Author Topic: Migration  (Read 2086 times)

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Offline E.R. Campbell

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Migration
« on: November 19, 2015, 12:38:47 »
There has been several "great migrations" in history: 1,500ish years ago Europe was totally transformed as tribes like the Goths, Vandals, Angles, Saxons, Lombards, Suebi, Frisii, Jutes and Franks were pushed westwards by e.g. the Huns, Avars, Slavs, Bulgars and Alans. In all a very few million people were involved but they changed the world. In the 19th century (from say 1815 to 1865) Canada experienced its own "great migration" as over 750,000 Europeans came here ~ changing our world. In the 20th century the USA experienced two "great migrations:" in the period from about 1910 to about 1940 over 5 million black Americans migrated from the deep South to the industrial North and then, in the late 20th century and stretching to today, over 10, maybe even 15 million Latin Americans have "migrated," mostly illegally to the USA. Those two migration had and are still having profound effects on the USA.

Now, writing in the Globe and Mail, Jeffrey Simpson posits that we, Canada, must consider how we might respond to another, imminent, "great migration" in this artiucle which is reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions of the Copyright Act from that newspaper:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/globe-politics-insider/jeffrey-simpson-the-refugee-discussion-is-just-beginning/article27325258/
Quote

The refugee discussion is just beginning

SUBSCRIBERS ONLY

Jeffrey Simpson
The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015

The commitment to bring 25,000 Syrian refugees to Canada before Dec. 31, made by the Liberals in the heat of an election campaign, should be seen not as the end but as the beginning of a multiyear commitment to bring tens and tens of thousands more refugees to Canada over many years.

Quite apart from whether the government can meet its artificial and politically driven timetable for the 25,000, the larger question is whether the government and the Canadian people are willing, ready and able to handle much bigger numbers in the years ahead. No one has thought about this, let alone prepared for it. Circumstances, however, will force reflection.

This 25,000 contingent, and the many who will follow if the government sticks to its policies, is not like, say, previous groups of refugees from Vietnam, Uganda or Kosovo. These groups were much smaller in number, displaced by one event at a given place. By contrast, there were three-day periods throughout the summer and fall when more refugees/migrants were landing on the Greek island of Lesbos than Canada proposes to admit in two months.

Today’s refugees/migrants are part of a mass movement of millions of people fleeing military conflict, entrenched poverty and government breakdowns across an arc of states in the Middle East and Africa. Climate change is already widening desertification, which causes people to leave drought in search of food.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that there are now about 60 million refugees around the world, and that number is almost certainly going to rise. Since large countries such as China, Russia and Japan (and many others) either don’t want refugees/migrants, or refugees/migrants don’t wish to go there, the mass movement will head to countries with advanced economies and liberal democratic traditions.

The migration that landed almost a million people in Europe this year did not come from war-torn Syria alone, where an estimated six to eight million people are displaced internally and millions more live in camps in Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan. The migration comes from Iraq, Afghanistan, Eritrea, Libya, Yemen, Egypt, Pakistan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nigeria and other African countries.

There are those who are leaving their native lands and those who wish to join them. A Gallup poll, for example, reported that a quarter of Afghanistan’s population said it wanted to leave, following on the heels of an estimated 100,000 who have left this year.

Another Gallup poll, taken from 2009 to 2011, and reported in The New York Times, said 40 per cent of Nigeria’s residents would leave if they could. That poll was taken before the insurgent/terrorist group Boko Haram began wreaking havoc on villages and cities in the north of Africa’s most populous country.

There are no signs yet of any movement toward peace and stability in countries wracked by insurrections, clan fighting and terrorism. The Taliban remain active in many of Afghanistan’s provinces. Iraq, a thoroughly failed state, cannot oust the Islamic State from its midst. Nor can Syria, which is also divided among a welter of militias and other forces hostile to each other and the government in Damascus.

