Author Topic: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?  (Read 42050 times)

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Offline Words_Twice

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The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« on: April 04, 2016, 14:39:20 »
 I am not sure if I am reading the legislation correctly, my take on it is that members who received a lump sum payout will not receive the top up until the middle of 2017. After having done a bit of research on the  subject, I cannot find any definitive date as to when this top up will occur. I spoke to my Veterans Affairs case manager this morning , She said it may appear as a surprise Christmas present in your bank account, Which has happened before. Does anybody out there have any more concrete information regarding when we are going to receive this? I received the full 100% back in 2009, with a 126% disability. Naturally, I'm curious!

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2016, 14:41:48 »
No released details yet. That being said, there's a clause about whether the veteran is alive or not as of 1 Apr 17, so I wouldn't expect any money until at least that date, and likely many months after. "Surprise Christmas present" might be Christmas 2017, based on how VAC has handled claims before, and this is well into the 6 figures of applicants since 2006 to deal with....

Offline Words_Twice

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2016, 17:18:37 »
 It would be nice if they treated the disability award top up the way the Family Caregiver Allowance was implemented. In my opinion, that was handled quite well. A simple one-page application, and the money went out surprisingly quickly.  I appreciate that this program was just announced, but the implementation of it would be a very simple matter.  This cynical side of me says that a one year delay in paying the top off would mean a few veterans would die in the interim, saving the government a couple of million dollars ( just like the BS VAC pulled with the SISIP clawback reimbursement ). We all know it would take just a couple of keystrokes on a computer, and the money would go out.  Another bizarre section of this legislation is the delay until 2017  to increase the  maximum disability award to $360,000. Why not do it now? Can anyone think of a compelling reason not to?

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2016, 17:38:29 »
The $360k is a boost to the 2017 numbers, this year it was increased to $310k. This shouldn't be a form at all. There should be a letter and email sent to all members telling them to update addresses prior to 1 April 2017, and on that day cheques start getting mailed and direct deposits are made. There should be 0 forms, other than to update where you currently live, if it's changed.

The 2017 figure was likely to keep this year's budget deficit down. These payouts are likely in the $5B range, which would have put this year's budget over $35B in the red.

Offline Teager

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2016, 19:12:21 »
This is pure speculation but because the pension is still being worked on with an option of lump sum. So it could be possible that the return of the pension is brought in with the option of lump sum in 2017. This could explain why the payment is being delayed till next fiscal year. Or I could be completely wrong.

Offline RobA

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2016, 17:37:06 »
So what about the bump to EL, and expanded access to PIA? 2017 as well?

Offline Teager

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2016, 18:50:44 »
ELB starts Oct 1 2016 PIA which will be CIA is 1 Apr 2017

Offline Occam

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2016, 19:27:13 »
and this is well into the 6 figures of applicants since 2006 to deal with....

Barely into the six figures, if that.

See chart - http://www.ombudsman-veterans.gc.ca/eng/blog/post/250

Offline Words_Twice

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2016, 21:58:16 »
 If the 2016 increase to the disability award is $310,000, I would be happy with a cheque NOW for the difference between what I received in 2009 and the new 2016 figure. When 2017 rolls around, I'll take the balance then.  I don't want to sound greedy, but the difference between paying me the lump sum benefit versus the proper pension I should've received is hundreds of thousands of dollars, so I have no problem and no guilt whatsoever asking for what is properly due to ALL of us. Frankly,  The 60,000 or 70,000 top up is still a fairly modest amount, when compared to other NATO countries injured veterans compensation schemes. I wonder what stand Equitas is going to take on these new changes.

Offline Words_Twice

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2016, 22:01:23 »
ELB starts Oct 1 2016 PIA which will be CIA is 1 Apr 2017

Hi Teager, what is the source of your information, if you don't mind me asking?

Offline Teager

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2016, 22:06:33 »
Hi Teager, what is the source of your information, if you don't mind me asking?

Bill C-12 first reading was March 24. That link will take you to the Bill link.

http://army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,121395.msg1426107.html#msg1426107


Offline Teager

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2016, 16:57:45 »
Just an update to some of the changes coming to the benefits.

