Author Topic: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread  (Read 110708 times)

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Offline bruce7711

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #50 on: October 19, 2007, 21:12:04 »
Anf you are guarenteed to get your CD in a presentation full of invited media within 48 hrs as well. if I recall. ;D
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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #51 on: October 19, 2007, 21:57:30 »
I think its harder to determine how long a mind will heal vs say how long it will take someone to walk.  I believe there is something in the CF that says something to the effect that they can't release you until they either fix you or determine you can't be fixed.  I a person with mental issues can't ever deploy after treatment etc then they too should be released.  If they have some need experience higher them on a private contract.
Our BN is standing up a cell of injured members to help with the up coming tour with regards as to how DVA works, death and injury benefits etc.  So that if needed a spouse or injured member has someone in BN in the know that has been through it.
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Offline --NES--

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #52 on: October 19, 2007, 23:37:56 »
I think its harder to determine how long a mind will heal vs say how long it will take someone to walk. 

I personally don't believe it's an issue of 'when' the mind will heal, more of an issue as to when the member has reach a point where they can resume duties effectively.  Most cases of PTSD aren't immediate, and most don't just 'heal up' and go away over time like a physical wound (granted; loss of limb doesn't go away either). It's a matter of weather or not the soldier can carry on and work effectively with these 'injuries'.

I have some pretty bad days still, but I'm able to do my assigned duties effectively.

I believe there is something in the CF that says something to the effect that they can't release you until they either fix you or determine you can't be fixed.

The only documentation I've found regarding this is in reference, specifically, to the reserve members; CANFORGEN 116/04 EXTENSION OF CLASS C RESERVE SERVICE FOR INJURY OR ILLNESS WHILE IN SDA/SDO

Quote from: CANFORGEN 116/04
3. ... ALL RES FORCE MBRS INJURED OR ILL WHILE SERVING ON CLASS C SERVICE IN AN SDA/SDO, WILL NOW BE ELIGIBLE FOR EXTENSION OF CLASS C SERVICE UP TO A MAXIMUM OF 24 MONTHS OR UNTIL SUCH TIME AS THE MBR MEETS ONE OF THE FOLLOWING:
A.   IS DECLARED MEDICALLY FIT BY MO
B.   RESUMES ACTIVE PARTICIPATION IN THE RES FORCE
C.   RETURNS TO THE CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT HELD PRIOR TO GOING TO AN SDA/SDO
D.   IS ABLE TO SEEK CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT
E.   IS ABLE TO RESUME ATTENDANCE AT AN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION IF HE/SHE WAS A FULL TIME STUDENT PRIOR TO DEPLOYMENT
F.   IF MBR RESUMES SCHOOL BUT CANNOT PARADE, DCSA WILL REIMBURSE MISSED CLASS A TRAINING

4.   NO EXTENSION WILL BE GRANTED IF MBR REFUSES THE MEDICAL TREATMENT PRESCRIBED,OR THE MBR IS MEDICALLY RELEASED FROM THE CF

I would honestly hope that these same benefits are granted to the Reg F... It seems to me that they already are, pretty much.

If a person with mental issues can't ever deploy after treatment etc then they too should be released. 

Well... essentially, if they can't DAG green for deployment due to mental health issues, they probably shouldn't be employed in the CF anyway... depending on the severity of the mental illness, of course.

Our BN is standing up a cell of injured members to help with the up coming tour with regards as to how DVA works, death and injury benefits etc.  So that if needed a spouse or injured member has someone in BN in the know that has been through it.

I think this is a great idea.  And I think more units, both Reg and Res should be getting on this boat.  Each deploying unit should have a deployment cell in place to deal with this kind of stuff for when it happens.  Most Reg F units do this, but it's a big issue in the Res world. Due care should be employed when Res units augment the big R in deployments, 'cause from personal experience, the Reserves struggle to keep on top of their deploying members needs... and it gets a lot worse when casualties return.
Not saying things haven't gotten better, it's just a long time coming and there is always room for improvement.  But it is understandable to an extent; most reserve unit aren't used to dealing with casualties from deployment.