Fighting roars on in Yemen, with Saudi Arabia now intervening and the United States using drone strikes. Libya, where Western countries including Canada ousted former president/dictator Moammar Gadhafi, has dissolved into warring clans. Egypt is plagued by IS, or groups claiming to be associated with IS, in the Sinai. Civil war rocks Congo.

Palestinians live in the hellhole that is Gaza and watch land they believe to be theirs devoured by Israeli settlements in the West Bank. The incentives for some of them to depart are obvious.

Mass movements debilitate countries that lose people because among them are some of the best-educated and most skilled. They have the money and wherewithal to depart. The countries they leave behind are, therefore, deprived of some of their best and brightest, which in turn makes it harder for these countries to succeed and easier for them to spiral downward.

The government is preoccupied with figuring out how to bring 25,000 to Canada by Dec. 31.

Thereafter, the government and Canadians should decide if they want to bring in perhaps 10 times that number or more in the years ahead – a number that would still be only a drop in the ocean of refugees and migrants.


First, in my opinion: this is not about refugees ~ not only about refugees, anyway.

Even if we could and did solve many of the political problems (tyrants and tin-pot dictators) that create refugees, there would still be probably hundreds of millions of people want to migrate for perfectly good, sound socio-economic reasons. Most of those people are in Africa and the Middle East and South-West Asia so their nearest "safe haven" is Europe.

Europe is already experiencing terrible tensions that threaten to rip apart the fabric of traditional European society. We can see, in America, some of the social and political impacts ~ some bad, some good ~ of millions of migrants from Latin America.

The issues of culture and, especially in Quebec, la laïcité vs reasonable accommodation of religious beliefs, are already under stress in Canada.

I agre with Jeffrey Simpson: "Canadians should decide if they want to bring in perhaps 10 times that number* or more in the years ahead – a number that would still be only a drop in the ocean of refugees and migrants" and we must understand that these "mass movements debilitate countries that lose people because among them are some of the best-educated and most skilled. They have the money and wherewithal to depart. The countries they leave behind are, therefore, deprived of some of their best and brightest, which in turn makes it harder for these countries to succeed and easier for them to spiral downward." Only a handful of countries, most notably China and India have an actual surplus of well educated, sophisticated, entrepreneurial people ~ the sorts of people we want to come to Canada; if we take the "best and brightest" from Africa and the Middle East and West Asia we are just going to make things worse in the countries they are trying to leave behind. If we don't take the "worst" then we are doing the same: exacerbating the problems.

This is a political problem for Canada. It is a political problem for Australia and America, too, and also for Europe and probably even South America.

If Mr Simpson is right, and I fear he is, then we have more, much more than just a smallish (25,000) refugee crisis, we have an enormous migration which will change the whole world.

____
* The 25,000 Syrian refugees we currently plan to accept.
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline mariomike

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Re: Migration
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2015, 13:08:05 »
* The 25,000 Syrian refugees we currently plan to accept.

No comment on the politics, but the number I read was 35,000.

"Canada is to take 35,000 Syrians, including 10,000 the Harper government agreed to accept earlier this year."
http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/refugees-line-up-for-million-dollar-ticket-to-canada-but-the-odds-are-heavily-against-them#ixzz3rxhyOI10
« Last Edit: November 19, 2015, 13:16:34 by mariomike »

Offline George Wallace

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Re: Migration
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2016, 11:04:45 »
Now comes a question:  Opening our doors to large numbers of refugees, not just Syrian, many of them unskilled and then kicking out skilled people who have come here with the intention of becoming Permanent Residents and Canadians, raises a few questions as to what the priorities and agenda is in our Government.  I am wondering where John McCallum is?

Reproduced under the Fair Dealings provisions of the Copyright Act.