Quote


Disability Award Increased for Veterans"
Background
The Disability Award provides injured Canadian Armed Forces members or Veterans with tax-free financial support for an injury or illness resulting from military service. The Disability Award is paid in recognition of the non-economic effects, including pain and suffering, of service-related disabilities on the lives of Canadian Armed Forces members and Veterans.

Veterans Affairs Canada is committed, through Budget 2016, to a proposed increase to the maximum value of the Disability Award lump-sum amount.

Quick Facts
Budget 2016 reaffirmed the Government’s intent to support the long-term financial security of ill and injured Veterans.

It is proposed that the maximum Disability Award be increased from $310,378 to $360,000 on April 1, 2017. In addition, Death and Detention Benefit amounts would also be increased accordingly.

If passed, the increase the Disability Award and the Death Benefit would also mean that Canadian Armed Forces members, Veterans and survivors who have already received a Disability Award and/or a Death Benefit under the New Veterans Charter would benefit from the new rate and receive a supplementary payment.

For example, after the changes come into effect on April 1, 2017, a Veteran who has already received a Disability Award for a 25% disability assessment will receive a payment of $11,000 as a result of the increase.

The monetary value of a Veteran’s disability benefit is based on an assessment of his or her disability. The two factors that determine the assessment are the level of medical impairment resulting from an illness/injury and the resulting impact on the individual’s quality of life. While the degree of a Veteran’s disability is measured in one percent increments, disability benefits are paid in in 5% increments accordance with legislation.

The proposed maximum Disability Award lump-sum amount would be comparable to or greater than similar non-economic compensation amounts payable in Canada under private and public sectors insurance plans, by the Workers’ Compensation Board or as non-pecuniary damages awarded by Canadian courts.

If passed, changes to the Disability Award will come into effect April 1, 2017.

"Earnings Loss Benefit Increase for Veterans"
Background
The Earnings Loss Benefit provides income support to Veterans while they are participating in rehabilitation, and to those who are unable to be suitably, gainfully employed once their rehabilitation is complete.

Currently, it is a taxable, monthly benefit, which provides 75% of a Veteran’s monthly military salary at release, or of the salary of a basic corporal, whichever is greater. The benefit is adjusted for the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to a maximum of 2% per year.

Veterans Affairs Canada is committed through Budget 2016 to a proposed increase to the Earnings Loss Benefit that will provide injured Veterans with 90% of their pre-release salary, and index this benefit so that it keeps pace with inflation.

Quick Facts
Budget 2016 reaffirmed the Government’s intent to provide for the long-term financial security of ill and injured Veterans.

Increasing the Earnings Loss Benefit to replace 90% of an eligible Veteran’s pre-release military salary will make a difference in the pocketbooks of Veterans.

If passed, the Earning Loss Benefit will increase from 75% to 90% of a Veteran’s monthly military salary, or of the salary of a senior private, whichever is greater, and the 2% cap will be removed, so the enhanced benefit will keep pace with inflation.

In the interest of fairness, the increase is based on a Senior Private’s salary. To do otherwise would mean that some Veterans receiving the benefit could be making more than their comrades on active duty.

As an example, a Veteran who was a corporal in 1996 could receive up to $2,000 more each year because of this proposed enhancement.

If passed, changes to the Earnings Loss Benefit will come into effect October 1, 2016.

"Expanding Access to the Permanent Impairment Allowance"

Background
The Permanent Impairment Allowance is a monthly allowance paid to Canadian Armed Forces Veterans who have a permanent and severe impairment resulting from a service-related injury or illness that has affected their employment potential and career advancement. It is payable at three different grade levels (or rates).

Veterans Affairs Canada is committed, through Budget 2016, to a proposed expansion to the Permanent Impairment Allowance. Proposed changes build on improvements made in 2015 to broaden Permanent Impairment Allowance eligibility and also align with recommendations made by the Veterans Ombudsman and the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs.

Expanding access to the Permanent Impairment Allowance will better support Veterans who have had their career options limited by a service-related illness or injury.

Quick Facts
Budget 2016 reaffirmed the Government’s intent to provide for the long-term financial security of ill and injured Veterans.

