Author Topic: NCSTTP NWT looking to continue education and recieve degree after training.  (Read 7629 times)

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Offline Ixlr84u

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Good Day,  I am a student under NCSTTP and am about to begin my 4Th semester as an NWT under this program.  When I joined, I was originally supposed to complete my training at CFNES in Halifax.

             After completing BMQ, I was sent to Halifax and learned of the NCSTTP program in St. Johns, Newfoundland.  Under this program,  I receive a diploma from the Marine Institute and am promoted to an acting-lacking Leading Seamen upon completion of that stage of training.
 
             This diploma can be upgraded to a Bachelors of Technology with the completion of 12 more courses.  All of which can be done in a classroom, as well as through correspondence.  I currently hold an 80% average overall in my course, and would like to improve upon this.  With all of this said, I have a few questions.
 
             First, I would like to know how I would go about continuing my education after this program and receiving the degree I mentioned earlier.
 
             Secondly,  if I were to complete my degree, what are the career possibilities associated with this?  Being a student at a civilian institution, I must complete a period of obligatory service.  As far as I know, it is not possible to commission while on obligatory service.  Is this true?
 
             It is my desire to make a career of the military and I would like to express my utmost ambition to being as of much service as I can.  It is my desire to be commissioned, but I remain very humble in saying this and by no means suggest that I have any sense of entitlement to such an honor.  As such, I would also like to know the best path of action in pursuing such a goal. 

I appreciate all forms of feedback on this topic.

             Thank you.

Offline simsara

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There are several ways you can do this. You can do it the way I did which is release and go to the university of your choice and go back in when your done university as DEO or you can go ROTP while you are still in. Or I believe the navy has a continuing education program for individuals such as yourself wishing to be officers.

Offline MJP

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There are several ways you can do this. You can do it the way I did which is release and go to the university of your choice and go back in when your done university as DEO or you can go ROTP while you are still in. Or I believe the navy has a continuing education program for individuals such as yourself wishing to be officers.

So much wrong in that statement... 

Seriously if you don't know don't answer.  The only thing that you have info on is releasing then rejoining then talk about that.


For the OP

You can commission on obligatory service.

ROTP is not an option for Reg Force personnel.  The program you want to look for is UTPNCM.  There have been many discussions on the board around the program do a search and it will yield you info.

In the mean time, once you are settled at a unit (or have a long time in PAT) put in a ILP (Individual learning Plan) for your tech degree.  Once it is approve you can do schooling on your own time towards your degree.

If you get your degree as a NCM there is a programme called SCP (special commissioning plan/programme) for which you can apply for.
Hope is not a valid COA

Offline simsara

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Yeah, that answer is better than mine if you want to stay in. I would listen to MJP on that one. In my experience there were large advantages to releasing over continuing under UTPNCM. I don't think my answer is completely wrong though. I was a weapons tech (leading seaman). I considered all the options you are now, I chose the release option, now I have a degree in mechanical engineering, I travelled around the world a bit, worked offshore in the oil and gas industry, lived in Australia for awhile. I joined when I was 17, and truthfully I didn't know what I liked. If you are anything like me, your considering continuing your education and being an officer because you want more in life, you want to see what your capable of and how far you can go. To do that I needed more freedom to make my own decisions. I love the navy but I needed the freedom to find out why. Now I'm going back in as an NCS Eng and I am very happy about it. There is a big world out there and only so many years to see and feel it. MJP has excellent advice on how to proceed.....but I think mine isn't bad either.

Offline MJP

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MJP has excellent advice on how to proceed.....but I think mine isn't bad either.