Quote
SUFFIELD FAMILY FACING DEPORTATION ARE FIGHTING TO STAY IN CANADA
Leah Murray @CHATTV_LMurray
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2016

A UK family living in Suffield is about to lose everything they’ve worked so hard for.
On November 22nd they will be receiving a deportation notice after their permanent residency application was denied. The family is now fighting to keep the life they’ve built for themselves here in Canada.
“I’ve got nothing, I’ve got no job to go back to. I’ll step off that plane in the UK, am I a refugee in my own country then? Holding my daughter’s hand, where do I go?” Said Mark Lowe
 
After living and working in Canada for over 4 years, that could become a reality for Mark, his wife Michaela and their daughter Isabella.
They’ve been fighting to get permanent residency for the past two years. Their application was denied earlier this year and their appeal was denied last month. Now they face deportation.
“Coming over here was for me to set up a new life for my daughter, setting up a new life for this family. And now to get put in the situation where I’m getting, on the 22nd of November, deported. Was it worth it to even come over here? Start a new life and literally end up in a gutter.” said Michaela.
 
The couple says their application was denied because they can’t provide proper medical information for Michaela’s son who lives with his father in Germany. But, they say the father of the teen has full custody and despite their best efforts he’s been uncooperative in providing the required information about the 16 year old. The Lowes have been trying to get the child waived from the application, but they say despite submitting documentation supporting the fact they do not have custody of the child, they have not been allowed to waive him.
“He’s in Germany with his father, he didn’t want to come here, we’re not trying to get him here.” said Mark.
 
Mark is a skilled worker and former British Soldier who had been working as a millwright at a company in Redcliff, his wife had a job in retail, and their daughter was going to school in Redcliff. Despite both having jobs, the Lowe’s work visa extension was also denied. They’ve been unable to work since August 22nd and are now having to sell their home.
“Without jobs like everybody else out there, you can’t pay your bills, you can’t pay your mortgage, your car insurance, gas electric all those sorts of things, put food on the table for your family.” said Mark.
CHAT TV News reached out Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada to talk about the decision to deny the family permanent residency, but they were unable to provide a comment on the case at this time, despite repeated requests.
 
Now, the family has less than three months to try and restore their status, or be deported. Having no income they can’t afford to hire an immigration lawyer and instead are relying on Members of Parliament and their staff to fight for them.
“The MP’s that are working on our behalf, that’s literally our lifeline at the moment to try and get this resolved.” said Mark.
 
There is a glimmer of hope for the family. With the help of the local MP’s office, their daughter was allowed to return to school on September 8th.
 
Although they feel it may be a losing battle, the family says they will keep fighting to stay in Canada as long as they can.
“I’m not asking for the world, I’m asking that I get my permanent residency, and I can stay here and work and my daughter can go to school and we can get on with our lives, the same as everybody else. That’s basically it in a nutshell.”
 
The Lowe family also has a go-fund-me page set up, they are hoping to rely on the kindness of strangers to help them cover their expenses while they fight to stay in Canada.


More on LINK.

Now this is not the first time I have heard of families who have settled down and run successful business, or held jobs, but who were not refugees, but at one time Permanent Residents who had then been deported due to bureaucratic bumbling or incompetence.   In many cases, they have been people from Commonwealth nations.  One case, I remember being prominent in the news, was a Pizza chain owner in Halifax, from Lebanon, well established in Canada for a couple decades.

So?  Where is the  Minister of Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship?
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Offline George Wallace

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Re: Migration
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2016, 12:58:59 »
Interviews with Mark Lowe in Aug 2016:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCEWXYTs-J4
DISCLAIMER: The opinions and arguments of George Wallace posted on this Site are solely those of George Wallace and not the opinion of Army.ca and are posted for information purposes only.

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Offline Brad Sallows

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Re: Migration
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2016, 23:03:58 »
It usually works out one of two ways.  Either the host population assimilates the immigrants, or the immigrants change the host culture.  There is no law of nature which requires the change to be net positive.

We need to stop running away from every potentially awkward discussion about what is or is not acceptable while bleating platitudes about diversity and commitment to openness.  We need to be hard-nosed about commitment to (individual) liberty and unapologetically intolerant toward potentially oppressive practices.
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