Author Topic: The Really Big One  (Read 12554 times)

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Offline mariomike

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B.C. Earthquake Immediate Response Plan
http://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/public-safety-and-emergency-services/emergency-preparedness-response-recovery/provincial-emergency-planning/irp.pdf

The Government Operations Centre, upon notification of a catastrophic earthquake affecting Greater Vancouver or Greater Victoria, will immediately coordinate the request and movement of HUSAR teams, both domestic and international, for deployment to B.C. The Province will also employ mutual aid agreements, such as the Pacific Northwest Emergency Management Arrangement (PNEMA), with neighbouring states for HUSAR support. The Province will control, coordinate and prioritize the deployment of all civilian HUSAR assets within B.C. based on local authority and First Nations needs assessment.

Contingency Plan PANORAMA: Canadian Armed Forces Joint Task force Pacific’s response plan for a catastrophic earthquake in Southwest British Columbia or Southern Vancouver Island area.

Department of National Defence – Contingency Plan PANORAMA
Following a catastrophic earthquake event affecting southern Vancouver Island and/or the Greater Vancouver area, Joint Task Force Pacific (JTFP) will assess the situation and, if required, activate the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) regional Contingency Plan (CONPLAN) PANORAMA – which is the CAF regional response to a catastrophic earthquake effecting B.C. Engagement with civil authorities will occur early and at multiple levels to determine how and where military forces will be best engaged in immediate response activities in support of the Province.
CONPLAN PANORAMA is linked to and integrated with other CAF regional and higher level plans. Combined, these plans detail actions of the CAF units, bases and formations in B.C., and the reinforcement of JTFP with other high readiness CAF elements throughout Canada. Reinforcement will occur through a combination of pre-planned deployments and through the Request for Assistance (RFA) process.

Canadian Armed Forces JOINT TASK FORCE PACIFIC (JTFP)
• Establish contact and liaison with the PECC/PERRC
• Establish contact and liaison with all PREOCs
• Local units/bases/formations to establish contact and liaison with local authority EOCs
• Report status of Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) in B.C. and response actions
• Within capability, reinforce first responders to provide initial actions to save lives
• Conduct reconnaissance and contribute to JOA situational assessment
• Provide personnel and equipment to augment provincial response
• Provide personnel to augment the PECC/PERRC operations on request
• Commence preparations for receiving CAF reinforcements from outside the JOA
• Commence preparations for receiving US Military reinforcements under the Civil Assistance Plan (CAP)



« Last Edit: February 17, 2017, 12:30:07 by mariomike »
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Offline Colin P

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Re: The Really Big One
« Reply #51 on: February 17, 2017, 13:03:26 »
I would mobilize all the tugs and barges that survived to be the transportation network across the inlets and rivers until the remaining bridges are certified safe to use. Transport Canada will need to suspend certain requirements to make that work, in fact having someone who can tell regulating busybodies to piss off and others to get off their *** will be a key component in resolving any such crisis.

I would also make it a requirement for a city permit for food trucks and carts for them to report as soon as possible after a major disaster to a primary or secondary location to help feed survivors. That location to be posted on the truck/cart so they know where to go.

Online Remius

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Re: The Really Big One
« Reply #52 on: February 17, 2017, 13:20:55 »
I would also make it a requirement for a city permit for food trucks and carts for them to report as soon as possible after a major disaster to a primary or secondary location to help feed survivors. That location to be posted on the truck/cart so they know where to go.

I'm pretty sure that food carts and trucks don't carry a lot of inventory on hand beyond a day or two.  Plus I suspect they'll be busy looking after themselves. 
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Offline mariomike

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Re: The Really Big One
« Reply #53 on: February 17, 2017, 13:48:26 »
Hopefully, federal funding of Vancouver HUSAR CAN-TF1 will continue.

From 2012,

Feds cut funds to Vancouver urban search and rescue team
http://bc.ctvnews.ca/feds-cut-funds-to-vancouver-urban-search-and-rescue-team-1.799127
Vancouver's fire chief was caught off guard this week when he learned that the federal government had cut funding to the city's urban search and rescue team, a crucial resource in case "the big one" hits.
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Offline Colin P

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Re: The Really Big One
« Reply #54 on: February 17, 2017, 13:52:14 »
It's more the cooking facility, basically the bigger trucks are flying kitchens. Many won't make it, but the city already has emergency hubs set up, having them setup there and cook food as provided for the survivors will ease the burden on the civil authorities and get clean safe food into people. The problem with people in the West is that if you gave them cooking oil, baking powder, sugar and flour, the vast majority would not know what to do with it. Most 3rd world types would actually do better in the initial stages of a disaster, than first world types in my opinion. 

Online Remius

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Re: The Really Big One
« Reply #55 on: February 17, 2017, 14:12:57 »
It's more the cooking facility, basically the bigger trucks are flying kitchens. Many won't make it, but the city already has emergency hubs set up, having them setup there and cook food as provided for the survivors will ease the burden on the civil authorities and get clean safe food into people. The problem with people in the West is that if you gave them cooking oil, baking powder, sugar and flour, the vast majority would not know what to do with it. Most 3rd world types would actually do better in the initial stages of a disaster, than first world types in my opinion.

Of course.  Most of those places are self sufficient in that sense.  You live in a shyte hole before it's just a bigger shyte hole than before.

Our creature comforts make us less self sufficient.  The ice storm showed us that here.  People burning their houses down or poisoning themselves with fumes as they barbecued in their kitchens. if the effect on the city had been longer and worse I shudder to think what would have happened.  The rural areas at least had some people fending for themselves having generators, pumps, tools and the know how to keep themselves going (for a few weeks in some cases).

I think though what we do have over those 3rd world locales is the ability to get things running again, more efficiently and quicker.     
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Offline Colin P

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Re: The Really Big One
« Reply #56 on: February 17, 2017, 15:42:22 »
True the initial bit will be harder, but things will sort themselves out sooner and attention to important details like Public health and Hygienic will be there preventing a lot of disease related issues.