« Last Edit: October 19, 2007, 23:40:58 by RHFC_piper »
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Offline TCBF

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #53 on: October 20, 2007, 10:55:48 »
I personally don't believe it's an issue of 'when' the mind will heal, more of an issue as to when the member has reach a point where they can resume duties effectively.  Most cases of PTSD aren't immediate, and most don't just 'heal up' and go away over time like a physical wound (granted; loss of limb doesn't go away either). It's a matter of weather or not the soldier can carry on and work effectively with these 'injuries'.

- Brings to mind a story in a late 1980s  (European edition of 'Stars and Stripes', I believe).  Apparently, a soldier had a breakdown related to his Vietnam service some 15 - 20 years previous.  This started a lot of organizational soul searching related to high ranking positions in 'nuclear capable' units and so on.

- On the flip side, this opens the door to grotesque abuse: recall the smearing of John McCain by his political oponents who stated that his years as a captive by North Vietnam had rendered him unfit to be President.
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Offline GAP

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #54 on: October 20, 2007, 12:47:49 »
I think this is a great idea.  And I think more units, both Reg and Res should be getting on this boat.  Each deploying unit should have a deployment cell in place to deal with this kind of stuff for when it happens.  Most Reg F units do this, but it's a big issue in the Res world. Due care should be employed when Res units augment the big R in deployments, 'cause from personal experience, the Reserves struggle to keep on top of their deploying members needs... and it gets a lot worse when casualties return.
Not saying things haven't gotten better, it's just a long time coming and there is always room for improvement.  But it is understandable to an extent; most reserve unit aren't used to dealing with casualties from deployment.

Most reserve units are within shouting distance of some form of Reg Force unit....why not use the same cell?
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Offline the 48th regulator

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #55 on: October 20, 2007, 12:50:20 »
Most reserve units are within shouting distance of some form of Reg Force unit....why not use the same cell?

It's not the decibel level of the the shouting, it is  the level of listening that impedes this help.

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Offline --NES--

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #56 on: October 20, 2007, 13:23:17 »
Most reserve units are within shouting distance of some form of Reg Force unit....why not use the same cell?

It's not the decibel level of the the shouting, it is  the level of listening that impedes this help.

dileas

tess



What 48th said is exactly right.

But you also have to keep in mind that members from LFCA deployed with units from RCR, and the furthest reserve units are from as far away as Windsor, London, K-w etc. (6+ hours).  Support stretching that far out usually comes too little too late.
It's probably no different in any other area.

In my mind, the deployment support cell in each unit would cover every aspect of, and only, deployment of their members;
- Selection and pre-pre-training of deploying members
- DAGing issues which need to be covered at CBG/unit level before the member can progress to their deploying unit
- Financial care taking at unit level while the member is working with their deploying unit, but has not yet taken on a class C contract (this is going on right now. our deploying members for 3-08 are on class B paid through our unit by LFCA/31 CBG until Feb when they start their class C deployment contract... all part of the 2 year commitment reservists now make to deploy.)
- Family information network when member deploys (the Deployment support center is nice and all, when you can get through to them via phone... my parents gave up)
- AOs for wounded and KIA.  The Res unit supplies these for their members who are wounded/KIA no matter what Reg F unit they deploy with.
- Post deployment DAG when troops return.  There are members of my unit who deployed in 3-06 who have not completed their post deployment screening/medical, TB testing, etc.  Simply because when they got back, they went back to their civilian jobs and no one from the unit (day staff) had the time/information, to get them going on this. When I started working half days again at the unit, it was my job to do this... by then, the troops had been home 4 months.
- Post deployment assistance issues; employment, education, etc.

These are the kinds of things a Res unit deployment cell could take care of.  Years ago, this may have seemed unreasonable, since most units sent only a few members on deployment, but now reservists are deploying in much greater numbers.  From my unit alone we sent 10 on TF3-06, there are already 10 in training for 3-08 and we're expecting to send a few more... possibly another 10.  Demand is getting greater and greater... and when the troops from 3-08 return, the unit will still be dealing with members from 3-06 (I can guarantee at least 1).   

