weight and body mass index in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.Impact of cannabis treatment on the quality of life, weight and clinical disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease patients: a pilot prospective study.(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22095142)

References

Crohn’s disease. (2014, August 13). Mayo Clinic. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/crohns-disease/basics/definition/con-20032061.

Lahat, A., Lang, A. and Ben-Horin, S. (2012). Impact of cannabis treatment on the quality of life, weight and clinical disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease patients: a pilot prospective study. Digestion, 85(1), 1-8.

Naftali, T., Bar-Lev Schleider, L., Dotan, I., Lansky, EP., Sklerovsky Benjaminov, F. and Konikoff, FM. (2013, October). Cannabis induces a clinical response in patients with Crohn’s disease: a prospective placebo-controlled study. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 11(10), 1276-1280.

Naftali, T., Mechulam, R., Lev, LB, and Konikoff, FM. (2014). Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease. Digestive Diseases, 32(4), 468-74.

Ravikoff Allegretti, J., Courtwright, A., Lucci, M., Korzenik, JR. and Levine, J. (2013, December). Marijuana use patterns among patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases,19(13), 2809-14.

Schicho, R. and Storr, M. (2014). Cannabis finds its way into treatment of Crohn’s disease. Pharmacology, 93(1-2), 1-3.

What Are Crohn’s & Colitis? (n.d.). Crohn’s & Colitis. Retrieved from http://www.ccfa.org/what-are-crohns-and-colitis/what-is-crohns-disease/.
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #70 on: September 06, 2016, 18:22:42 »
Looks like there will soon be a Canadian study that will specifically look at medical marijuana for veterans.

Quote
Federal data show increasing pot use among veterans
UBC prof set to launch first Canadian trial testing effects of marijuana on ex-soldiers suffering from PTSD

Times Colonist
06 Sept 2016

When he opened a medical marijuana shop in Kingston, Ont., this year, Trevor Hands had little idea who his customers would be, how much they would buy or how his business would grow simply through word of mouth.

He does now. Business is booming for Hands, thanks in large part to an influx of business from a single demographic: former Canadian Forces soldiers. A review of Veterans Affairs Canada data on medical marijuana users, obtained by the Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act, suggests the number of users has grown most dramatically in those parts of the country where marijuana shops and clubs cater to a local population of military veterans.

Are those businesses simply meeting demand - or creating it?

Usage rates - and the commensurate federal costs - are generally higher in those areas where the stigma and barriers to medical marijuana use have been lowered or eliminated, said Zach Walsh, a University of B.C. psychology professor.

Marijuana clubs and shops play a key role in removing those barriers, he said.

"The reason we see higher concentrations in areas where it's promoted is because it gives the individuals with PTSD the opportunity to find out that it works," Walsh said.

Veterans are proving well-educated about the potential benefits of pot, said Mike Southwell, vicepresident of Marijuana for Trauma, which helps clients to understand the drug and navigate the federal benefits program that pays for it.

Once cannabis helps one veteran, they tell two others, and so on and so on, said Southwell.

"If a veteran tells another veteran about something that is working for disability, you can be guaranteed that they will tell a hundred other vets." It's that kind of growth the federal government wants to get under control. The government is expected to announce changes to the medical marijuana program in the coming weeks after years of exponential growth - and soaring costs.

This year, the program is expected to carry a price tag of $25 million.

In 2008, when the government first started covering the cost of medical marijuana, Veterans Affairs had licensed users in only five so-called "forward sortation" areas, defined by the first three characters of a postal code.

By 2012, there were 50 forward sortation areas with cannabis users. Three years later, it was 565; this year, 588.

Much of the growth has been around Fredericton, N.B., and its neighbour CFB Gagetown, where soldiers regularly go for training throughout their careers, said Lee Windsor, deputy director at The Gregg Centre for the Study of War and Society at the University of New Brunswick.

Many veterans end up retiring in the area, which could help explain not only why it's home to the largest number of veterans in Canada who are medical marijuana users, but also the region where the costs are highest, he said.

The age of program participants is also interesting, ranging from about 25 years old - veterans of the war in Afghanistan, presumably - to 94-yearolds living in the Greater Toronto Area.

The data also suggest that older veterans are prescribed less than their younger counterparts - likely because younger veterans feel less of a stigma around marijuana use than older ex-soldiers would, Walsh said.

Hands said older veterans tend to smoke their marijuana, which means they don't need large quantities, while younger veterans use cannabis in other ways such as in baked goods, demanding larger prescriptions.

Dosages also depend on a former soldier's condition, be it mental, emotional or physical, Southwell said. A client with post-traumatic stress or chronic pain is going to need more cannabis than someone with a less serious problem.

"As well, everyone's chemical makeup is different - some people require more, while some less. It really depends on the person," he said.

The question of whether cannabis works remains unanswered in the academic literature, Windsor said.

Walsh is hoping to get those answers. He is set to run the first Canadian clinical trial testing the effects of marijuana on veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

For Southwell, the benefits are obvious: his clients feel better and have an improved quality of life.

