Author Topic: Infantry courses  (Read 20579 times)

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Offline teekay0

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Infantry courses
« on: January 12, 2013, 18:30:07 »
Greetings all,

As a Reservist in the Infantry,  I feel I have a lot to learn, and will always be learning throughout my career. Although this is an exciting aspect to this job, I would still like to be in a specialist position and be deemed an "expert" or "the go-to guy". That being said, I am not sure what specialist trades there are in the Infantry. Can anyone provide some insight for a new soldier eager to make a career out of the army?
The toughest swords are the ones that are beaten the hardest and heated the longest

Offline Goodeman

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Re: Specialist Trades in Infantry
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2013, 18:32:28 »
There is actually a whole thread with courses one could take for almost any trade. Do a search, and im sure you will find it.
BMQ July 6 2013

MikeL

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Re: Specialist Trades in Infantry
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2013, 18:41:39 »
In the Reserves you will be more limited for courses and employment compared to a Reg Force Infantryman. 

During your career you will do the Infantry career courses;  DP1 Infantry,  DP2 Weapons Det Member and eventually onto leadership courses.  During your time in the Reserves other courses may come up such as communications,  Urban Ops Instructor, driver wheel courses,  Basic Recce*, etc

*Basic Recce Patrolman isn't run very often in the Reserves from what I've been told.


Here is a partial list of courses that Infantry NCMs can go on.  Majority of the courses are not open to Reservists; such as sniper,  LAV(unless deploying on tour and you get it during work up training),  etc. 

Quote
Infantryman
   25mm Turret Operator
AN/MWG-055 Remote Weapon System Operator
Armoured Vehicle Administrative Movement
   Army Direct Fire Specialist
   Automatic Grenade Launcher System Gunner
   Drill – All Arms
Forward Air Controller – Supervisor
   Helicopter Observer
LAV III APC Crew Commander
LAV Crew Gunnery Trainer System Operator
Light Armoured Vehicle Remote Weapon System NANUK Operator
Mountain Operations – Advanced
One Meter Turret Operator
Patrol Pathfinder Insertion-Extraction Operator
   Patrol Pathfinder Leader
   Patrol Pathfinder Operator
Ranger (United States)
Reconnaissance Patrolman – Basic
RG31 Armour Patrol Vehicle Driver
Sniping – Advanced
Sniping – Basic
Urban Operations Instructor
Taken from http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,103901.msg1199568.html#msg1199568



FYI,  the proper way to abbreviate Private is Pte.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 08:29:44 by -Skeletor- »

Offline teekay0

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Re: Specialist Trades in Infantry
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2013, 19:25:21 »
I haven't been a reservist for long, what is an appropriate way to abbreviated Private? PTE?

Thank you for the list, I didn't know it would be so extensive. I will continue to learn and work hard  in the Reserves, while researching specialist options. I'm hoping to join Reg ASAP, but can stay patient until then.
The toughest swords are the ones that are beaten the hardest and heated the longest

Offline C.G.R

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Re: Specialist Trades in Infantry
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2013, 19:47:28 »
have you at least finished bmq?
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Offline fake penguin

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Re: Specialist Trades in Infantry
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2013, 19:55:09 »
I wouldn't concern myself with trying to a specialist position(whatever that is?) in the reserves if i was you. What you need to be focus on is getting qualified. Do bmq,bmq land, and then biq. After your qualified you can now be asset to your unit. You beable to go out and participate on weekend exercises and perform your job. Believe it or not, usually reserve units need people to take courses like driver wheel or basic comms. Alot of times when going out into the field on a friday to sunday a driver wheel qualified individual is a person that comes in handy alot. There is also opportunity too get cool courses like urban ops or your jump wings. I notice alot more reservist that got their jump wings now then did when i first join.
civilian

Offline Brihard

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Re: Specialist Trades in Infantry
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2013, 20:04:37 »
I haven't been a reservist for long, what is an appropriate way to abbreviated Private? PTE?

Thank you for the list, I didn't know it would be so extensive. I will continue to learn and work hard  in the Reserves, while researching specialist options. I'm hoping to join Reg ASAP, but can stay patient until then.

I've got about 9 years as reserve infantry, so I'll give you my take on it.

