Author Topic: JPSU IPSC Problems or Issues (merged)  (Read 61592 times)

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Offline captloadie

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Re: JPSU IPSC Problems or Issues (merged)
« Reply #75 on: December 12, 2016, 13:30:00 »
Given the timeline you stated, your unit likely will get a replacement posted in during the APS anyway. If they can still employ you fully, they probably aren't worried about staffing the paperwork until closer to the time you are scheduled to commence voc rehab. Or, they realize they aren't getting a replacement for you anyway, so why bother doing the paperwork. They can administer you on voc rehab if you are remaining in the same geo-location.

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Re: JPSU IPSC Problems or Issues (merged)
« Reply #76 on: February 01, 2017, 06:28:10 »
And with this ...
Quote
Chief of the Defence Staff announces Canadian Armed Forces General and Flag Officer senior appointments, promotions, and retirements ... Brigadier-General G.D. Corbould will retire from service, resulting in the following promotions and appointments:  Brigadier-General S.A. Brennan will be appointed Commanding Officer Joint Personnel Support Unit (JPSU), at NDHQ in Ottawa, replacing Brigadier-General G.D. Corbould ...
... we see this via The Canadian Press:
Quote
The commander of the military health unit responsible for mentally and physically injured soldiers is retiring, less than six months after taking over the much-maligned unit and promising to clean it up.

The timing of Brig.-Gen. Dave Corbould's sudden departure from the Joint Personnel Support Unit, which was announced Tuesday, has raised eyebrows and concerns about the unit's future.

But Corbould, who said he is hanging up his uniform for family reasons after 35 years in the military, insists the unit is finally on the right track after a tumultuous first decade of existence.

"It's much better because it's more focused, it understands itself better and it is moving forward," Corbould said in an interview. "And it is not reliant on any one individual. It is a team effort all around."

Corbould took over the support unit in August, hoping to turn the page on years of complaints and criticism about how Canadian soldiers, particularly those dealing with psychological injuries, were treated ...
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Offline NavyPhoenix

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Re: JPSU IPSC Problems or Issues (merged)
« Reply #77 on: February 05, 2017, 10:43:43 »
Let's get something perfectly clear here. JPSU staff are NOT medical personnel! They deal with the administration of personnel posted to them.  Fingers continue to be pointed to JPSU for failing our sailors/soldiers/airmen; but why are those fingers not being pointed to the actual medical community?? Staff at JPSU in some units are being told strongly by the medical personnel that they are not to even know what member's medical condition is. How, then, can they be held responsible?? Not being medical, how the hell are they supposed to be the ones to medically assist our members?  The real issue is staffing. There are units where the staff (a Sgt/PO2) will have up to 75 direct reports who are spread over a very large area. Where else in the military does a Sgt have 75 DIRECT reports?? Nowhere.

Start pointing the fingers and questioning those who are truly supposed to be working on the physical and mental health of our members and not the administrators who are working very, very hard; unable to actually do anything and taking all the blame when something goes wrong!

Rant over.

Offline Simian Turner

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Re: JPSU IPSC Problems or Issues (merged)
« Reply #78 on: February 06, 2017, 00:39:30 »
Staff at JPSU in some units are being told strongly by the medical personnel that they are not to even know what member's medical condition is. How, then, can they be held responsible?? Not being medical, how the hell are they supposed to be the ones to medically assist our members? 

Not sure what you mean by "medically assist"?  If the soldier posted the JPSU (or any unit) wants to share the nature of his medical condition that is up to him/her, the CAF medical system cannot and will not share so that should be the case in all and not just some JPSU units. 

I am not sure why you would need to know their medical condition to assist them - they receive medical employment limitations and a prognosis for recovery (TCAT 6 months or PCAT). If they need adaptive or ergonomic devices then that should be between CAF Health system and Veterans Affairs to figure out who is going to pay.

There are case managers and mental health (as appropriate) that should be doing collaborative work with the JPSU staff on a weekly basis.  So let's be clear, it is not about being responsible, it is about being responsive to the individuals needs and entitlements.

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Offline NavyPhoenix

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Re: JPSU IPSC Problems or Issues (merged)
« Reply #79 on: February 06, 2017, 13:18:32 »
I agree. My point is that it is the medical system that is the ones who are supposed to work on the member's medical condition. JPSU staff are very, very good at being responsive to member's needs. But when a member "goes off the rails" (and it is almost always due to a mental health issue), it is JPSU staff who are blamed for not dealing with the member's issues when it is not their job to do that. I am just tired of JPSU wearing all the blame and the medical system and mental health personnel are not being questioned as to what did they do to assist the member.