A number of factors are considered when assessing the grade level of a Veteran eligible for the Permanent Impairment Allowance. The proposed changes will expand access to the three grade levels by introducing an individual assessment, which will measure the impact a service-related impairment has on a Veteran’s career advancement opportunities, and will consider years of service.

The changes mean that Veterans will be more appropriately compensated for the specific impact on their careers. No Veteran will receive less money as a result of this assessment.

For example, a Veteran who was assigned a grade three Permanent Impairment Allowance assessment due to a service-related injury prior to this proposed enhancement may be eligible for a higher grade level and higher Permanent Impairment Allowance payment based on the new individualized assessment, which would take into account the Veteran’s specific circumstances such as the impact on his or her ability to earn an income and the degree to which his or her military career was cut short.

If changes are approved, the program name would also be changed to “Career Impact Allowance” (from Permanent Impairment Allowance) to better reflect the intent of the program, which is to compensate for loss of employment potential and career advancement opportunities.

If approved, changes to the Permanent Impairment Allowance will come into effect on April 1, 2017.

"Re-opening VAC offices and hiring new staff to support Veterans"

Background
In 2013, Veterans Affairs Canada closed nine of its offices following an independent assessment that forecasted a five-year decline of 16% in the number of Veterans served by the Department.

The forecasted decline in Veteran clients did not occur as projected. The Department experienced only a 6% decline in the number of Veteran clients overall between 2010 and 2015. The number of high-need Veterans requiring assistance in the areas served by these nine offices grew from 713 in 2013 to 816 in October 2015.

The Prime Minister of Canada gave the Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence the mandate to re-open the nine previously closed Veterans Affairs service offices and to hire new service delivery staff to better support Veterans and their families where they live.

Quick Facts
Budget 2016 reaffirmed the Government’s intent to give back to Veterans and deliver on its promise to restore critical access to services.

Veterans Affairs Canada will re-open and staff offices in Charlottetown, Sydney, Corner Brook, Windsor, Thunder Bay, Saskatoon, Brandon, Prince George and Kelowna within the next 12 to 18 months.

Additionally, the Department will open a new office in Surrey, B.C., and expand outreach to Veterans in the Territories by working with local partners.

To help ensure Veterans have a more successful transition to civilian life, Veterans Affairs Canada will hire additional case managers so that each one serves no more than 25 individuals.

The Department has recently hired approximately 184 new front-line staff across the country. The number of new staff hired will continue to grow to 400 in total, as Veterans Affairs Canada fulfils its promise to provide Veterans and their families with the support they need, when they need it.

"Commemoration"

Background
It is the Government of Canada’s official duty to recognize with respect and dignity the achievements of Canada’s Veterans and the fallen.

Commemorating the service and sacrifices of Canada’s Veterans and those who made the ultimate sacrifice is a key pillar of Veterans Affairs Canada’s mandate.

Through the Canada Remembers Program, Veterans Affairs Canada works to ensure that Canadians remember and demonstrate their recognition of all who served in Canada’s efforts during war, military conflict and peace.

More than nine in ten (93%) Canadians agreed that Veterans should be recognized for their service to Canada, and 73% agreed that the Department’s remembrance program effectively honours Veterans and those who died in service. (Source: Veterans Affairs Canada, public opinion research, Attitudes Towards Remembrance and Veterans’ Week 2014 Survey).

The Veterans Affairs Canada 2016-2017 Report on Plans and Priorities highlights the following Canada Remembers Program areas: Funeral and Burial Program, Commemorative Partnership Program, Public Recognition and Awareness and Memorial and Cemetery Maintenance.

Quick Facts
Funeral and Burial Program

The Funeral and Burial Program provides financial assistance for funeral and burial services and grave marking for eligible Veterans. The Last Post Fund, a non-profit organization, delivers the program for Veterans Affairs Canada.

Funeral and burial assistance is provided to Veterans who die of a service-related injury or illness, or to those in financial need as determined through a means testing of their estate and, if applicable, that of their survivors.