In the reserves we get budgeted 37.5 training days per year to work with, plus whatever you can land in terms of courses. You're not gonna likely get much chance to specialize. I give the greatest professional respect both up and down the chain to those who make a concerted effort to master the basics. Know your weapons and their capabilities in and out. Be able to navigate. Nail your cam and concealment. Be that guy who can actually move really quietly in the woods, or site that perfect trip flare, or what have you. Be fit. Be the guy that when I or a fellow NCO thinks "Who would I like to round out my recce patrol?" you come to the top of my mind.

If you stick with it, some day you will be brought to the point of being an NCO. Think of the term 'Master Corporal"- that right there shoudl tell you exactly what you aspire to in the early part of your career; master what it is we expect of being a private or corporal.

Once you're an NCO a lot of interesting doors open up- you start to see options like urban ops instructor (best course I've ever done) close quarter combat instructor, crowd control ops instructor, complex terrain instructor, unit demolition instructor, helicopter insertion isntructor, stuff like that. Those opportunities are there for guys who do really well. But nobody will lend you credibility as an NCO until you demosntrate that you're a kick *** soldier.

That list of courses below- most you'll never see as a reservist. In the reserves the courses I see guys getting outside of pure career path are the comms courses, rarely a basic recce patrol, occasionally basic  para or basic demolitions. Basic mountain ops is occasionally out there... A variety of driving quals. That's about it. Anything to do with armoured vehicles you'll likely only see if you go on tour with a high readiness task force. As a reservist don't ever expect to see stuff like sniper, ranger, stuff like that.

The stuff open to you as a Pte/Cpl isn't glorious. It's not meant to be. The role of a reservist in the Canadian forces is to be able to be called up on short notice, and to bring a solid baseline skill set to augment higher readiness forces. If you become the soldier that any section commander knows he can put in his section and turn his back on and trust whilst dealing with other issues, then you'll have done very well. And then you will also be in the chute to begin to be trusted with soldiers. Trust me, from experience, earning *that* trust feels better than any jammy course or speciality they might throw at someone.
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Offline cupper

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Re: Specialist Trades in Infantry
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2013, 20:36:21 »
If you stick with it, some day you will be brought to the point of being an NCO. Think of the term 'Master Corporal"- that right there shoudl tell you exactly what you aspire to in the early part of your career; master what it is we expect of being a private or corporal.

 :goodpost:
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Offline Jamie2319

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Infantry courses
« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2014, 15:40:37 »
Ok so this question may have been asked and if it has please refer me over to that thread. I've called a recruiter in Barrie and they didn't answer my question so I figured I'd bring it here.

Can infantry do more then 1 course and be trained in more then 1 specialized training course?

Ex. Can an infantry soldier be trained as a sniper and be trained as a patrol pathfinder?

Can an infantry soldier take sky diving courses as well as mountain ops courses?


Are combat engineers able to take the same courses as infantry? 


If these have already been answered please refer me to that thread, thank you.

Offline Capt. Happy

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Re: Infantry courses
« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2014, 16:03:45 »


Can infantry do more then 1 course and be trained in more then 1 specialized training course?

Ex. Can an infantry soldier be trained as a sniper and be trained as a patrol pathfinder?

Can an infantry soldier take sky diving courses as well as mountain ops courses?

Yes, yes and yes.

Quote
Are combat engineers able to take the same courses as infantry?

Some courses are designated all arms, meaning any trade can take them, i.e. driver courses, some are made available to Cbt Engr by their supported battalions based on space available, i.e. machine gunner, recce patrolman.

Offline Jamie2319

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Re: Infantry courses
« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2014, 16:46:24 »
Thank you for the answers and I'm deffinately going to read those links!

Offline ZKC

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What are the basic training programs infantry reserves go through?
« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2015, 21:00:20 »
I'm thinking of joining the reserves. I've heard that infantry reserves go through BMQ and all, but the content seem outdated and provide no specific information. Can anyone please tell me what the programs are and what do they consist of (specifically for reserves)?

Thanks

Offline mariomike

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« Last Edit: December 10, 2015, 21:44:52 by mariomike »

Offline Poacher434

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BMQ (law, dress, drill, C7 service rifle)
DP1 Mod 1 (Weapon systems)
DP1 Mod 2 (Field and tactics)

Then you are fully trained..

Collectively it is roughly 2 months of courses.

From there you start to get into speciality courses, leadership courses, common courses, etc