Offline CountDC

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Re: JPSU IPSC Problems or Issues (merged)
« Reply #80 on: February 07, 2017, 13:46:55 »
I have to agree with Navy Phoenix on this one, too often the finger is pointed at JPSU.  People sometimes have highly unreasonable expectations of the JPSU due to lack of knowledge in their function. From my experience they worked extremely hard to do everything possible to assist the mbrs attached or posted to them.
"When the power of love, overcomes the love of power....the world will know peace" - Jimi Hendrix [1942-1970]

Offline BrownCoatOtaku

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Re: JPSU IPSC Problems or Issues (merged)
« Reply #81 on: March 14, 2017, 14:22:01 »
I have been posted to JPSU unit for about 16 months now, and all most all issues do not come from staff, it comes from the civilians hired and working there.
My staff had a hay day with me, they have never had someone who was posted in and was Fit for Duty. Before me all people they had posted there had already been on TCat or PCat
My Sgt and WO have been amazing upon my posting in, time leading up to surgery and last 6 months recovery.



couple examples

They have even attempted twice to get me my promotion to CPL, Upon my arrival as I was fit, had the forces test, time in (currently at 4 1/2 years) and my 2.0 (Cpl Quals) and CFB Edmonton Policy was to promote to Cpl at 3 years due to higher cost of living. (upon my arrival in Edmonton I had 3 years 3 months of service)

My old CoC provided supporting paperwork saying if I had remained I would have been advanced promoted (my posting for surgery was the reason they didn't submit the paperwork), JPSU provided supporting paperwork and the local trade unit provided supporting paperwork saying if I had been posted to them I would have had my Cpls by end of my first month there


The first time it was rejected on it was not Ottawa Policy to promote Cpl on 3 years due to higher cost of living and being posted to JPSU made me Operational Undeployable.  .

My only issue with JPSU was some person in Ottawa had the final say on my promotion to Cpl and rejected it based on Ottawa policies not CFB Edmonton policy (at the time)

Turns out no matter what base you are on, if you are posted to JPSU, you belong to Ottawa and most decisions are made based on Ottawa policies not local Base or unit policies.

About 2 weeks ago they put forward my promotion again based on the new CANFORGEN that came out in Feb stating  DE-LINKING OF MEDICAL CONDITION FROM PROMOTION CRITERIA.  And even tho I would only be promoted to Acting Cpl till I completed the forces test after the completion of my physio and reactivation PT.

As great as my promotion would be, I must admit some of my egerness for my promotion is motivated by the pay raise that comes with it.  I do admit my bills have drastically increased do to being posted from Petawawa to Edmonton and I lost field pay because of not belonging to a field unit (I even had to return my rucksac).

Almost every time I have had a bad experience it is from my civilian case nurse, who didn't like something or wanted something changed because of her personal opinion.

I was RTD to a local unit until my surgery. They wanted to send me to field to prevent skill fade and even give me training I didn't have before, both CoC were in agreement with this. The Case Nurse didn't like the idea of sending me to the field so she had me given Not Fit For Field MEL, even tho I was fit for duty. And when it came time to do the forces test (10 days before my surgery) she had No Forces Test put on my MEL, even when I had approval from doctor to attempt it.

I have talked with a few other people posted to JPSU who are awaiting medical release (where I will returning to active duty upon receiving Fit For Duty), and their issues are not with JPSU themselves but the Civilian and VA.

Now I do admit that my experience is not the same as everyone else. I am simply saying my experience has been the civilians that have caused 95% of issues I have.

PS

For the record this is not a poor poor me message.. it's a here are some of the reasons for my opinion message
« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 14:26:24 by BrownCoatOtaku »

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Re: JPSU IPSC Problems or Issues (merged)
« Reply #82 on: April 13, 2017, 05:18:51 »
Posting this here mostly because of the JPSU focus ...

From CBC.ca ...
Quote
Military to disband and replace oft-maligned support units for wounded soldiers

Units were created in crisis, Gen. Jonathan Vance says, and time has come to do better

After an attempted overhaul last year, an often-maligned support unit for ill and injured soldiers will be disbanded, the country's top military commander says.

Gen. Jonathan Vance, the chief of defence staff, testified before a Senate committee on Wednesday that the function of the Joint Personnel Support Units (JPSUs) will be folded into a "proper, professionalized" organization that will better help members transition to civilian life.

"The JPSU was created in crisis," Vance told reporters following the meeting. "I think enough time has passed, we've gained enough expertise about how to manage this better."

The units were set up in 2008 during the Afghan war as centres where wounded troops could be posted until they recovered or left the military. The 24 personnel-support centres are located at bases and wings across the country, and offer programs and administrative support to troops unable to fulfil their regular duties.

Internal defence department studies have shown few of the soldiers posted to JPSUs returned to their units.

Soldiers have long complained the JPSUs and their subordinate Integrated Personnel Support Centres are habitually understaffed and that the units have often proved unhelpful in preparing them for a post-military career.

Last year, an internal assessment team, ordered by Vance and led by Brig.-Gen. David Anderson, identified myriad problems, many related to staffing and resources ...
... and the Globe & Mail:
Quote
The Chief of the Defence Staff is planning to create a branch of human-resource professionals within the military that would be dedicated to helping retiring soldiers, sailors and aviators step more easily into civilian life.