Perhaps having a cell at each unit is a bit excessive/not cost effective, but it would be good to have one at Brigade level at least.   These cells would have to be tasked only with deployment and nothing else, or they would get bogged down... most Res units have members appointed to take care of some of this stuff, along with their normal tasks, which creates issues... especially when they're class A.

just my $0.02
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Offline c_canuk

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #57 on: October 22, 2007, 10:30:29 »
you bring up some good points but I don't think there is a really any good solution... Res members like it has already been said, commit 2 years or almost to deploy... unless we spend a wack load of money to provide these services at the Res units... even if just to the areas with multiple units in a single building... you are going to end up keeping the reservists from home even longer.

the two tours I've been on I was away from home 7-8 months max... to go to afghanistan I will be away 15-18 months... I suppose if there were an accelerated IBTS trg for reservists, say a quarterly run 2 month program that worked 16 hour days including saturday we might be able to accomidate the Res a little better... other than that I don't see much of an alternative.
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Offline --NES--

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #58 on: October 22, 2007, 11:17:10 »
you bring up some good points but I don't think there is a really any good solution... Res members like it has already been said, commit 2 years or almost to deploy... unless we spend a wack load of money to provide these services at the Res units... even if just to the areas with multiple units in a single building... you are going to end up keeping the reservists from home even longer.

the two tours I've been on I was away from home 7-8 months max... to go to afghanistan I will be away 15-18 months... I suppose if there were an accelerated IBTS trg for reservists, say a quarterly run 2 month program that worked 16 hour days including saturday we might be able to accomidate the Res a little better... other than that I don't see much of an alternative.

Well... Honestly, just about everything I've mentioned above is already done by a few day staffers at reserve units anyway... while they try to do their normal duties.  This is when people and their issues slip through the cracks.  Simplest solution: 1 extra class B member working per unit just for deployment... if that's too much of a drain, how about 1 class B member per CBG to co-ordinate everything deploying troops need (as listed above.)

I don't think it's unreasonable.  And the CF reserve system has certainly wasted money on more useless things (like bumper stickers, banners and fliers for a 2 week exercise with limited attendance required.)  Anyway, the point is, I don't think it would cost a "whack load" of money, and where better would this money be spent then on deploying troops? 

These members, who would be looking after deploying pers, would be co-ordinating with already existing services...


As for IBTS and extra training;  Before I deployed, during "selection training", we did it all in Meaford over a few weekends.  I won't go into details, but it was a mess.
The troops we sent up to Pet in March for TF3-08 were put on class B in Jan/feb and spent a couple of months sitting around in the Armoury doing odd jobs, if anything at all, waiting to go.  This is time they could have used to go over IBTS, or at least working with the guys who just came back, but, alas, they did not.  They sat on *** and waited for orders to move.  Why? no one was around to sort them out (well... I was around, but I wasn't allowed to sort them out... 'cause I am but a lowly Cpl with no PLQ)
Anyway, this is the kind of thing a deployment cell, even one consisting of one PLQ qualified member, could cover... once the troops know they're deploying, they could immediately begin unit level work up during regular training nights and some weekends and still stay within budget.
And perhaps they could even learn something from members who have returned from previous tours, wounded or otherwise.

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Offline 284_226

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #59 on: December 26, 2007, 08:21:23 »
Shared in accordance with the "fair dealing" provisions, Section 29, of the Copyright Act.

Wounded will have easier time getting transfers
By MURRAY BREWSTER The Canadian Press
Wed. Dec 26
Article link

OTTAWA — Soldiers who’ve lost limbs or suffered other grievous wounds in Afghanistan will soon find it easier to transfer to training — or other specialties within the Canadian Forces, says the country’s top military commander.

In the first eight months of this year more than 100 Canadian soldiers were injured badly enough on the battlefields of Kandahar to be evacuated home to what many consider to be an uncertain fate.

The Defence Department will not release a precise accounting of the total number of wounded.

One of the first questions Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier says he hears from wounded, most of whom he’s met, is: "Sir, do I have a future in the Canadian Forces?"