"A price tag can't be put on those results."
 

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #71 on: September 07, 2016, 16:20:23 »
Looks like there will soon be a Canadian study that will specifically look at medical marijuana for veterans.

Not the first study, in Canada, but progressive.

http://army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,123208.msg1438415.html#msg1438415
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #72 on: September 13, 2016, 11:18:20 »

Decarboxylation is such an important yet misunderstood aspect of cannabis consumption. Decades of prohibition have allowed incomplete, inaccurate, or just plain wrong information to proliferate, not only to the detriment of patients, but to the cannabis movement as a whole.

To shed light on this topic and combat farce with data, we've compiled this guide, just the tip of our research, to address the most common decarboxylation myths.

This undertaking was personal for us, and all about the patients. How can we expand access and acceptance of cannabis for health and wellness when the basics are shrouded in mystery and urban legend? So we decided no more myths - just facts. And a guide to using cannabis better and more effectively.


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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #73 on: September 15, 2016, 16:09:59 »


What are Cannabinoids?

 

Cannabinoids are complex chemical compounds that are secreted by the cannabis plant through its flowers that mimic naturally occurring compounds produced by our bodies, called endocannabinoids. When cannabis is consumed, the cannabinoids bind to receptor sites throughout our brain and body (CB-1 and CB-2 respectively), with a wide variety of effects possible depending on the cannabinoid profile present in a given strain.

The “simplest” description of the effects of marijuana in humans is that it modulates the regulation of homeostasis. Homeostasis is keeping the various systems in the body in relative balance. The balance between inhibition and excitation, bone formation and resorption, inflammatory/anti-inflammatory signaling, fat storage and release, blood sugar, blood pressure, hormone levels; all these systems are held in balance by the endocannabinoid system. This system, though involved in maintaining nearly every biological process in all humans, wasn’t discovered until the 1980’s. Research revealed that the human body contains not only receptors for cannabinoids, but an entire endocannabinoid system that processes cannabinoids. This system allows the body to benefit from the cannabinoids found in cannabis, some of which aren’t found anywhere else in nature. The endocannabinoid system regulates many of the functions of the human body: appetite, food intake, motor behavior, reproduction, and much more. That’s why the plant has such a wide therapeutic potential, and every day more are discovered.

At least 85 different cannabinoids have been isolated from the cannabis plant. For years THC has been described as the primary compound in cannabis due to it’s famous psychoactive effects, but recent research has identified many other important cannabinoids, each linked with specific medicinal effects. During prohibition (the last 80 years), cannabis has been primarily bred to increase THC content to increase the altering effect of the plant, as demanded by the black market. Now that things are changing, other cannabinoids are reaching the medical spotlight and strains are being bred to increase their presence.

Common testing methods provide profiling for the three most prevalent cannabinoids – THC, CBD and CBN, but there are many others to be aware of, including the acid forms of each cannabinoid. There is still much to be studied about this plant and its many components, but with restrictions on scientific research of cannabis slowly relaxing, more information continues to come to light.

 

Here is an overview of the four major cannabinoids that are supported by a solid body of research at this time:

 

THC: Tetrahydrocannabinol

Effects: Responsible for the ‘’high’’effect (psychotropic), it amplifies all sensory functions such as sight, hearing, color sensitivity, and promotes a greater sense of well-being. THC produces strong feelings of euphoria. It sharpens the mind (cerebral) and promotes creativity. THC displays a wide range of properties, which can be expressed differently when accompanied by various other cannabinoids and terpenes.
Side effects vary from one person to another and include: dry mouth, dry eyes, disorientation, short-term memory malfunctions, increased heart-rate, anxiety, and paranoia. Most of these are a result of over-medication and are avoidable with low doses.

Medical Applications:

    Neuroprotective – protects against nerve damage
    Anxiolytic – reduces the symptoms of anxiety
    Antispasmodic – relieves spasms and convulsions
    Antiemetic – reduces vomiting and nausea
    Analgesic – reduces pain
    Appetite Stimulant – encourages eating and appetite
    Antioxidant – fights free radicals in the bloodstream
    Neuropathic analgesic – reduces pain from nerve damage
    Bronchi-dilator -acts similarly to an inhaler to assist asthmatics with breathing
    Anti-proliferative anticancer – reduces spread of certain cancers
    Anti-inflammatory – reduces inflammation
    Neurogenesis – promotes growth of new nerve tissue

 

​CBD: Cannabidiol

Effects: CBD has medical effects but does not make people feel “stoned” and actually counters some of the effects of THC. After decades in which only high-THC Cannabis was available, CBD-rich strains are now being grown by and for medical users. The reduced psychoactivity of CBD-rich Cannabis may make it an appealing treatment option for patients seeking anti-inflammatory, anti-pain, anti-anxiety and/or anti-spasm effects without euphoria or lethargy.

