Author Topic: US Navy Reserve  (Read 6340 times)

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Offline roxie roller

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US Navy Reserve
« on: February 07, 2013, 21:35:55 »
Just wondering if anyone has done any joint training with the US Navy Reserve?  Does anyone know if they do training on a regular basis similar to our NavRes units and in what capacity?

Thanks!

Offline yakherder

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Re: US Navy Reserve
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2013, 22:24:38 »
Not Navy Reserve, but I was U.S. Navy active duty for 6 years before hopping over to the Army.

We did all sorts of training exercises with many different countries covering many different situations, and we often had Navy Reserve members join us to get in on the war games.  How often they actually got a chance to do this I honestly don't know.  With any luck, someone will come along with a better answer than me :)
"Character is not made of sunshine and roses. Like steel, it is forged in fire, between the hammer and the anvil." -Zhu Jing Ning

Offline roxie roller

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Re: US Navy Reserve
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2013, 23:32:44 »
Thanks yakherder,

I've been trying to find out what US Naval Reserves do in terms of training on a regular basis at their home units. I believe the normal commitment consists primarily of one weekend a month and two weeks in the summer. But i'm not sure what they do during those trg periods or if there is additional unit training that takes place in addition to that minimum commitment.  Anyone?


Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: US Navy Reserve
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2013, 09:38:06 »
My experience with them is a little dated, but here goes:

The US Navy Reserve (unlike their "Army" and "Air Force" counterpart who are mostly made up of National Guards under the lead of their State) is directly under the Control of the Department of the Navy and is made up of already trained personnel that continue to serve after their regular service is over. So, unlike Canadian resevists, they are already trade trained when joining.

They are then assigned to a mobilization billet in a specific unit. For instance, they may make up the crew of a minesweeper or a watch on a Port Security Unit.

They have no "N.R.U.'s the way we do in Canada. They have regional training centers where they report for their one week-end a month and two week training period. At that center, there are regular serving officers in what is known as ATR occupation code - Administration and Training of Reserve Officers and NCMs. They organize everything and plan all the training so that when the reservists come in for the week end and 2 weeks, all they do is actual team training in the very task they have been assigned to. If required then, the whole "team" is mobilized as one and goes straight to the task they trained for.

In the 80's I participated in some joint command post ex. with US reservist making up some of the watches. I found them to be highly competent in their own specific task, but lacking in overall naval operations. I guess it's a drawback of their method: They concentrate so much on their mobilization duties in the short time they have that they don't really have time to absord all the ongoing developments in naval affairs going on around them in the rest of the Navy, unless they chose to do that on their own time somehow.

Hope this helps you.

Offline roxie roller

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Re: US Navy Reserve
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2013, 10:13:46 »
Thanks for your insight, Oldgateboatdriver.

From what I was reading online I did get the impression that many of the US Naval Reservists were former regular serving members although it seems there are some who have served only as reservists in the more traditional sense.

The reason I was asking is because I was interested in exploring whether or not there might be opportunities to set up some joint CAN/US Naval Reserve training, but I'm starting to get the idea that the differences between the way the two systems are set up just might not be conducive to such training.  I'm no expert in the logistics that might be involved so this is just about sending out feelers at this point.  I wonder if there is anyone out there with any experience with this type of joint training?

Thanks for your assistance, all.




Offline yakherder

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Re: US Navy Reserve
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2013, 14:00:51 »
In regards to the difference between reserve an
The US Navy Reserve (unlike their "Army" and "Air Force" counterpart who are mostly made up of National Guards under the lead of their State) is directly under the Control of the Department of the Navy and is made up of already trained personnel that continue to serve after their regular service is over. So, unlike Canadian resevists, they are already trade trained when joining.

This is for the most part correct, but let me expand on it just a little.

It isn't that the reserve is unique to the Navy and the National Guard is unique to the Army, branches of the military can have both.

The Air Force and Army have BOTH National Guard and Reserve components.  The Navy and Marines have only a Reserve component.

I'm currently in the Army National Guard and, yes, it operates in a manner similar to the reserve, the difference being that we are funded by and under the authority of the state (in my case Vermont).  But there is also the Army reserve, and they actually train in the same building as we do.  Like you said, the reservists are funded by and under the authority of the federal government.  We can, however, be basically loaned to the federal government.  That is why despite being National Guard, which is traditionally responsible for responding to things like local natural disasters, we can also be temporarily activated and sent to Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.  Like both the Reserves and active duty, we are typically sent as units or brigades.  The guys I train with one weekend per month are the same ones I deploy with.  Prior to a federal deployment we are sent to pre-mobilization for an unspecified period of time, usually a month or two, to make sure we are sufficiently trained.

Also, though a large portion of them are indeed prior service (when I got out of active duty Navy I immediately had recruiters sending me letters asking me to join the Reserves), they also have those without prior service.

Thanks for your insight, Oldgateboatdriver.

From what I was reading online I did get the impression that many of the US Naval Reservists were former regular serving members although it seems there are some who have served only as reservists in the more traditional sense.

The reason I was asking is because I was interested in exploring whether or not there might be opportunities to set up some joint CAN/US Naval Reserve training, but I'm starting to get the idea that the differences between the way the two systems are set up just might not be conducive to such training.  I'm no expert in the logistics that might be involved so this is just about sending out feelers at this point.  I wonder if there is anyone out there with any experience with this type of joint training?

Thanks for your assistance, all.

Though it might be very difficult to get some joint exercises scheduled during the monthly training, it might not be out of the question on the two week annual training.  For that, they are somewhat flexible, though they do plan ahead quite a ways in advance.  My unit already has a pretty good idea where we're going for our annual training both this coming summer and two years from now.  In the past, that training has been everything from camping for a couple weeks at a local base to deploying for an actual two week mission to Africa.  I assume the Navy Reserve operates in a similar manner, so it might actually be worth getting in touch with a Navy Reserve division and seeing if they'd have any interest in working something out.
"Character is not made of sunshine and roses. Like steel, it is forged in fire, between the hammer and the anvil." -Zhu Jing Ning

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: US Navy Reserve
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2013, 12:33:11 »
Thank you for the extra info Yackherder. Always good to hear from the "Green Mountain Boys".

Maybe there were just more ex-regular in the reserve in my days (cold war era). I must confess the only US Naval Reservist I ever encountered that had not served in the regular forces was a LT public relations officer, and I had always assumed it was as a result of his specific trade that he did not have to serve before joinning. He remained a good friend until he passed away from cancer about fifteen years ago.


Offline roxie roller

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Re: US Navy Reserve
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2013, 00:55:21 »
Thanks for the info all.

A two week mission to Africa?  Sounds like some summer training!  I do like the idea of deploying with the same unit you train with.  That just isn't feasable with Canadian NavRes Divisions, though theoretically they are set up that way.

So my next step will be to actually try to get in touch with someone from one of the NOSC's close by.  Even if we could do some joint training for a part of that two-week period I think it would be a great experience and good relations building.

I wonder if anyone has any experience setting up joint CAN/US training.  What might be some of the pitfalls that I might have to look out for?

Cheers