In Budget 2016, plans were announced to expand program eligibility to more families of lower-income Veterans by increasing the estate exemption from approximately $12,000 to approximately $35,000, and to apply an annual cost of living adjustment moving forward.

Commemorative Partnership Program

This program expands the reach of remembrance programming by providing financial assistance for commemorative initiatives such as restoring local cenotaphs and hosting commemorative events. These initiatives are undertaken by organizations that wish to ensure that the achievements of our Veterans and the fallen are not forgotten. As a result, Canadians have more opportunities to participate in remembrance activities.

In Budget 2016, plans were announced to continue the Community War Memorial Program by merging it with the Commemorative Partnership Program.

By expanding the scope of the Commemorative Partnership Program to allow funding for the building of new community war memorials, the Department will streamline the application process, making it easier for Canadians and community groups to access funding for commemorative activities.

Public recognition and awareness

To encourage public recognition and awareness of the service and sacrifices of Canada’s Veterans and the fallen, Veterans Affairs Canada organizes commemorative ceremonies and events, both in Canada and overseas, in collaboration with regional, national and international partners. Examples include the upcoming 100th anniversary of the Battles of the Somme and Beaumont-Hamel and in 2017, the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

Veterans Affairs Canada is working with Canadian Heritage on the National Memorial to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan. It will recognize and honour the hard work, courage and personal sacrifices made by Canadians—both military and civilian—during the 12-year long mission. More information regarding the project will be available in the coming months.

Through Veterans’ Week (November 5-11), Veterans Affairs Canada engages Canadians, most notably educators and youth, in remembrance through a suite of resources and initiatives that highlight our country’s military history. Hundreds of commemorative and educational-based activities take place in communities and schools across Canada, leading up to and concluding with national and local commemorative events on Remembrance Day. More than 28,000 educators receive new learning materials each year to be taught in schools prior to November 11.

Canadians are encouraged to “Remember Them” through participation and attendance at events and through social media. Materials and promotions drive traffic to the Veterans Affairs Canada website which links visitors to the Department’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, Instagram), Calendar of Events and information on remembrance.

Veterans Affairs Canada also annually invites Canadian schools, individuals and organizations to make Valentines for Vets. The thousands of valentines are then distributed to Veterans in long-term care facilities across the country on February 14.

The Department also ensures that first-issue and replacement war-service medals are provided to Veterans, and that the Minister’s Commendation is presented to those who have demonstrated exemplary service to Veterans.

Memorial and cemetery maintenance

Canada’s 14 world war memorials in Europe, grave markers all over the world, and two departmental cemeteries in Canada are maintained through this program. Graves of more than 110,000 war dead in Europe and in Canada, as well as war memorials overseas, are cared for in collaboration with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and the United Nations Memorial Cemetery in Korea.

The Canadian Virtual War Memorial, one of the most highly visited pages on the Veterans Affairs Canada website, and the Books of Remembrance located in the Memorial Chamber on Parliament Hill are also maintained through this program.

http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/about-us/department-officials/minister/budget



Offline George Wallace

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2016, 12:05:47 »
This definitely brings the WTF NEWS home.  The problems facing veterans who came after WW II and Korea are constantly being brought forward and never getting resolved to the satisfaction of the modern veteran community.  They are being treated as "Second Class Veterans".  This further emphasizes the problems with creating VAC and the creation of another class of "Second Class Veterans within the Second Class Veterans".

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Quote
Ottawa imposes unequal increases in benefits for injured veterans
GLORIA GALLOWAY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May 31, 2016 9:48PM EDT
Last updated Wednesday, Jun. 01, 2016 7:33AM EDT

The federal government is increasing the amount it pays to veterans who are so incapacitated they can no longer work, but many of those who currently make the least will get raises of just a couple percentage points while those at higher ranks will get 20 per cent more.

The unequal adjustments are part of a deliberate attempt by the Liberal government to ensure that those who are discharged from the lower ranks after being injured in the line of duty make less money than soldiers who are still actively serving.

To do that, the government will essentially demote some veterans to a rank below the one they held when they left the military – something that the veterans say is not only unfair but humiliating.