Medical Applications:

    Rheumatoid arthritis
    Diabetes
    Alcoholism
    PTSD
    Epilepsy
    AIDS
    Anti-cancer/tumor
    Arthritis
    Depression
    Crohn’s Disease
    Eating Disorders
    Glaucoma
    Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders
    Migraines
    Multiple Sclerosis

 

CBN: Cannabinol

Effects: Mildly psychoactive, sedative, analgesic. CBN is, just like aspirin, a non-narcotic type analgesic, but 3 times as strong. CBN is a breakdown product of THC. During storage (aging) CBN will slowly increase as THC deteriorates. CBN is effective at relieving tension headaches.

Medical Applications:

    Antispasmodic – relieves spasms and convulsions
    Analgesic – reduces pain
    Anti-inflammatory – reduces inflammation
    Antioxidant – fights free radicals in the bloodstream

 

CBG: Cannabigerol

CBG is perhaps the most under-studied of all cannabinoids, but holds promise of perhaps the most therapeutic properties.

Cannabigerol (CBG) is the “stem cell” for many chemicals in marijuana, including THC and CBD. Scientists first discovered cannabigerol, or CBG, in 1964 as a constituent of hashish. In 1975, researchers found out that CBGA (the acid form of CBG) is the first cannabinoid formed in the plant, essentially the first expression of cannabis’ unique class of constituents. From there, CBGA gets transformed into THCA, CBDA or CBCA by the action of enzymes. CBGA is the precursor for all the cannabinoids we know and love.

CBG also has a number of medicinal properties of its own. Cannabigerol (CBG) is non-psychoactive but still affects the overall effects of Cannabis. Many users find that strains with high CBG have less negative side effects of THC. CBG has been shown to promote apoptosis in cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth in mice.

Medical Applications:

    Antioxidant – fights free radicals in the bloodstream
    Anti-inflammatory – reduces inflammation
    Anti-emetic (vomiting) and anti-nausea
    Antibacterial
    Eases Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    Slows the proliferation of tumor cells
    Pain relief
    Eases effects of Psoriasis

 

 

Glossary Of Medical Marijuana Related Terminology

The Endocannabindoid System—This ancient system found in all vertebrate maintains homeostasis within and across the organizational scales of all animals, including humans, and includes the Cb1 and Cb2 receptors. Within a cell, cannabinoids control basic metabolic processes such as glucose metabolism. Cannabinoids regulate intercellular communication, especially in the immune and nervous systems. In general, cannabinoids modulate and coordinate tissues, organ and body systems (including the cardiovascular, digestive, endocrine, excretory, immune, musculo- skeletal, nervous, reproductive, and respiratory systems). The effects of cannabinoids on consciousness are not well understood, but are well known. These effects also have therapeutic possibilities.

Endocannabinoids—Cannabinoids produced by the body.

Phytocannabinoids—Cannabinoids produced by the plant.

CB1 Receptor—Primarily found in the brain.

CB2 Receptor
—Primarily found in the immune system.

AEA (Anandamide)—An endogenous cannabinoid neurotransmitter found in organs (human and most animals), with an abundant amount located in the brain. (While delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was first synthesized by Mechoulam in 1967 [13], it was not until 1990 that the cannabinoid receptor was localized in the brain [14] and cloned [15]. Since then, discoveries in the field have have proceeded at an ever-increasing pace.)

ENDOCANNABINOID SYSTEM

The Endocannabinoid system is involved in most physiological systems.

    Nervous
    Cardiovascular
    Immune
    Reproductive
    Sleeping
    Eating
    Memory function
    Relaxation



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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #74 on: September 24, 2016, 10:44:50 »


Written By Emily Gray Brosious Posted: 09/23/2016, 03:57pm

Post-traumatic stress disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects some people who experience or witness a traumatic event such as military combat, natural disasters, terrorist incidents, or physical or sexual abuse. Most trauma survivors return to normal after a period of time, but others have lasting stress reactions that may get worse over time, leading to the potential development of PTSD.

Patients suffering from PTSD often relive traumatic experiences through nightmares and flashbacks. The disorder can cause trouble sleeping, feelings of detachment and estrangement, and more severe behavioral symptoms that can significantly impair a person’s life.

An estimated 7.8 percent of Americans will experience PTSD at some time in their lives, according to the Nebraska Department of Veterans Affairs. About 3.6 percent of U.S. adults between the ages of 18 and 54 (5.2 million people) will have PTSD during the course of a given year in the country.

Eighteen states across the country now allow patients with post-traumatic stress disorder to access medical cannabis, and it looks like Colorado might soon be the 19th state to add the condition to its list of medical marijuana qualifiers.

Cannabis can help PTSD patients through a process known as memory extinction. This can help reduce the psychological associations between certain external stimuli, such as loud noises or stressful situations, and past traumatic experiences in people suffering with PTSD.

Indica and hybrid strains are recommended for PTSD patients because they help reduce anxiety and stress, which can trigger panic attacks and depression. However, patients suffering from clinical depression as their primary PTSD symptom should also experiment with sativa strains, according to Whaxy.

Explore the gallery in the link above to learn about 10 popular strains for PTSD patients seeking symptom relief.
I know that I’m not perfect and that I don’t claim to be, so before you point your fingers make sure your hands are clean.