The latest episode took place a couple of weeks back and involved a young platoon commander from CFB Valcartier, Que., whose left leg was shredded below the knee as he struggled in vain to reach a comrade in a bombed-out vehicle last fall.

"You’re damn right" you have a future, was Hillier’s answer to the young lieutenant, a Royal Military College graduate, whom he declined to identify.

The same kind of encounters are happening more and more frequently, forcing both the army and the Defence Department to grapple with human resource and health issues it hasn’t faced since the Korean War.

Asked in a year-end interview whether a new policy, meant to keep injured soldiers in uniform, will make it easier for them to transfer to less strenuous occupations, Hillier answered: "Absolutely."

Soldiers will be required to make the decisions individually, based upon what’s best for their career, but red-tape impediments are expected to be removed.

"We have 115 other specialists," Hillier said. "If the wear and tear of being an infantry officer with a (prosthetic limb) is too much, that’ll be his decision to make, then we have all of these other specialities that we’d want you to have a look at."

The quality of treatment given to those wounded in the Afghan war received increasing public attention during the last year as troops, many of whom have no other skills than soldiering, have been forced to confront what can sometimes be an indifferent bureaucracy.

The policy was drafted last summer in the waning days of Gordon O’Connor’s tenure as defence minister, but has yet to be implemented, despite the growing number of Hillier’s emotional interviews with young soldiers.

Hillier defended the delay by saying many of the injured are still recovering and face a long road of rehabilitation before they’re eligible to return to duty.

"We don’t need to rush. We need to get it right."

Under the current system, a soldier who becomes disabled has three years to recover and meet the fitness standard for overseas operations — known as the universality of service rule. If they cannot meet the requirement, they have no choice but to face a medical discharge.

The system was introduced by Hillier as a way to improve fitness in what had become in the late 1990s an increasingly flabby Forces. He has resisted efforts to tinker with the base requirements of the universality rule, despite internal pressure to bend the rules for wounded.

There have been remarkable advancements in prosthetic limbs, which allow amputees the opportunity to remain physically fit, said Hillier.

The message he’s been giving troops is: as long as they pass the fitness test, the injured soldier will be able to retrain for other occupations.

A problem just as vexing, which has yet to be addressed by either the Defence Department or Veterans Affairs Canada, involves the wait time for benefits faced by medically discharged soldiers.

Since members of the Forces are not allowed to apply for health benefits, such as counselling, until after they are released, there is normally a "gap of several months," warned a briefing note to O’Connor, which was released earlier this year.

An official with Veterans Affairs acknowledged in July there is a problem, but no formal steps have been taken to close the gap.

Offline OberstSteiner

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #60 on: December 26, 2007, 09:00:54 »
Sounds like a brilliant idea that should have been implemented already. I don't know how many semi-usless bodies in uniform I have met while merely in the reserves that could be given a C7 and put to work. A soldier wounded on tour deserves and commands some dignity and respect and it isn't too hard to rectify the problem by giving them desk-duty or some kind of training to pass on knowledge, which is what the forces desperately need at the moment. I have to admit that the way the forces treats its wounded (mentally or physically) is one negative that concerned me when applying.

Online tomahawk6

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #61 on: December 26, 2007, 09:35:51 »
Sounds good. Its a win win for the soldier as well as for the Forces.

Offline simysmom99

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #62 on: December 26, 2007, 11:48:12 »
It's coming.  This is a great big government with so many hands in the pot.  If it was just up to the Military, it would  have been implemented many months ago.  All the hard work and lobbying is paying off.

Offline PPCLI Guy

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #63 on: December 26, 2007, 12:06:22 »
And to be clear, not a single soldier that has been injured in AStan has been forced to discharge - indeed I know of one soldier who was convinced to sign a re-engagement so that he could continue to receive the benefits offered to a serving member.  The regulations are slowly catching up to the reality, as well as the sentiment.
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Offline Runner

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #64 on: December 26, 2007, 18:46:16 »
I know something is coming out very soon, I do know that the policy will encompass not only those who have become injured on tours and duty but those who have gained their disability through illness and accidents. I have been working with the Soldier On program since the start and one of the goals is to make sure the whole Defence Team is taken care of!
 