“And they are only doing it for the bottom ranks,” said Don Leonardo, the founder of the advocacy group Veterans Canada who, because he retired 20 years ago as a master corporal, will be among those affected. “Why would you pick on the most vulnerable?”

The Earnings Loss Benefit pays those veterans who are “totally and permanently incapacitated” 75 per cent of what they were making on the day they were released from the Armed Forces until they reach the age of 65.

In 2011, the then-Conservative government said no one who is entitled to that benefit would receive less than $40,000 annually, which was then 75 per cent of the salary of a basic corporal. That provided a substantial boost, especially to those who were injured in places such as Bosnia, Somalia and Yugoslavia and who were discharged at salaries far below what their successors were making as a result of significant raises in the late 1990s and over the past decade.

But for years, veterans advocates and politicians have said 75 per cent is insufficient.

The Liberals promised during last year’s election campaign to invest an additional $40-million annually to provide the permanently injured veterans with 90 per cent of their prerelease salary. It was a commitment they kept in their first budget, with changes that are slated to take effect in October if the budget legislation passes without amendments. But there is a hitch.

The Liberals say the minimum payments will be based on the current salary of a senior private, even if the disabled soldier left the military at a higher rank.

The government says on its website that this is being done in the interest of fairness. “To do otherwise,” it explains, “would mean that some veterans receiving the benefits could be making more than their comrades on active duty.”

When asked to explain why it is so important to ensure that injured veterans do not make the equivalent of serving members of the Canadians Forces, the Veterans Affairs officials did not offer a direct response. “What is of paramount importance is that injured veterans have access to benefits that allow them to focus on their recovery,” they said in an e-mail.

Those former members of the Armed Forces who were discharged at salaries higher than the $49,449 that is currently paid to a senior private – the majors, the colonels, the generals and even the high-ranking non-commissioned officers – will not be affected by the rank reductions. Their Earnings Loss Benefits payments will climb by 20 per cent under the government’s plan, which, in some cases, will amount to tens of thousands of dollars.

But those at lower ranks, the mid-range non-commissioned officers who departed the military decades ago, and the reservists who were paid by the day, will get much less.

Mr. Leonardo, who was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder related to his service as a peacekeeper in the former Yugoslavia, and who makes $42,426 annually through the Earnings Loss Benefit, will get an increase of less than 5 per cent.

“If you can’t provide for your family, eventually you are going to give up,” said Mr. Leonardo. Politicians “keep talking about mental health. Well, if you can’t provide for your family, why would you even stick around. You feel like you’re not worth anything any more and they demote you a rank to private. It just gets worse and worse and worse.”

Veterans advocate Sean Bruyea said one of the harshest aspects of the government’s plan for veterans such as Mr. Leonardo is the loss of esteem.

“I know intellectually this is humiliating,” said Mr. Bruyea, a former captain and military intelligence officer who was also diagnosed with PTSD. “What’s Don’s value as a Canadian civilian now? His value is his memory of being honoured by Veterans Affairs. How do they honour him? They say, ‘We are going to demote you for no reason whatsoever other than to save money.’”

Cathay Wagantall, a Conservative MP who is her party’s deputy critic for Veterans Affairs, said she is trying to amend the budget bill to protect the lower-income disabled veterans. “I don’t have an answer for why they are choosing to do it this way,” Ms. Wagantall said of the government.

Irene Mathyssen, the NDP critic, said it is clear that the higher ranked officers will benefit the most. “And those poor guys at the bottom get very, very small increases,” Ms. Mathyssen said. “When you start to crunch the numbers, it’s Liberal voodoo.”



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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2016, 12:44:42 »
This comes as no surprise to me.  Anything that has been done benefits wise by successive governments is all about saving a buck or three on the backs of the injured.  Life pension changes being one of the best examples.  All their babble is just bullshit and meant to throw dust into the air to blind the sight of those who need to keep their eyes on the three card monty game that the GoC and VAC run.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2016, 12:48:09 by jollyjacktar »
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

Offline George Wallace

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2016, 18:56:50 »
DISCLAIMER: The opinions and arguments of George Wallace posted on this Site are solely those of George Wallace and not the opinion of Army.ca and are posted for information purposes only.
Unless so stated, they are reflective of my opinion -- and my opinion only, a right that I enjoy along with every other Canadian citizen.