One of the most difficult problems facing the Canadian Forces in recent years has been the uneven, and often jarring, process for discharging personnel.

That is especially true for members of the military who are forced out of their jobs as a result of a service-related injury and sometimes have to wait unreasonable amounts of time for the benefits that will cover their basic expenses. But even uninjured veterans, reservists in particular, have waited months for their first pension cheques. And the psychological impact of taking off a uniform for the last time can be severe.

General Jonathan Vance told a Senate committee on Wednesday he has plans to make the transition out of the military more seamless.

His plans include the re-establishment of a defunct branch of the Armed Forces called the personnel administration branch and the eventual disbandment of the Joint Personnel Support Unit (JPSU), which was created during the war in Afghanistan to deal with the needs of ill and injured soldiers and now performs many of the discharge functions.

“We will change our approach from that which is provided by the current JPSU and staff an organization that will exist across the country and provide expertise and direct support to those members who are retiring, regardless of what the reason is for why they are retiring,” Gen. Vance told the senators.

The intent is to put the job of transition into the hands of trained human-resource experts and to ensure that no member leaves the forces without all of their paperwork completed, the general said. In fact, he later told reporters, he would like no member of the military to leave the forces until their first pension cheque is ready to be mailed ...
“The risk of insult is the price of clarity.” -- Roy H. Williams

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Offline stellarpanther

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Re: JPSU IPSC Problems or Issues (merged)
« Reply #83 on: May 07, 2017, 20:45:19 »
I have been posted to JPSU unit for about 16 months now, and all most all issues do not come from staff, it comes from the civilians hired and working there.
My staff had a hay day with me, they have never had someone who was posted in and was Fit for Duty. Before me all people they had posted there had already been on TCat or PCat
My Sgt and WO have been amazing upon my posting in, time leading up to surgery and last 6 months recovery.



couple examples

They have even attempted twice to get me my promotion to CPL, Upon my arrival as I was fit, had the forces test, time in (currently at 4 1/2 years) and my 2.0 (Cpl Quals) and CFB Edmonton Policy was to promote to Cpl at 3 years due to higher cost of living. (upon my arrival in Edmonton I had 3 years 3 months of service)

My old CoC provided supporting paperwork saying if I had remained I would have been advanced promoted (my posting for surgery was the reason they didn't submit the paperwork), JPSU provided supporting paperwork and the local trade unit provided supporting paperwork saying if I had been posted to them I would have had my Cpls by end of my first month there


The first time it was rejected on it was not Ottawa Policy to promote Cpl on 3 years due to higher cost of living and being posted to JPSU made me Operational Undeployable.  .

My only issue with JPSU was some person in Ottawa had the final say on my promotion to Cpl and rejected it based on Ottawa policies not CFB Edmonton policy (at the time)

Turns out no matter what base you are on, if you are posted to JPSU, you belong to Ottawa and most decisions are made based on Ottawa policies not local Base or unit policies.

About 2 weeks ago they put forward my promotion again based on the new CANFORGEN that came out in Feb stating  DE-LINKING OF MEDICAL CONDITION FROM PROMOTION CRITERIA.  And even tho I would only be promoted to Acting Cpl till I completed the forces test after the completion of my physio and reactivation PT.

As great as my promotion would be, I must admit some of my egerness for my promotion is motivated by the pay raise that comes with it.  I do admit my bills have drastically increased do to being posted from Petawawa to Edmonton and I lost field pay because of not belonging to a field unit (I even had to return my rucksac).

Almost every time I have had a bad experience it is from my civilian case nurse, who didn't like something or wanted something changed because of her personal opinion.

I was RTD to a local unit until my surgery. They wanted to send me to field to prevent skill fade and even give me training I didn't have before, both CoC were in agreement with this. The Case Nurse didn't like the idea of sending me to the field so she had me given Not Fit For Field MEL, even tho I was fit for duty. And when it came time to do the forces test (10 days before my surgery) she had No Forces Test put on my MEL, even when I had approval from doctor to attempt it.

I have talked with a few other people posted to JPSU who are awaiting medical release (where I will returning to active duty upon receiving Fit For Duty), and their issues are not with JPSU themselves but the Civilian and VA.

Now I do admit that my experience is not the same as everyone else. I am simply saying my experience has been the civilians that have caused 95% of issues I have.

PS

For the record this is not a poor poor me message.. it's a here are some of the reasons for my opinion message

I think if I had a doctor telling me I could do it and it was in writing, I would ignore what the nurse had to say and did the test anyways.  When I need to go to sick parade for anything, I always tell them I want to see a doctor and not a PA or nurse.  The medics don't always like it but it is my right.  I've had a coupe bad experiences with a PA and nurse so I don't want to see them.

Also, VAC told me they only go by what a MD says and not a PA or nurse practitioner.