Offline 284_226

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #65 on: December 26, 2007, 20:22:34 »
I know something is coming out very soon, I do know that the policy will encompass not only those who have become injured on tours and duty but those who have gained their disability through illness and accidents.

That very topic has been the elephant in the room for some time now.  In other threads, some people have been quite vocal against the concept of disabled members remaining in uniform.  Has there been a change of heart, now that even the CDS has acknowledged the situation needs to be addressed?

Offline dapaterson

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #66 on: December 26, 2007, 21:00:35 »
Helping wounded soldiers is a key part of the promise made to anyone who joins.  But we need to have fit, capable soldiers.  There is a whole "Defence Team" - we could have  soldiers unable to meet Universality of Service transferred into civilian roles in DND, whether in the training system or elsewhere. 

But if we show we can and will accommodate anyone, we open the door to anyone and everyone to join.  How can we refuse people enrollment who are not fit field if we protect and promote others who are not fit field?  And when a key limiting factor for our force structure is the number of Reg Force PYs, filling them with those who are unable (but not unwilling) to deploy or be employed in the harder parts of the trade means greater stress and strain on the others still in.  It's unfair to the rest, and it's consumption of a scarce resource (Reg F PYs) that delivers little combat capability.

So re-jig some structures to provide public service employment with portability of benefits.  Ensure a robust transition program is in place.  Provide a clear policy on medical / rehab leave.  Get VAC to provide services starting a month before release to ensure continuity of care (and for every case where they fail, start docking performance pay from everyone in VAC in receipt of it).  But don't tie up Reg F PYs with pers who will be unable to recover sufficiently to meet U of S.

Just my (unpopular) 2c.
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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #67 on: December 26, 2007, 21:03:31 »
That very topic has been the elephant in the room for some time now.  In other threads, some people have been quite vocal against the concept of disabled members remaining in uniform.  Has there been a change of heart, now that even the CDS has acknowledged the situation needs to be addressed?

Kidney stones, and wounds acquired on operation are two different things wouldn't you agree?

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Offline 284_226

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #68 on: December 26, 2007, 21:37:29 »
Kidney stones, and wounds acquired on operation are two different things wouldn't you agree?

Are they?  Under existing regs - both conditions, if they prevent deployability, will end a serviceperson's career.

Offline 284_226

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #69 on: December 26, 2007, 21:54:01 »
So re-jig some structures to provide public service employment with portability of benefits.  Ensure a robust transition program is in place.  Provide a clear policy on medical / rehab leave.  Get VAC to provide services starting a month before release to ensure continuity of care (and for every case where they fail, start docking performance pay from everyone in VAC in receipt of it).  But don't tie up Reg F PYs with pers who will be unable to recover sufficiently to meet U of S.

All valid points, save for the last sentence.  It's clear that something is coming that will allow individuals to violate UoS, but still continue to serve.

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #70 on: December 26, 2007, 22:05:27 »
Are they?  Under existing regs - both conditions, if they prevent deployability, will end a serviceperson's career.

One aquired do to service, other due to genetics/lifestyle.....

You tell us....

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Offline ArmyVern

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #71 on: December 26, 2007, 22:12:13 »
I'm "one of those people from the other threads". Still am.

No change of heart here, there are ways to look after these people without putting our deployability at risk and reducing the number of fit UoS deployable personnel who will, of course, ultimately be the ones who end up doing the gritty overseas work and deployments. Without an increased Reg F PY capability of posn numbers to match those unfit UoS being resigned -- eventually the CF will see those who are fit and deployable on sick leave and stress leave themselves. And, I think that dapaterson has expressed my thoughts exactly.

Accomodation is one thing -- but build in extra posns for those we accomodate or transfer them to civ service with retention of benefits.

Otherwise, we really are reducing our fit manning levels, but still expecting those reduced numbers of fit pers to accomplish the lions share and burden of deployed ops. Their families, I'm sure, will love that given that they already require 12 months of workups away from home to deploy for 6 months. I see rising divorce rates and increased released rates amongst the fit UoS pers if this comes to pass wihout a necessary increase in funded RegF PY to match those being retained who are unfit.