Except for the fact that other than one thing you were wrong on everything else eh?  ;)

Releasing right now may not be an option as he owes obligatory service and if releases has to pay back some or all of the monies he received while in school.   Repayment of schooling includes salary paid while attending school, so it can shoot up into low hundred thousands in payback for some people.  Not a debt load most people are comfortable with just to attend school.
Hope is not a valid COA

Offline simsara

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It sounds like MJP has a good knowledge of the administration behind this. However, I actually did it. I sat down with the admin folks, the CSE chief, the div O, And considered everything. I left with no dept owed and I was actually given more money for University. I left free and clear. MJP I'm not really sure why your comments have a negative tone towards me but I have nothing but love for ya, I'm only trying to put out my personal experience in hoping to show a broader perspective. You can say I'm wrong all you want but I'm living proof of how to go from this persons place, continue education, and become an officer. It was actually all very easy and I had a great time doing it. I am more than willing to help this member out and explain how I did it. I wish you both the best.

Offline MJP

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It sounds like MJP has a good knowledge of the administration behind this. However, I actually did it. I sat down with the admin folks, the CSE chief, the div O, And considered everything. I left with no dept owed and I was actually given more money for University. I left free and clear. MJP I'm not really sure why your comments have a negative tone towards me but I have nothing but love for ya, I'm only trying to put out my personal experience in hoping to show a broader perspective. You can say I'm wrong all you want but I'm living proof of how to go from this persons place, continue education, and become an officer. It was actually all very easy and I had a great time doing it. I am more than willing to help this member out and explain how I did it. I wish you both the best.

I have no hate for you.  I do dislike wrong info and your original post was totally wrong.  Like I said stick to what you know.  If you had explained and stuck to the release, school and then re-enroll option, I wouldn't be busting your chops. 

Releasing without owing money can happen yes.  My wife did it and I know of others that have too.  All had exceptional circumstances and in almost every case they were in their first year of subsidized schooling.  I am curious how you got more money for Uni from them, can you fill us in?


Hope is not a valid COA

Offline simsara

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I had been in for about 4 years, I collected my pension contributions, a grant from veterans affairs and about $3k for the reimbursement of education expenses that I paid just prior to releasing and for 3 university courses I took before I released. However, the money from the military didn't go far at all, it was a drop in a very large bucket. ROTP would have covered more had I chose that route but I wanted to work in a bar( this was just something I always wanted to do). So I bartender at night and went to school during the day. There is one thing I want to mention that was integral to this whole process of leaving free and clear. I had a good friend in logistics that knew exactly how the system worked. Without him I would probably have owed money and never got out in the 3 months that it took me. He was the one who got me to take the courses prior to leaving, this way I got money back and it showed I was working to improve myself and transition to University. Exceptional circumstances are also very key. But again logistics people a very clever.

Offline Ixlr84u

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Very much appreciated.  I will do some research on UTP-NCM and SCP. 




         Thank you very much and good day.

Offline Pusser

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Another important thing to consider in the release and re-enroll scenario is the economic climate at the time.  Whereas it may have been easy to do that a few years ago, is it still that easy?  This forum is full of people who are knocking themselves out just trying to get into the CF the first time, as well as many others who are trying to re-enroll and finding it difficult.  Getting out with the intent of re-enrolling later is a huge gamble.  In my opinion, it's better to build on what you have than to throw it all to the wind in hopes of getting something better:

Consider the advantages of staying in and pursuing the educational opportunities available within the CF:

1)  continuing experience in a relevant field
2)  continued receipt of pay, allowances and other benefits (medical, dental etc)
3)  continued build up of pensionable service
4)  tuition, materials, etc paid for by the Crown
5)  job security and increased seniority

Versus:

1)  loss of pay, allowances and other benefits
2)  possible requirement to find outside employment in addition to studies
3)  loss of credit toward pension (better hope you invest return of contributions wisely)
4)  need to pay for tuition, materials, etc yourself
5)  no guarantee you will be re-enrolled

I used to work as a bartender in my old reserve unit.  I enjoyed it, but as a life experience, it was overrated.  I have never had any desire to work on an oil rig (spent enough time at sea to kill any thoughts of that) and I've seen the world with the Crown paying for it.  My recommendation to the OP is to build on what you've got.  You can indeed achieve what you're looking for, but do keep in mind that it will be a challenge.
Sure, apes read Nietzsche.  They just don't understand it.