Offline Teager

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #15 on: June 02, 2016, 19:11:19 »
I am very confused by all this. So taking myself as an example I released in 2014 and my ELB will be calculated at the Cpl 0 rank which is $56k so 90% of that is about $50k. So a Cpl from 10 or 20 years ago who probably made less than the $49k will be demoted to Snr Pte while a Cpl like myself won't get pushed down? I don't see how this even comes close to any logical sense. Creating another class of veterans again.

Offline Pieman

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2016, 19:21:22 »
Quote
The Liberals say the minimum payments will be based on the current salary of a senior private, even if the disabled soldier left the military at a higher rank.

I'm reading it that the new minimum will be 90% of a senior private, which I'm willing to bet is equivalent to the 75% of a Cpl pay....so this is like selling fuel for a 'lower price' by changing the ratings from gallons to liters. Lovely.

Graffiti in regimental toilet stalls: The official guide to troop moral....apparently.

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2016, 19:41:39 »
90% of Pte(3) is $3708.
75% of Cpl 5A (0) is $3535.50.

$172.50 raise, or less than 5% of Pte(3).

Offline Pieman

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2016, 20:03:34 »
Not exact amount, but I think that is close enough to say this is  a smoke and mirror show letting them get away with living up to their 90% commitment by not paying effectively anything extra.
Graffiti in regimental toilet stalls: The official guide to troop moral....apparently.

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2016, 20:14:51 »
Very much so. They'll tout the 15% increase to 90%, but with this slight of hand they only actually had to increase roughly 5%. A true 15% increase would have left the base salary as a Basic Corporal, a rank which everyone would attain if they were able to serve 5 years at most.

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2016, 20:17:36 »
Sounds like more Liberal lies, as usual.
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2016, 20:27:33 »
This is really the best they could do?  :facepalm:
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Offline Teager

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #22 on: June 02, 2016, 20:40:33 »
Quote
The Liberal government refuses amendments to the budget to protect benefits and improve services for wounded veterans

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 1, 2016

Ottawa (Ontario) - Yesterday, the Conservative members on the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs, Alupa Clarke, Cathay Wagantall and Robert Kitchen, submitted three amendments to Bill C-15, the Implementation Act, the Liberal government's budget, which is currently being studied by the Finance Committee. These changes would improve service delivery to injured veterans and protect the monthly payments of the allowance for loss of earnings against the planned reduction by the Liberal government.
Unfortunately, the Liberals Committee members voted unanimously against the proposed changes to protect the Allowance for loss of income, even if the reduction of the minimum threshold in the pay of a senior soldier instead of that of a basic Corporal result in lower benefits received by the most vulnerable injured veterans.
In addition, the Liberal chair of the Committee used procedural tactics to ensure that the vote on the two amendments does not take place. These amendments would have allowed the Department of Veterans Affairs to meet with wounded veterans at home and would have ensured that the Department of National Defence is working with the Department of Veterans Affairs to ensure that injured military assistance to navigate the complex administrative process to receive their benefits.
Addressing the Finance Committee yesterday, Cathay Wagantall member said: "The budget does not address the procedural problems which mean that the most vulnerable veterans, men and women who suffer from serious physical and mental illness , may not receive the support they deserve in a reasonable time. "
After the rejection of the amendments, the Wagantall MP added: "During the campaign, the Liberals promised to continue to improve services for wounded veterans and protect their benefits. Our amendments were based on the testimony of veterans and were a positive step in the right direction. Unfortunately, the Liberal government has chosen to vote against one of them and has used procedural tactics to block the other two.

https://fr-ca.facebook.com/AlupaClarke/posts/1430050133687603

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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #23 on: June 02, 2016, 21:28:08 »
VAC can already meet you at home. It's up to the Vet if they want to or not.
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Re: The disability award "top up".....not until 2017?
« Reply #24 on: June 02, 2016, 21:32:10 »
VAC can already meet you at home. It's up to the Vet if they want to or not.

Perhaps they mean those without a case manager?