My prediction? It'll all look good for 5 years ... til the fit people doing all the deployments and field work back in Canada say "enough already ..." and get the hell out. Cripes, there's enough of them doing so now without this further decrease in deployable personnel; because, that's exactly what it is -- a decrease in the number of deployable personnel we have. Each of those positions filled by unfit UoS personnel ... mean one less position that we can recruit a fit for deployment or field person into.

Kind of how FRP looked good ... until the CF figured out just how badly that came back to bite them in the *** when all most of their Cpls were 40 years old and everyone above the rank of Sgt was eligible for retirement within 5 years of each other.  ::)
« Last Edit: December 26, 2007, 22:25:37 by ArmyVern »
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Offline 284_226

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #72 on: December 26, 2007, 22:16:02 »
One aquired do to service, other due to genetics/lifestyle.....

You tell us....

It's never as clear cut as one might think at first glance.  If it were, the US Army wouldn't be operating lithotripters in Iraq.

You can substitute any malady - was there a contributing factor related to military service?

Offline the 48th regulator

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #73 on: December 26, 2007, 22:34:22 »
It's never as clear cut as one might think at first glance.  If it were, the US Army wouldn't be operating lithotripters in Iraq.

You can substitute any malady - was there a contributing factor related to military service?


hehehe,

Can I punch your ticket for your ride on our coat tails?

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Re: Keeping wounded in CF - merged super-thread
« Reply #74 on: December 26, 2007, 22:58:20 »
I'm "one of those people from the other threads". Still am.

No change of heart here, there are ways to look after these people without putting our deployability at risk and reducing the number of fit UoS deployable personnel who will, of course, ultimately be the ones who end up doing the gritty overseas work and deployments. Without an increased Reg F PY capability of posn numbers to match those unfit UoS being resigned -- eventually the CF will see those who are fit and deployable on sick leave and stress leave themselves. And, I think that dapaterson has expressed my thoughts exactly.

Again, valid points.

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Accomodation is one thing -- but build in extra posns for those we accomodate or transfer them to civ service with retention of benefits.

Agreed.  I'd prefer the former, but the latter would work if the legislation has teeth.

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Otherwise, we really are reducing our fit manning levels, but still expecting those reduced numbers of fit pers to accomplish the lions share and burden of deployed ops. Their families, I'm sure, will love that given that they already require 12 months of workups away from home to deploy for 6 months. I see rising divorce rates and increased released rates amongst the fit UoS pers if this comes to pass wihout a necessary increase in funded RegF PY to match those being retained who are unfit.

Agreed.  All things remaining equal, the ones who are deployable would be forced to deploy more.  It's simple math.

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My prediction? It'll all look good for 5 years ... til the fit people doing all the deployments and field work back in Canada say "enough already ..." and get the hell out. Cripes, there's enough of them doing so now without this further decrease in deployable personnel; because, that's exactly what it is -- a decrease in the number of deployable personnel we have. Each of those positions filled by unfit UoS personnel ... mean one less position that we can recruit a fit for deployment or field person into.

There's two schools of thought on that.  What about the number of people who are choosing not to enroll or not to re-engage because they realize "Hey, we're being shot at now - I'd like to make sure my future is secure if one of those bullets ends up in my body"?  You have to admit - the press has a field day with stories of those who return from overseas with debilitating injuries.  That has to play a factor in how we're viewed strictly as an employer, and how we treat our injured personnel.

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Kind of how FRP looked good ... until the CF figured out just how badly that came back to bite them in the *** when all most of their Cpls were 40 years old and everyone above the rank of Sgt was eligible for retirement within 5 years of each other.  ::)

Yup, and we're still feeling the effects of it, even 12 years later.  I know, my ex-wife took FRP back in 1995.

It's clear that a blanket "if you're not deployable, you're not employable" policy won't work.  It's equally clear that retaining every single member who is faced with a breach of UoS is also an impossibility.

Where's the happy medium?

From the looks of things, now is the time to start talking about it - whether you're a deployable member, or you're an injured member - because both are going to be equally affected by any upcoming change in policy.